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Full text of "Western Graphic (Jan.-June 1899)"

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CALM ORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/westgraph06unse 




THE vision of .ioan of ai<c 



2 




GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

ben. c. truman :-: :-: :-: editor 




HENRY T. GAGE was inaugurated 
Wednesday Governor of California and 
entered upon his duties of the four years to 
follow — and that he will he a functionary 
that cannot be bulldozed, purchased or ca- 
joled goes without saying among all those 
who have known him intimately for twenty 
odd years. In reflecting on the great triumph 
of the new Governor, his sublime courage as 
well as his engaging personality must never 
be lost sight of. "I had never seriously con- 
sidered this random talk about my candidacy," 
he said to the writer one day last May, " but 
since there are numbers of newspapers around 
my own home here that are determined I shall 
not become a candidate— that declare that I 
have no right to become a candidate — I be- 
lieve that I will just go out quietly and an- 
nounce my candicacy this afternoon. Yes, I 
will make a public announcement today, then 
I will set about at once to secure the nomina- 
tion and then I will pitch in and win." And 
that is the way Gage commenced his cam- 
paign. Quite a number of the leading papers 
of Los Angele* county declared that his action 
was both impudent and impotent, and that 
he not only had no right to aspire to such at- 
tainment, and that even if he rallied a few 
supporters in this section they would appear 
as ridiculous as Falstaff's so'diers, but that he 
would secure no other delegates as " no one 
above had ever heard of any such person." 
Some of these papers threw cold-storage chills 
all along his way, even up to his departure 
for the nominating convention, while others 
quietly hedged when they perceived his whirl- 
wind methods of accumulating adherents. He 
made the canvas of the State along the same 
lines that he pursued in Southern California, 
making no promises, offering no inducements, 
participating in no conditions, and abusing 
no man or thing and abstaining from denials 
of all kinds. The result is better known — he 
went to Sacramento and was nominated by 
acclamation; the only event of the kind on 
record in our country, where a young man 
who had never held a legislative or other 
office, starts out with a grip to see the people 
of his state, multitudes of whom had never 
heard of him, and tells them he wants to be 
their Governor, and then goes to the State 
Capital and gets the nomination presented 
him on a silver platter. It was wonderful, 
magnificent, sublime! It was, in another way, 
but, of course, not so universal in character or 
scope, not unlike the sailing of the Oregon, which 
was taking place at about the same time, and 
which will go down to history as the sublim- 
est episode of modern times. 

Then came the fiercer struggle, and the 
more difficult one. And here was shown the 
nobility of character, the irreproachable man- 
hood, the indomitable nerve, the bonhommie, 
and the thoroughly good American stuff of 
Henry T. Gage. He spurned all compacts 
and all conditions and made no promises to a 



Western Graphic 

human being. He pursued somewhat about 
his own course, but was never unmindful of 
the aggregated wisdom and superior tact of 
his splendid State Committee, which, by the 
way, never made even an infinitesimal mis- 
take during the campaign. There were unex- 
pected occurances during the campaign but 
the main figure preserved his equanimity and 
equipoise at all times and upon all occasions 
from start to finish. The secrets of his com- 
mittee's work showed one trivial misappre- 
hension, but no friction. Maguire opened up 
ferociously on the Republican candidate and 
said a number of mean, untruthful things, and, 
of course, trotted out the old cadaverous 
" bogie man" the Southern Pacific Railroad — 
which, while taking no particular side up to 
that time, being a tax payer is presumed to 
have have had some preference — and Gage 
struck back. At this committee meeting, 
after some desultory chat, our Henry was 
asked for his opinion and he said: " I should 
have preferred to have gone through this cam- 
paign without indulging in even pleasantries. 
I would never have called the attention of the 
poor democratic readers of the Examiner 
and the farmers generally to the fact that 
that paper invariably represents Maguire 
as a dude in a Prince Albert coat and 
silk or derby hat, and me as a jay in ill-fit- 
ting clothes and a mattress full of uncombed 
hair. Now I stood Maguire's underhanded 
ways quite a while. But I am perfectly will- 
ing to abide by your counsel. Permit me, how- 
ever, to call your attention to the case of Mr. 
Estee: twice he was the Republican candidate 
for Governor. Of course he was bitterly as- 
sailed by the other side. Now, what were his 
tactics ? Did he fight back ? O, no. He 
merely referred to the assaults and then 
laughingly said that they who made them 
were gentlemen Was Estee elected ? " That 
settled it, and th ; committee permitted its 
charge to get in at Maguire's political solar 
plexus just as often and as ferociously as he 
pleased. 

To be sure there were those who had lis- 
tened to the sophistry, the sophomoric rhet- 
oric and the parading before-the-looking glass 
delivery of the slick looking tailor-made can- 
didate of the party of the poor and distressed 
and who thought that Gage was not polished 
enough in his manner of speech; and some of 
of these had recommendations to make, but 
which were unheeded. And there were some 
who took our candidate to task because he 
praised the Republican party. "My God!" 
exclaimed Gage to one of these sensitive per- 
sons, " What is there that we can Fay better 
things of ?" 

And so he went on day by day and night 
after night reaching for Maguire's solar 
plexus through the single-tax, sand lot, anti 
sand lot, Buckley, anti-Buckley, Democrat, 
independent Democrat, anti-Hawaii, anti-pro- 
tection to California fruits and wool and wines 
and other Maguire isms, perfectly indifferent 
regarding either what George Crocker or Father 
York said or did, disdaining to be scared by 
any old bogie cadaver and declining to be 
made a cat's paw by anti-railroad howlers or 
other professional political dead beats and 
mercenary bummers. On he went, dividing 
his time in praises of the grand old party he 
had grown up with and loved so well, in ever- 
lastingly reaching for that political solar plex- 
us and in modestly promising what he would 
do after being elected. 

There has been no other j ust such a triumph 



from start to finish in the history of American 
politics. There has never been another trip 
from shore to shore like that of the Oregon. It 
stands alone in the annals of the navy. Cap- 
tain Clark, the magician of the sea! Henry 
T. Gage, the magician of the Republican par- 
ty in California ! 

The tragedy that took place at the City 
Hall early in the week was a sad affair in 
every way, and may have a tendency to some- 
what check for the time being the moral de- 
linquency that seems to prevail with no one 
to say it nay. There has always been profli- 
gacy and intemperance in the world since the 
creation, but never so much among young 
men as at present, and especially in Los 
Angeles, where laws are lax, custodians of 
morals indifferent and incapable, temptation 
of drink and licentiousness on every street, 
and at nearly every corner, and an unwilling- 
ness of parents to see that their sons do not 
too early get on the dangerous side of life. 
These are days when the boys need a more 
careful looking after than in the better ordered 
cities a quarter of a century ago. The home- 
side curfew should lull to sleep every boy 
under sixteen years of age, or boys of that age 
and under should not be allowed to run in the 
streets after dark at least. Some such restraint 
is to boys the best foundation of that chival- 
rous and devoted attitude toward women 
which is due to the mothers of our race, who 
imperil their own lives that others may live, 
and which is one of the best ways of insuring 
honorable relations with the other sex. The 
cold-blooded murder of Geo. B. King is the 
first of the kind in this city, and the aban- 
doned creature who committed the act should 
be reasonably punished for her crime. King 
had been guilty of no act such as killing is 
the proper punishment for. He had unfortu- 
nately been too good and too lenient to a 
wanton, from whom it was difficult to tear 
himself permanently away; he felt that it was 
more and more disgraceful to further pursue a 
domestic career so detrimental to himself and 
tho?e he loved more honorably and who loved 
him more truly in return, and so he resolved 
to live a dual life no longer and to "shake" 
the scarlet devil. And then the scarlet devil 
coolly shot the poor fellow down like a rat in 
his own hole, as it would appear. 

Some of our best boys may occasionally 
go astray when we least think them capable 
of such a thing, and get lost in the mirage of 
illicit bewitchment just as did George B. King, 
but the public characters that entice them 
must be made to understand that they cannot 
murder them in cold blood in the event of 
their determination to emancipate themselves 
from their dangerous entanglements. 



The attention of all readers is called to 
our Manila letters, generally, and especially 
to the one presented this week, which is full 
of gossip and instruction. The Western 
Graphic is the only journal on the coast out- 
side of San Francisco that has a regular cor- 
respondent in that far away land, and with 
the exception of those exceedingly well writ- 
ten letters of General Otis, in his own paper, 
the Times, ours are the best published by any 
California newspaper. 

The picture on our front page this week is 
a reproduction of a celebrated French master- 
piece, and represents Joan of Arc, the French 
heroine that drove the English from Orleans 
(1429), hearing the celestial voices that bade 



Western Graphic 



3 



her leave her home and undertake her patri- 
otic mission. The Western Graphic repro- 
duces it from the calendar of the French paper 
Le Francais, published in this city by Prof. 
Jean Trebaol. 



The death of Dion Romandy, a child of 
genius and the possessor of great musical 
ability and versatility, and for a long time 
the accomplished leader of the Orpheum or- 
chestra, then the best in the State, created a 
pang of sorrow from all who knew him, per- 
sonally and professionally. He was fast be- 
coming a leading composer, his "Old Glory" 
being the best of its kind for years. His 
funeral took place on Thursday and was the 
most impressive but that of General Rosecrans 
ever seen here. 



The press hereabouts praise Governor 
Gage's inaugural, and so far as we can dis- 
cover gives satisfaction to everyone. What he 
had to say regarding the cost of state govern- 
ment, payment of appropriations, the State 
Printing Office, cost of public buildings, State 
claims, irrigation, war claims, coyote scalps, 
cost of election and newspaper advertising, 



intermediate appellate courts, controller's war- 
rants, county claims against the state for com- 
missions for collecting taxes and the Paris 
Exposition was said well and honestly, and 
affords small chance for political opponents to 
cavil at. He placed himself squarely with 
the majority of his countrymen on the ques- 
tion of expansion, and approvingly by the 
people of Southern California on the San 
Pedro harbor activities, as follows: 

The completion of the work already begun 
upon the San Pedro harbor is of great impor- 
tance to the State and should receive the 
fullest support from our Senators and Repre- 
sentatives in Congress, who should be requested 
to use all lawful efforts for the passage of a 
measure favoring its consideration as well as 
to give their fullest support to all measures 
designed to improve our rivers and harbors. 

The January number of the Ebell, edited 
by Grace Atherton Dennen, is a real cornu- 
copia of instructive literary viands and re- 
flects much credit on its editor and other de- 
lightful contributors. The printing and bind- 
ing is executed in that acceptable way for 
which the firm of Rice & Sons has made itself 
so popular and would do honor to the Christ- 



mas efforts of the best printing houses in Chi- 
cago and New York. 



It is Mayor Eaton now, and his hosts of 
friends believe he will make as good a chief 
magistrate of Los Angeles as has ever been 
seated in a mayor's chair. The Western 
Graphic feels a good deal of pride in the fact 
that it had the presumption to name Fred 
Eaton as our next mayor more than a year 
ago, and that it supported him vigorously 
and in other ways helped to elect him. 



That was a nice New Year's present we 
had in the way of a precipitation, although it 
was somewhat slighter than was promised by 
the affable clerk of the weather. It was quite 
enough to start the grass and barley, it fresh- 
ened up the leaves of the trees and imparted 
a cleaner look to bush and brick and rustic 
and shingle, wiped out the dust of many 
months from the streets and roads and made 
many a merchant and farmer feel moderately 
radiant and happy. But we want some more. 

A number of new features will be pre- 
sented next week. 




SIMON MAIER'S MARKET IN HOLIDAY ATTIRK 



id many of them were exceedingly fetching and beautiful — none came anywhere near up to that 
1 reality as photographic portraiture will permit. It was probably the finest exhibit of meats and 



of Simon 
lard ever 



Among all the Holiday attractions in Los Angeles — an 

Maier's, which is reproduced above and given as much reality as photographic portraiture will permit- 
attempted by any butcher or packer, and drew thousands of beholders daily for more than a week. Hundreds of quarters and halves of fattened young cattle, 
and wholes of veal, venison, lamb, mutton and pork, all arranged artistically and esthetically decorated in ribbon, flower and medal, and good imitation faces in 
lard of Lincoln, Grant, Dewey, Hobson, Miles, Wheeler and others, and the Olympia in great shape, as will be seen by the engraving, made an ensemble that 
betrayed artists in more ways than one in Mr. Maier's emplcy. 



i 



Western Graphic 



Hn 6pisode of Sbilob 

BY BEN C. TRUMAN 

ONE afternoon during the latter part of 
April, 1 862, I said to General Grant 
that I thought I would go down the river and 
visit the Cherrys at Savannah, and he replied: 
"I will give you a few lines of introduction 
to Mrs. Cherry; you will find her a most de- 
lightful woman, and you may tell her that I 
am coming soon to see her." 




HOTEIj green annex. 
The word 'annex" does not convey the proper idea in con- 
nection with this magnificent addition to superb Hotel Green, for 
the annex ie as large and even more palatial than the main building. 
A strong point for the new structure is in its being absolutely fire 
proof, and the appointments are as perfect as the wide experience of 
Manager Holmes could suggest and unlimited money could provide. 

In an hour afterwards I left Pittsburg 
Landing with a little note of introduction to 
Mrs. W. H. Cherry, at whose house General 
Grant made his headquarters, along with a 
number of his staff and orderlies, a week or 
two prior to Shiloh. I spent the rest of the 
day there, took supper, staid all night, and 
part of the next day. I shall never forget 
that supper, the main portion of which was 
turkey hash, a dish I had not only never par- 
taken of before, but of which I had never 
heard; and there were tea biscuits, that act- 
ually knocked any my mother had ever 
made, and coffee with cream so thick that it 
came out of the pitcher in gurgling, golden 
chunks. It was a humid evening, and a lit- 
tle darkey stood back of me and waved a pea- 
cock feather fan over my head I was sent to 
bed behind a big darkey carrying upon a tray 
all the ingredients for many a mint julep, 
and was given the room occupied by the Gen- 
eral for the last time on the night of the fifth. 
The bed was of feathers and looked two feet 
thick. There was no latch on the door, the 
plastering had fallen in a number of places, 
there were draperies of cobwebs and an old 
straw hat in the broken window. But there 
was warmth and hospitality all round, and 
that tray containing loaf sugar, a lemon, some 
sprigs of mint, a bottle of Robertson county 
whisky, and a modicum of water. I made 
myself one ambrosial nightcap just before 
retiring, and then got lost in the billowy 
feather bed until along in the night, when 
the mingled sounds from the owl, the dove, 
the nightingale and themockingbirdawiikened 
me and went floating off mellifluously across 
the murmuring river. I ventured one pro- 
digious concoction as a matutinal, and then 



awaited the summons to breakfast. That 
morning we had bacon, roast potatoes, corn 
bread, scrambled eggs, cress and coffee, and 
I was seated immediately at Mrs. Cherry's 
right, with the aforesaid little darkey with 
the peacock feather fan behind me. 

Mrs. Cherry was a superior woman and 
possessed those charms of refined manner 
and graciousness of presence that denote 
unmistakably the high bred lady; and she 
extended the courtesies of her cultivated home 
so delightfully as to make an impression upon 
all who came in contact with her. After a few 
moments of desultory 
conversation she said: 

" The General sat 
right where you are 
sitting when the boom 
of the first cannon came 
down the river. Al- 
though he had retired 
earlier than usual that 
Saturday night, com- 
plaining of a headache, 
he had presented his 
pologies for being a trifle 
late at breakfast, and 
was just placing his cup 
of coffee to his lips when 
a sound as of thunder 
in the distance came in 
at our windows. In an 
in stant he exclaimed: 
'What's that?' and then 
listened, with the cup of 
coffee held inthe same 
position. In less than 
half a minute the sound 
came again, seemingly 
closer and louder. The General then sprang to 
his feet, as did all his staff, drank a swallow or 
two of his coffee hastily, and then said to me: 
'Madam! The ball has opened ! Goodbye!' 
And in five minutes he and his staff and 
orderlies were aboard their little steamer at 
the foot of the hill. The cannonading never 



an occasional sound of cannon all Sunday 
night, and on Monday morning the ominous 
thunders broke out anew, but they became 
more distant and irregular during the after- 
noon, and the philosophers of the levee shook 
their heads forlornly and stroked their beards 
excitedly and said despairingly: 1 We are 
being beaten — we are being beaten — we are 
being beaten!' And, do you know? — I never 
cleared that table until Tuesday, and then I 
prepared dinner for the General and his staff 
for that evening, but they never came, and I 
am afraid I shall never see them again." 
And then tears came into this Southern 
woman's womanly eyes. 



HOTEL VAN NUYS 



EXCEPT that it is somewhat surpassed 
in architectural grandeur and magnifi- 
cence, the people of Los Angeles may felici- 
tate themselves upon the fact that the Van 
Nuys is one of the handsomest and best kept 
hotels in the United States, and that it, is as 
artistic an ornament as. many of the more 
palatial ones in New York and elsewhere in 
eastern metropoli. Owing to its admirable 
appointments and the extremely high grade of 
its service and satisfactory repleteness of its 
many up to date accessories and appliances, 
the Van Nuys, although it has only been 
opened to the traveling public for two years, 
is now as well known throughout the United 
States as the old Astor of New York or the 
Tremont of Boston. Situated in the heart of 
the city, and either upon or near all the street 
railways, makes it a desirable place for its 
patrons, whether of the tourist or commercial 
class. It is as near fire proof as a structure 
can be made, even the all steel and stone and 
tile edifices being no sure thing against the 
element, as has been seen in late fires in 
eastern cities. It is heated throughout by 
the latest and safest and most healihful pro- 
cesses, and its lighting the same. Its cuisine, 
either a la carte or table d'hoie, is as good as 
any in the world, it being Mr. Potter's special 
purpose to make his fare unexcelled. About 
the house, which is usually crowded, are to be 
seen those who enjoy good living and who 
know where to obtain it at proper rates, and 
there is an air of congeniality that betrays 
that effervescing good cheer that comes from 





HOTEL VAN NUYS 



ceased until after nightfall, but I kept the 
coffee on the stove for several hours and had 
a nice supper ready in the evening. All Sa- 
vanna was at the levee for the most of the 
day and along into the night when the rain 
drove most of the people home. There was 



elegant treatment all round by host and 
assistants all. The day has pass<d when Los 
Angeles was shy on hotel excellences. The 
Van Nuys stands as a monument to builder 
and keeper. It is a jewel of its kind whose 
brilliancy illuminates the catalogue of the 
noted caravansaries of the world. 



Western Graphic 



I. W. LORD, PREMIER BARBECUE ORATOR OF 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

THE publishers had some time ago deter- 
min ed to present a photo-engraving of 
I. W. Lord, an ideal child of the West, the 
premier barbecue orator of Southern Cali 
fornia, and a Mark Tapley whose most frown- 
ing clouds have possessed the proverbial silver 
linings, and they therefore 
sent to Mr. Lord f<~>r some^ 
notes from which to con- 
coct a sketch that should 
do the poet laureate of 
Iamosa proud, and here is 
what they received, which 
is too good to tamper with. 
It will be seen that they 
effervesce with the true I. 
W. Lord flavor. We also 
present a little effusion from 
the same gentleman, which 
is not without its lesson, 
albeit it teems with exqui- 
site satire: 

HIS NOTES BY HIMSELF. 

Born in Chicago in 1836. 
Nothing of interest till 
seventeenth year. Hired 
out then with seven other 
boys to drive 316 head of 
loose cattle from eastern 
Illinois to Sacramento. 
Walked all the way. Six 
months and two days made 
the trip. Cattle stampeded 
through attack by Indians 
twice — five head killed but 
boys unhurt. Reached Sac- 
ramento in September, 1854. 
Washed dishes for board in 
big hotel for seven weeks, 
sixteen hours a day, then 
promoted to first cook at 
$75 a month. Ague drove 
me to mountains — mining 
did not pay — had few tools and no grub. 
Walked to Stockton on a half meal a day — 
hired out as an expert vaquero to drive cattle 
from Kern river to Sacramento — made several 
trips with some thirty other professional 
drivers. Desired to return to Illinois and 
show mother how big I had grown, and not 
having money sufficient to make a steamer 
trip hought a second-hand broncho and one 
abandoned mule, and the three of us started 
for the Missouri river. Left Sacramento June 
6, '56; arrived in St. Joe October 8; rode into 
Chicago on said broncbo November 4 and 
headed the celebrated " Fremont parade " of 
30,000 people and carried a special silk ban- 
ner inscribed, " Fremont, free soil, free labor, 
free press, free speech and the woolley horse 
of Kansas." By the way it is a histo- 
rical fact that I was the first man (or 
boy) to cross the great American plains 
alone. Studied medicine, practiced two 
years — mostly practice; didn't wish to kill 
anybody, so kept books for a year for Field, 
Leiter & Co. Had a louder call from Jim Hill of 
the Great Northern; was his cashier for six 
years. Camedirect toCalifornia in March, 1872 ; 
to recover lost health. Brought a little money 
and a barrel of confidence. Used the latter 
and thought I was rich when I started Lords- 
burg and built an eighty thousand dollar 
hotel. "Would that mine enemy" would 
start a town and build a hotel — worse than 
nuggets. Never been able to help humanity 
much, substantially, but if I have only 



amused a few good souls, even at my own 
expense and sacrifice of dignity, I am happy — 
many of you know the rest, and if you tell 
the others I don't care. Of course my well 
known modesty keeps me from putting in the 
good things, except that my paternal ances- 
tor, Thomas Lord, came from England to 
Massachusetts in 1632; his grandson married 




MR. i. w. LORD 

Mary Lee, whose brother was the progenitor 
of Fitzhugh Lee. My father's mother was a 
lineal descendant of George Drake, a first 
cousin of Sir Francis, the dear old pirate, who 
settled in Sag Harbor, Long Island, in 1632. 
On my mother's side my great grandmother's 
mother's brother was grandfather of Henry 
Ward Beecher. Of course I do not pretend to 
claim to possess any of their characteristics, 
but it takes the place of wealth to know it. 

HOW NOT TO GET OLD 

I was lately requested by some person 
bold, to furnish my secret, "How not to get 
old; " here it is, you can have it for what it is 
worth, if I lower the price you may want the 
whole earth; stay up late of nights, thor- 
oughly fill up your skin with doctored cham- 
paign and medical gin; let boiled lobster 
salad try to fill up the chinks, between above- 
mentioned delectable (?) drinks; when pains 
intervene after such like devotions, send 
straight for old pill-bags, his drugs and 
his lotions; let him pour down his poison, his 
pills, and all that, as you send down a ferret 
when after a rat. Let paper-soled shoes so 
pinch up your toes as to leave little room for 
your gossamer hose, and let corsets of steel be 
drawn round you so tight, that your ribs will 
just squeal and turn in out of sight. Get it 
into your head there's a happier land, the 
Creator has promised for those He's not 
damned; be selfish, look doleful, and thus try 
to win it, then kick like a steer when you find 
you're not in it; praise God to his face, tell 
Him all things are level, but show by your 
works you are in with the devil; mind these 
rules and be sure if you find fault and scold, 
it is dollars to cents you will never get old. 

Iamosa, Cal. I. W. Lord. 



NEARLY AN ELOPEMENT 

AFTER GERTRUDE ATHERTON 

THE young man trembled. 
The woman also trembled and said, 
through her handsome hand-carved teeth: 

" He is my husband only in name. I de- 
spise him — I loathe him. We must get 
away : " 

The young man again trembled, and the 
blue blood in his aristocratic-lined veins got 
on the rampage. To think of it I This 
woman, so fair, so young and so beautiful, and 
so willing to light out. And she was his. She, 
in all the glory of her riant youth, was his I 

It was an alluring vision. Acres, yea, 
quarter-sections of ecstacy spread out before 
him like a town site on the Mojave desert in 
halcyon boom days. In the distance, like a 
phantasmagoria, great sun kissed billows of 
three-ply bliss broke crimsonly-sparkling on 
the shores of elysium. 

His whole system — no, being — was thrilled. 
He felt as though billows of Sunset Club 
bacteria had been dipped in honey and elec- 
tricity and were dancing a hula-hula down 
his attenuated spine. 

A November meteor that had come on 
slow freight flashed across a December sky. 

The woman sprang into her lover's arms. 

She shrieked— O, how that oyster-loving, 
sinful, multum in parvo female bicycle 
cranke?s did shriek: 

" Why do you falter ? " 

" Must I out with the truth ?" 

"Yes, for heaven's sake, let me know the 
worst — the weiner-worst. But you must take 
me away ! " 

" I cannot 1 " he cried, in agonizing ac- 
cents, that started Col. Walter Moore due west 
by north by nor'west, while councilman 
Smith went off on one wheel and his left ear 
in an opposite direction. 

"You cannot?" she exclaimed in tones 
that would have been a pointer to Meg Merriles 
or any other old cat. 

" No ! I cannot 1 I cannot I I " 

" Why ? You villain 1 why ?" 

" Because I havn't got but one car fare." 



A STORY OF THE PACIFIC COAST 

COMMENCING with the issue of Jan- 
uary 14, 1899, the publishers of the 
Western Graphic will begin the first chapter 
of an illustrated serial which shall run 
through twenty or more numbers, written by 
Ben C. Truman, entitled " Divorced on the 
Desert, or the Vicissitudes of a Pioneer's 
Life." The story will be exciting and descrip- 
tive, every character in it will be true and all 
the situations, and all the names but two or 
three, will be true to the letter. A thousand 
extra papers will be printed for sample copies 
and the forms will be kept a few days for 
more if necessary. Advertisers should make 
a note of this as many extra papers will be 
published weekly for the next few months. 
Literary men who have seen Mr. Truman's 
story or who have been made acquainted 
with its salient features unanimously agree 
that it is one of the cleverest that has been 
produced by a California writer and that (he 
descriptions of California scenery are highly 
instructive as well as graphic and entertain- 
ing. The publishers are having a number of 
illustrations made for this fine story. The 
terms for the Western Graphic, as reduct d 
by the publishers a year ago, remain at $2 per 
annum, $1 for six months. 



6 




In the Gay Life 

THE first week of the new year was made 
bright and brilliant and joyful by the 
clubs, one of the most delightful events being 
the reception given on Tuesday by the mem- 
bers of the Friday Morning Club to Miss 
Adelaide Hasse, who is on a visit from New 
York to her parents, Dr. and Mrs. Hasse of the 
Soldiers Home. It was thoroughly jolly and a 
large number of ladies took advantage of the 
occasion to show off pretty gowns, although 
the storm king was all the time skirmishing 
and threatening with dark clouds to make 
some of the dashing colors run. 

The same day Mrs. Freeman R. Cady en- 
tertained the members of the Eschsholtzia 
Chapter, Daughters of the Revolution. There 
was the regular routine of business in the 
early part of the evening, after which the 
hostess read a most interesting paper on Pat- 
rick Henry followed by another by Mrs. Cam- 
eron E. Thorn, and then Miss Eva Mitchell 
gave a recitation in good style. Mrs. Cady 
thereafter served refreshments and subse- 
quently Mrs. Thorn presented Mrs. Henry T. 
Lee, regent, and Mrs. Wesley Clark, vice-re- 
gent, with plaques of Washington, and each 
guest with a box of choice candy. It was one 
of the most enjoyable occasions in the history 
of the Chapter. 

The dancing event of the week was the 
Cotillon Club at Kramer's Hall on Monday 
evening, 1 he conceit of carrying out every- 
thing in Japanese, even to lighting the beauti- 
ful hall by lanterns was pretty and effective 
and reflected much credit on the projectors 
and decorators. Tbe favors were also entirely 
Japanese, and embraced dolls, fans, umbrel- 
las, tops and lanterns, and the grand Japanese 
march was lead by the Misses Thom and Ger- 
trude Mason. The figures were all novel and 
beautifully carried out, and after the Japanese 
figure the lights were turned on at their bright- 
est, and the favors were boxes of candy, 
aigrettes, paper ornaments, gilt butterllies,and 
bric-a-brac. The patronesses were Mmes. M. 
T. Allen, Wesley Clark, J. Murietta, Dan Mc 
Farland, M. J. Smith, C. E. Thom, I. N. Van 
Nuys, and the following were the members 
and guests that participated in the cotillon: 
Misses Gertrude Mason, Jette Thom, Annis 
Van Nuys, Emma Graves, Isabel Godin, Ivy 
Schoder, Gertrude McCrae, Mae McCrae, An- 
nette Gibson, Elsie Gibson, Sabina Burks, 
Mariar Shinn, Ella Clark, Inez Clark, Blanche 
Engstrum, Helen Sanborn, Azubah Higgins, 
Clara Smith, Helen Smith, Nellie Clark, Grace 
Clark, Evelyn Gwynne, Frances Barber, Hel- 
en Donnell, Alice Groff, Henrietta Janss, 
Marie Gordon; Messrs. Fred Engstrum, Ross 
Smith, Ralph Smith, Homer Laughhn Jr., 
Charles Seyler Jr., Homer Gregory, Edwin 
Janss, Charles Ensign, Norwood Howard, Guy 
Lewis, Earl Lewis, Robert Allen,Carroll Allen, 
Volney Howard, Phillip Wilson, Dan Laubers- 
heimer, Robert Rowan, Will Phelps, Gustave 
Anecht, Paul Burks, John McGarry, George 
Keller, Simpson Sinsabaugh, Clay Gooding, 
Philo Lindley, Fred Lambourne, Russell Tay- 
lor, John Murietta. 

The Los Angeles Country Club had made 
extensive arrangements for some magnificent 
golf contests for New Years but the rain came, 
just in time to render the play impossible, 
and this part of the program had to be post- 
poned. But Reynolds had been summoned to 
have a collation at the new Club house, rain 
or shine, and the following named ladies and 
gentlemen participated in the most enjoyable 
part of the program that could not be post- 
poned: Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Sartori, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. C. Carpenter, Mr. and Mrs. John D. 
Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Newell, Mr. 
and Mrs, Frederick T. Griffith, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hugh W. Vail, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Tufts, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. R. Warner, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 



Western Graphic 

D. Silent, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Monroe, 
Mmes. Pierre C. Severance, Henry T. Lee, 
Allen C. Balch, Otheman A. Stevens, W. S. 
Porter, Wm. Bartling of Redondo, Misses 
Marie Lee, Emily Severance, RobertsoD, Nicoll, 
Borden, Robertson, Bates, T. N. Lee of New 
York; Wood of Colorado, and Morris of Re- 
dondo. 

Among the New Years receptions and par- 
ties was that given by the Young Women's 
Christian Association at their pleasant rooms 
on West Second 6treet. The rooms had been 
artistically decorated. There were refresh- 
ments and at times during the evening the 
Association band rendered some very accept- 
able music. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Bell also gave a New 
Years party and there was music and danc- 
ing. Refreshments were served and a gener- 
ally good time was indulged in watching the 
old year out and the new year in. 

The guests of the California Hotel were 
treated to a candy pull in addition to other 
festivities of the opening year. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Foreman gave one 
of their unique receptions and entertainments 
similar to those they have given in former 
years. 

Perhaps the reception and dance given by 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Crosby of Figueroa street 
was the most elegant and pretentious New 
Years event of all. The house had been taste- 
fully enlivened by floral decorations. Punch 
was served throughout the evening and Reyn- 
olds catered. After supper dancing was in- 
dulged in. Those receiving were M^sdames 
Walter Cosby, Ezra T. Stimson, William H. 
Holliday, Charles H, Dick, Willard J. Doran, 
Walter G. Barnwell, H. G. Bundrum, Leren 
I). Sale, Misses Maude Newell, Bird Chanslor, 
Hellen Eaton, Bertha Crouch, Julia Winston, 
Helen Fairchild, Lila Fairchild, Bessie Bon- 
sall, Fannie Layng, Florence Jones, Lillian 
Wellborn, Sara Goodrich, Lou Winder, Irene 
Stephens, Ada Patterson, Edith Kirkpatrick, 
Charlotte Miller, Patti Woodward of Chicago, 
McLead of Louisville, Ivy Schroder, May 
Newton, Mary Pickett of North Hampton, 
Mass., Louise McFarland, Genevieve Smith, 
Elizabeth Shankland and Sada Johnson. 

Mrs. H. H. Goldsmith of South Flower 
street entertained a number of her friends at 
whist on Tuesday in honor of Mrs. Bonner of 
New York and Mrs. Goselenski of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Rev. and Mrs. B. F. Coulter entertained 
the employees of the Coulter Dry Goods 
Store on Wednesday evening at the Coulter 
residence on North Hill Street and a very good 
time was for three or four hours in evidence. 

On Wednesday Mrs. Walter A. Newhall 
entertained a number of ladies at luncheon. 

Miss Helen Eaton received yesterday after- 
noon and was assisted by the Misse3 Maude 
Newell and Birdie Chanslor. 

On Monday evening next the University 
of California Glee Club will be given a danc- 
ing party at Kramer's Hall, the patronesses 
being Mesdames Van Nuys, Thom, W. L. 
Graves, J. Ross Clark. T. S. Carville, and T.B. 
Brown. The dansante will be under the 
direction of a number of society misses, who 
will occupy loges and boxes at the concert 
at the Los Angeles Theatre previous to the 
festivities at Kramer's Hall. 

Society will turn out in good style on Tues- 
day next, that being the date of the next sym- 
phony concert at the Los Angeles Theatre. 

Miss Ella Clark, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Ross Clark, left here on Wednesday after- 
noon for Europe, where she will stay for two 
years. Miss Clark will be accompanitd by 
her father as far as New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roth Hamilton, who are 
now residents of San Francisco, have been 
spending the holidays here with Mrs. Hamli- 
ton's parents. Mr. Hamilton returned to 
San Francisco early during the week, but Mrs. 
Hamilton will remain a week or two longer 
as her father, Mr. J. W. Kempton, is at pres- 
ent seriously indisposed. 

Miss Freda Hellman, who has been visit- 
ing the Isaias Hellmans in San Francisco.will 
return about the middle of the month. 




Tht Crown of the Valley 

Pasadena, January 6th, 1899. 

DEAREST BETTY:— Wasn't it awful ! 
We havn't recovered from our mortifica- 
tion yet. This having a Rose Tournament 
with a mackintosh under your white gown, 
knees wrapped in fur robes and a dripping 
umbrella over your head borders on the lud- 
icrous. 

Will you ever forget those limp ostrich 
plumes and the soaked pampas grass and 
those chiffon parasols ! A bedraggled rooster 
wouldn't have been in it. 

Well, nobody but plucky Pasadenans 
would have tried to run in a summer parade 
between winter showers and it was simply 
heroic. It was a solemn occasion and more 
pathetic than any funeral procession I ever 
saw — drawing tears from the very stones. I 
saw the water oozing out myself. 

I told Jessica it was a judgment on me for 
having boasted that by the sign of always 
fair weather Providence favored the fete but 
Jessica said that was just like the egotism of 
some folks thinking all the elements of nature 
were called into use for their chastening and 
discipline. The rain don't prove any- 
thing anyway, Jessica says, for New Years 
day was fair as usual and if we hadn't 
tempted Providence too long all would have 
been well. Then everybody went to church 
Sunday and got on their knees and prayed for 
rain and now are surprised and sort of mad 
because they got it. That's just like the con- 
sistency of seme Christians, Jessica says. 

Any way it was lovely Tuesday and about 
one hundred of the married ladies of the swag- 
ger set were properly grateful for that on ac- 
count of the swell luncheon given at one 
o'clock that day by Mrs. Hampton L. Storey 
of Altadena in honor of Madame Camilla 
Urso. It really was the largest and most ele- 
gant luncheon ever given in this locality. 

The ball room was lighted artificially and 
the guests received there. Lunch was served 
at small tables in the library, drawing room 
and dining room, and every apartment was 
exquisitely and lavishly (two adjectives which 
seldom equally apply) with smilax and 
flowers. Holly and mistletoe were used in 
this ball room with fine effect. In spite of 
the elegance of the function it was delight- 
fully informal and all the girls found new 
occasion for regret that they were spinsters, for 
only married ladies were invited. 

Mrs. Simon J. Reed has issued invitations 
for a large reception Wednesday, January 11, 
and Miss Orton has sent out cards for a piano 
recital given by Miss Neally Stevens, to be 
followed by a reception for this evening. 

We had a jolly time at the Valley Hunt 
club house New Year's day although on ac- 
count of the weather only a few were present. 
Usually the club has sent out invitations very 
extensively for their New Year's day recep- 
tion, but this year invitations were verbal 
and not so eagerly responded to. We had 
music and dancing and a very pleasant after- 
noon. 

Some of the club members watched the 
old year out and the new year in Saturday 
night at the club house, but Jessica said the 
occasion was scarcely convivial. She com- 
plains that there was nothing to drink but 
ice water and she has doubts about the bless- 
ings a new year will bring ushered in upon 
nothing stronger than ice water. Sometimes 
I fear Jessica is inclined to be gay. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franc L. Grannis, nee Miss 
Edythe Green, are expected at Hotel Green 
this month, and will be at home to their 
friends Mondays in February. 

We all enjoyed a jolly little informal hop 
at Hotel Green last Friday night and are 
anticipating another this evening. There are 
so many pretty girls at the hotel now only 
a few of the Pasadena girls are invited but 
the boys are every time. Boys are born lucky. 

Phyllis. 




*Cbc T)oyqc Show 

■pebruary 1,2,3,4, 1899 

FIESTA Park has been chosen as the site 
for the coming exhibition, and ample 
arrangements are provided for stalls and 
vehicles as well as for the arena and seating 
accommodations all under canvas, with pro- 
visions for heating in case of cold weather. 
The Horse Show managers are fortunate in 
being able to secure so central a location as 
Fiesta Park, and indications point to a large 
attendance the first four days of February. 

Besides the large number of entries already 
mentioned in these columns there have been 
many entries in the classes for horses and 
delivery wagons made by local owners in this 
city. The Horse Show people are especially 
gratified with advices just received from San 
Francisco that the famous Hackney stallion, 
"Green's Rufus," belonging to Mr. John Par- 
rott of San Mateo, will be sent down with the 
horses of Mr. Hobart and others for exhibi- 
tion. Horsemen and all who are up in equine 
matters will know by this that the Los Ange- 
les Horse Show is to have on exhibition prob- 
ably the finest specimen of a Hackney stal- 
lion that is at present owned in the United 
States. 

The polo game between the teams of Bur- 
lingame and Riverside is being arranged for, 
and it is hoped that it may be played at 
Agricultural Park in this city at the time of 
the Horse Show. It will be a game for blood 
as these teams have met several times before, 
and the rivalry between them is keen. 

The private boxes for the Horse Show have 
almost all been sold, and season tickets and 
other tickets will be put on sale about the 
middle of January at the Fitzgerald Music 
House, Spring street, where charts will be dis- 
played and full information furnished. 

REDONDO~~BY _ THE SEA 

AMONG the many fashionable folks that 
frequent this resort there is a fair dame 
with a large family of fairer daughters. She 
is charming to a degree — her daughters are 
likewise. She has an unmistakable air of 
aristocracy about her that is only rivaled by 
her fairer daughters. In the exclusive society 
of Los Angeles she is always a welcome 
guest. In truth there are few swell functions 
that she does not attend. At dinners she ap- 
pears as often, and is seldom absent when any 
of the four hundred marry or are given in 
marriage. She has been gossiped about, it is 
true, — the papers publish her name quite fre- 
quently, but the more of such publicity she 
gets the more society appears to run after her. 
Unkind criticisms have been heard about her 
— "she dresses in too giddy colors," "her 
ever-present perfume is too obvious to be in 
good form," and such like comments have 
been heard, yet still she holds her place 
among the best. 

At a resort like the Redondo Hotel where 
everyone knows what everyone else is doing, 
it is little wonder that her misbehavior should 
be noticed. Scandal is unpleasant to hear — 
that is why society never talks scandal, be- 
sides it is immoral — and society hates immor- 
ality — still if you promise not to tell, you 
shall hear of the latest episode of this much- 
talked-of dame. Well, the other night — now 
promise not to tell — after dark she was seen 



Western Graphic 

with her blushing head — just think of it — on 
a gentleman's shoulder. And the mother of 
a lot of fair daughters, too! Yet there is no 
difference in the reception she gets — for who 
does not admire the beautiful Madame Car- 
nation of Redondo? 

Mr. H. B. Ainsworth has returned to the 
hotel after a stay of two weeks with his family 
in Portland. 

Mrs. Tracey of Salt Lake City is quartered 
at Hotel Redondo for the winter, the beauti- 
ful climate and homelike comforts of the 
hotel tempting her long stay. 

The Chamber of Commerce will hold its 
annual election on Wednesday next and the 
voting will take place at from 9 a. m. to 3 p. 
m. The following gentlemen will be elected 
as there is no other ticket in the field. The 
high standard of the presidency will be ad- 
hered to in the election of J. S. Slauson, who 
may well feel proud of his company and in 
the reflection that such eminent citizens as 
Messrs. Freeman, Patterson, Forman and 
others of like ability and courtesy have pre- 
ceded him. The tremendous work done by the 
Chamber of Commerce during the past two 
years reflects inestimable credit on President 
Forman and all others and can never be fully 
appreciated by the people: 

President — J. S. Slauson. 

First Vice President — M. J. Newmark. 

Second Vice President — A. B. Cass. 

Treasurer — W. C. Patterson. 

Chairman Committee on Commerce — 
Charles Forman. 

Chairman Committee on Manufacturers — 
J. Ross Clark. 

Chairman Committee on Immigration — 
George H. Stewart. 

Chairman Committee on Lands — D. M. 
McGarry. 

Chairman Committee on Mines — H. Haw- 
good. 

Chairman Committee on Ways and Means 
— F. Q. Story. 

Chairman Committee on Statistics — H. S. 
McKee. 

Chairman Committee on Laws — J. W. Mc- 
Kinley. 

Chairman Committee on Membership — E. 
F. C. Klokke. 

Chairman Committee on Hotels — Thomas 
Pascoe. 

Chairman Committee on Parks — Charles 
H. Toll. 



Havilacd China, Cut Glass, Art Goods 
Dinner Sets, Lamps, Sterling Silverware 

Parmelee's 
Retiring 



& 



From business sale affords an except- 
ional opportunity to buyers of Holiday 
Goods. It is here that you will secure 
unusually 



Large 
Discounts 



REMEMBER THE NUMBER 

(Jj5|J ^232-234 SO. SPRING ST. 

LOS ANGELES 
CAL. 




CITY ST K A HI 

Oarpet Cleaning 



Laying, Bordering 
end Kefltl Iiik C ft r- 
pets, Furniture Pack- 
ing, Repairing & Up-, 
holstering. Tel. M 427. 
JOHN BIi OESJfiB 
Office, 456 8. Broadway 



Chocolate Creams 

— Cream Bon Bons 

Largest Assortment cAluoays Fresh 
Glace Fruits Send a box East 
Salted Almonds Fresh every day 




447 So. Spring St. 



{Hatches, Clocks a " d "Jewelry 

Carefully Repaired and Warranted 



Telephone 
...M 1159 



S. ConracU 

Optician, CQatcbtnakcr 

fS Hnd ft 

7'rH-r — 



fine Diamond Setting 

H Specialty... 



1 13 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



A choice asiortment of Diamonds, Jewelry andiWatchos 
always on hand. 



NEW LOCATION 

STOLL & THAYER CO. 

BOOKSELLERS 
STATIONERS 
and ENGRAVERS 

253-254 S. Spring St-B^LOS ANOKLEH 
Stimson Block 1 rhone Main (>49 



7V 



|ngk$ide floral Company & 

f. Bdward 6ray, p rop . 

140 South Spring St 

Telephone Main 568. 

We grow all our flowers and plants at our 
Nurseries at Alhambra. 




Three medals awarded at Hamburg Exposi- 
tion for Gladiolus and Amaryllis. Particu- 
lar description of these and other fine flowers 
originated by us will be mailed on applicatluo. 

Your Face 

■ I Have you Called at 

Ofl helper.. "The Angelo Studio?" qg 

It will pay you if you contemplate giving 
your friends a Foto for Xuias. 

Our work speaks for itself. ^ 
Only High Grade work giver, to our Patrons <^ 

I BYRNE* BUILDING g 

^» Third and Broadway ^ 



NEW STOCK CONSTANTLY ARRIVING 




HAWLEY, KING & CO., ""JSESTL* 



8 



Western Graphic 



<XUtb Our Boys at JMamla 

With the 8th Army Corps, 

Manila, P. t, Nov. 24, 1898. 

A CONCENSUS of events in Manila since 
its capture on the ever memorable 
August 13th, '98, ehows what Yankee ingenu- 
ity, enterprise, capital and military efficiency 
can do for a depressed, gloomy, foul and dis- 
orderly city such as we found Manila. 

Our triumphal entry into the beleagured 
city marks the time when the shackles were 
loosed from hundreds of thousands of op- 
pressed people. We shudder when we listen 
to the tale of persecution (the confiscation of 
properties being the least of these) that was 
meted out to these unfortunates. Oftimes at 
the conviction of friars, many were consigned 
to the Cavite Sea Wall, where in these grue- 
some dungeons they awaited death, which 
came with the rising tide. Doubtless these 
many years these mortals prayed for deliver- 
ance. And methinks I hear them saying, 
" How long, oh Lord, how long?'' Were their 
petitions answered? Most assuredly, and 
to-day the Filippinos look upon the American 
as their savior from further persecution. 

No wonder tha% after years of subjection 
to Spanish tyranny, they have declared that 
they have rights which should be observed. 
They demand the expulsion of the friars and 
the breaking up of religious corporations, 
which have blasted every movement that 
would benefit the people. That all measures 
conducive to the development of the islands' 
natural resources be enforced, and that all 
barriers to commercial enterprises and invest- 
ment of foreign capital shall be removed. It 
seems clear that we will do just such a thing, 
for there are no people who can as effectively 
brush away obstructions. 

But let us see what has been done. On the 
day of entry the city frowned on us, as it were. 
On every hand was stagnation and depression. 
We have caused the cobwebs to be swept down 
and rubbish heaps removed. We saw stagna- 
tion on every hand. Streets cleaned and 
repaired; a sanitary commission appointed; 
pest holes, where disease lurks as a thief in 
the night, gotten rid of. Sunken vessels raised 
and made seaworthy ; scuttled and damaged 
vessels refitted. Piesto! what a change. It 
is not like the place we found. Oh, no; there 
is as much difference as between darkness and 
day. 

Ocean traffic resumed, river steamers, 
launches, cascos, barges, canoes and outriggers, 
laden with everything, from silks to the fisher- 
man's morning catch, cleave the water. Cable 
communication re-established. A newspaper 
appears, " The American Soldier;" soon four 
more are in the field. At our quarters bulletin 
boards are inaugurated, with dispatches from 
the dailies for perusal. 

Two baseball leagues have been organized 
and schedule arranged for inter-regimental 
games. Two cups have been put up as trophies 
for the victors. The joint team, " Utah and 
Third Artillery," bids fair to secure the cup 
offered by the American Commercial Com- 
pany. The drama will be a great feature of 
future entertainment. Nearly all commands 
have organized talent, with many professional 
men on their list. Several successful enter- 
tainments have been held, and thus the holi- 



days, which many mothers' sons intended 
spending with the loved ones, will be merrily 
beguiled. 

Then we must not omit the several literary 
societies. There are at present three such 
organizations. American business signs tell 
us of the numerous business houses now 
"under a new management." The Manila and 
Dagupan railroad has long been in operation. 
The shrieking whistles on every hand tell us 
that business is rushing. The religious side of 
life is by no means neglected. The boys are 
mastering the Spanish tongue. Some of our 
comrades even choosing the future partner of 
their joys and sorrows from among the Philip- 
pine lassies. Tobacco, sugar and hemp fac- 
tories, rice mills, packing houses, etc , are 
running overtime to fill orders. Thus we see 
the push and enterprise of the Yankee ; he is 
sure to make things go. 

Since American occupation of the Philip- 
pines so much has been written descriptive of 
the islands, that it seems like an old, worn-out 
subject. But a few peeps into the mills and 
factories will reveal the great need of up-to- 
date machinery. In the Santiago Rice Mill, 
owned and operated by a Chinaman, a condi- 
tion of things presented themselves that 
showed the need of a thorough renovation. 
Everything was being done in the old, slow 
process, laborious manner, with antiquated 
machinery. When I broached the question of 
new machinery, the proprietor, who spoke 
very good English, said: "My people are 
averse to too much machinery, for it would 
throw too many out of employment. This 
argument no amount of reasoning seems to be 
able to dislodge. 

Likewise in the lumber mills is such a 
condition prevalent. The log that is trimmed 
up in a few minutes by our circular saws, is 
worried over for hours by the men with their 
hand saws. The old style adz is much used, 
and one might see a man chipping away for 
hours trying to fit planks which with our 
tools would require but a few minutes' work. 

There are excellent opportunities for the 
operation of the mineral wealth of these 
islands, said a native to me, now that there 
will be no government obstacles to the develop- 
ment of the natural resources. 

Surely here is a great future. Many are 
the natives who have made fortunes despite 
the exactions by the Spanish authorities and 
crude agricultural implements. There is a 
chance for many a man to make his fortune. 
Likewise is this a good an opportunity to do 
a good stroke for humanity. It is America's 
opportunity; let us hold fast. This has been, 
and is, the natives' opportunity. Through our 
complications with Spain, they have realized 
what they have striven for these many years. 
'Tis true, there are many who sacrificed their 
all on the altar of their country. These will 
live in our loving remembrance. But let us 
think of the hundreds of thousands, yea! mil- 
lions, who to-day wear a brighter countenance 
because of our unselfish devotion to the prin- 
ciple voiced by Jefferson and reaffirmed by 
Lincoln, "that all men are created equal." 
We would fain say: Let us sing to Him who 
hath these great ihings done. 

Our father's God to Thee, 
Author of liberty, 

To thee we sing; 
Long may our lands be bright 
With freedom's holy light, 
Protect us by Thy miuht, 

Great God our King. 

Geo. J. Oden. 



FOR COMMISSIONER TO PARIS- 

MAJ. B. C. TRUMAN has had prepared 
to be filed with Governor Gage an ap- 
plication for the appointment of Commission- 
er from California to the Paris Exposition; or 
if three Commissioners are created, the ap- 
pointment of Commissioner from Southern 
California. The Major has seen much service 
in this line, and has been eminently success- 
ful owing partly to his large acquaintance 
and extensive journalistic experience. Major 
Truman, while editor of the Los Angeles Star 
and Secretary of the Southern District Agri- 
cultural Society, inaugurated a Fair in Los 
Angeles in 1873 and followed it up with three 
others in the falls of 1874-5-6; these were 
small, occupying about the same space as did 
the Chamber of Commerce exhibit when in 




a phiuppinos home 

Mott's Hall, but they served a purpose and 
were quite inviting horticultural, agricultural 
and mechanical expositions, and did a good 
deal toward advertising Los Angeles county 
twenty-five years ago. 

In 1876 Major Truman spent three months 
at the Centennial in Philadelphia, and was 
the honorary Commissioner from Southern 
California and represented this section by 
direction of Governor Pacheco. In 1884-5 he 
was manager of the magnificent exhibit of 
the Southern Pacific Company at the New Or- 
leans Exposition and carried off the grand 
sweep-stakes gold medal and secured a large 
number of medals, diplomas and premiums 
for San Diego, Riverside and Pasadena orange 
and lemon growers, beating Florida at all 
points, that state, with all the prejudices in its 
favor, only getting two premiums. 

In 1887 Major Truman was sent to Lon- 
don by the Southern Pacific Company as 
manager of its exhibit at the American Ex- 
position in that city, and he also conducted 
for several months branch exhibits in Liver- 
pool, Manchester and Birmingham. In 1889 
he was manager of an exhibit of the Southern 
Pacific Company at the Paris Exposition, with 
smaller exhibits in Antwerp and Brussels. In 
1891-2 he was manager of the Southern Cali- 
fornia and Santa Fe exhibit at Chicago, with 
a branch exhibit at Indianapolis six months 
in 1891, and in 1893 he was Assistant Chief 
of Floriculture of the Columbian Exposition. 
In all these places Major Truman put in great 
work, as he is an indomitable worker, and cir- 
culated many parcels of reading matter, hun- 
dreds of thousands at New Orleans, more than 
a million at Chicago, more than half a mil- 
lion in the principal cities of Great Britain. 
Being a newspaper man he manages to so keep 
on the right side of the good fellows of his 



Western Graphic 



9 



c raft as to experience no difficulty in keeping 
his exhibits well spoken of by the press. His 
splendid executive ability and industrial force 
have been highly praised by all those con- 
cerns and sections that have been so fortunate 
as to have commanded his services, and the 
press hereabouts and all others who have 
been acquainted with Major Truman's work 
will undoubtedly endorse him for the appoint- 
meant pplied for. H. R. 

New Year Potpourri. 

What was— 1898. 
At home — 3 to 6. 

Gain and loss — the express company — the 
people. 

A hard proposition — Christmas bills. 
Cigars to give away — the box from your 
wife. 

There's only one 8 in 1-8-9 9. 
Turn a new leaf and look out for blots. 
Have a smoke ? — No thanks, sworn off. 
Midwinter bargains come next. 
Your salary will be raised — when it rains. 
The pawnbroker will soon have a new 
stock. 

Going to pay that bill or plead statute of 
limitation ? 

The women are now busy swapping their 
Christmas gifts. 

The year's final "bone" now in order — 
" Please remit, we wish to close our books." 

A pretty girl — A golden ring — A Christ- 
mas gift from a dear old thing — A great good 
time — A talked of June — Then church bell 
chimes and a honeymoon. 

(From the Clarion Bugle.) — We take this 
opportunity of announcing to the patrons of 
this magazine that we have engaged for the 
ensuing year the services of the well-known 
Mr. Archibaldas Longhead, who has just 
grafted from the village academy with very 
large honors, and whose valedictory, which 
was entirely in verse and nearly two hours 
long, was the wonder and admiration of all 




AN ALFRESCO LUNCHEON OF COCOANUTS 

who had the pleasure of listening to its rendi- 
tion. The professor will act as our proxy at 
all social functions, and will, whenever de- 
sired, recite at each and every wedding, fun- 
eral, party, festival and kindred entertain- 
ment, an appropriate original poem, an 
assortment of which he carries constantly in 
his head. These gems will be entirely gratis, 
presented with the compliments of the Bugle, 
as will also be the natal, heymneal, obituary 
and such like poems, which will, whenever re- 
quested, be appended to announcements in 
this paper. The professor will also be glad at 
any time to provide such of our subscribers as 
have need of them with poetical epitaphs for 
their deceased relations, entirely and wholly 
without cost. In view of this enterprising and 
beneficent action on our part, we hardly need 
add that " now is the time to subscribe." 

C. Bob Syer. 



Book Cbat and Reviews 



BY L. BEHYMER 



Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, 
or we know where to find information on it — Samuel Johnson. 

Here are treasured for daily use, riches which increase by 
being consumed.— r-nngford. 

Take thou thine arms and come with me; 

For we must quit ourselves like men.— Homer's Iliad. 

All may find, if they dare try, 

A glorious life or grave.— Herbert. 

Peace hath higher tests of manhood 

Than Battle ever knew.— Whittier. 

THE holiday business is over and the 
book business is again assuming its nor- 
mal proportions. A visit among the dealers 
showed a very gratifying result from a finan- 
cial standpoint. Probably the book dealers of 
Los Angeles showed more confidence in their 
patrons than any of the other merchants in 
the same line in other parts of the United 
States. Not only did they lay in a new and 
up to date stock of books and notions for the 
Christmas trade, but they purchased by far 
the heaviest stocks ever carried in Los Angeles 
before, and this in the face of the dry season 
and the cry of hard times. That their con- 
fidence was not mis-placed is shown by the 
heavy sales made during the last three weeks 
and particularly the high priced goods, which 
were not only selected but paid for by the ad- 
miring purchaser. 

The call this year seemed to be of a diver- 
sified kind. Better bindings were demanded 
and the representative books of all the well 
known authors in single volumes were selected 
in preference to sets. The old-fashioned flat 
books and table books were discarded and the 
dainty octavos with fine illustrations and ele- 
gant, but not gaudy, bindings were actively 
in demand. 

Books by Richard Harding Davis, F. Mar- 
ion Crawford, Charles F. Lummis, Francis 
Parkman, Theodore Roosevelt, Rudyard Kip- 
ling,Edmund Rostand, A.Conan Doyle, Eugene 
Field, James Whitcomb Riley, R. S. Crockett, 
Anthony Hope, Andrew Lang, Thomas Nelson 
Page, George W. Cable, G. A. Henty, and the 
best known volumes of all the standard auth- 
ors were eagerly sought after. " 

Another feature of the Christmas season 
was the great demand for books pertaining to 
the recent Spanish and American war. In 
Clinton Ross's " Heros in Our War with 
Spain," " The Cuban and Porto Rican Cam- 
paign," by Richard Harding Davis, "Our 
Navy in the Spanish War," by John R. Spear, 
"Our War with Spain by Land and Sea," by 
Charles Morri3, "The Santiago Campaign," 
by Major General Joseph Wheeler, " Yester- 
day in the Philippines," by Joseph Earl Stev- 
ens, " A Gunner on Board the Yankee," by 
Number Five of the After Port Gun, " The 
Cannon and Cam era," " Cartoons of our War," 
etc., e,tc, we find attractive books on this new 
and all absorbing topic. They are well writ, 
ten, well illustrated and what is best, authen- 
tic history; most of them written by men who 
were in the heat of battle, carrying not only 
their gun and ammunition, but an up to 
date kodak and a fountain pen, jotting down 
little items of interest to refreshen the mem- 
ory, making field notes and sketching fortifica- 
tions, and undeniable imprint upon the films, 
proofs which cannot be contradicted, and not 
only are we given a verbal history of the war 
but a photographic history as well. 

Francis Parkman was an author who drew 



and held his readers with that unspeakable 
charm possessed only by a lover of the wild- 
erness. A new and illustrated edition of 
Parkman's works have just been issued by the 
historian's publishers, Little, Brown & Co., in 
which there are twelve volumes with twenty- 
four photogravaure plates from historical por- 
traits and drawings by Howard Phyle, DeCost 
Smith, Thule de Thulestrup, Frederic Reming- 
ton, Orson Lowell, Adrian Moreau and others. 

Authors unworthy of luxurious setting 
have often received it, but here publishers 
adorn what has long adorned them. Golden 
stocks of Indian maize — most American of 
all growths in the western hemisphere — form 
the design on the covers. Many beautiful 
photogravaures bear out the text instead of 
caricaturing it as an author's text is often 
caricatured by illustrations. 

Portraits of Francis Parkman have usual- 
ly accentuated his features and failed to re- 
veal a certain wonderful beauty which, when 
once seen, dwells in the mind forever like a 
rare medallion. The portrait with this edi- 
tion has caught some of that refinement. But 
he was a man whose living face surpassed any 
delineation. 

He estimates that he accomplished about 
one-fourth of what he might have accomp- 
lished with normal health. The output, as it 
stands, completed in spite of physical nervous 
anguish — which would have prevented many 
a man from doing anything except to an- 
nounce his suffering to the world — amounts to 
twelve volumes. These make a finished series 
and they cover the ground which he staked 
out in youth and intended to occupy, which 
few authors have been happier in accomplish- 
ing. And it is the result, not the manner of 
doing, which counts. 

The President of the Munich Academy of 
Art writes Messrs. Stender and Ware, of this 
city: — "Your honors have sent me photo- 
graphs in which you have completely achieved 
your object. My best thanks and best acknow- 
ledgement of the beautiful new process. Wish- 
ing you all success, — D. J. V. Lenbach." 

" The Wave," Phoenix, Ariz., desires a 
purchaser for the only high grade Confection- 
ery and Ice Cream and Soda Parlors in the 
city. Select trade, everything the finest. Best 
of reasons for selling. A bargain. 



The Finest 




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Lowney's Chocolates ^ Gunther's Candies 

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To know what would gladden the hearts 
of your relatives, friends or sweetheart 
on Christmas? If so, come in and see as 
complete a line of 

Diamonds, Watches, 

Silverware and Jewelry 
as can be found west of Chicago, carefully 
selected, and prices that will astonish 
you. We carry only the best. 

\ Geo. R. Cook 

First door west of PHOKNIX, ARIZONA 

Post Dflije... Also Prkscott, Ariz. 

«S-The most complete Optical Department in Arizona. 
Examination and eyts tested free of charge. 



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HOLIDAY COODS 

In (ireat Varietv 

Makes Choosing - Easy 

Fancy Rockers Center Tables 

88.50 to 812.00 81. oo t» 815. oo 
Ladles Desks Combination book cases 
86. Oo to <>•> > i ....... to w:i».oo 

I. T. MARTIN, 531-533 So. Spring IL 




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10 



Western Graphic 




RED tights, snugly filled with supple 
and comely young women; and pink 
tights, as comfortably full of muscular and 
agile men, were the principal attraction at the 
Orpheum this week, no less than four of the 
eight numbers being acrobatic turns. But 
each act was enough different from the others 
and the performances so original that the 
tumbling and balancing and muscleing did 
not stale on the audiences' appreciativeness. 
The three Merkel sisters, in scarlet and tinsel, 
make a bewildering picture when they are all 
turning handsprings at one time, their entire 
act being very graceful and artistic. 

George Evans' clean American humor is 
knocked into a cocked hat with the advent of 
George Fuller Golden, the man who is such a 
friend of one Casey. Mr. Golden is a most 
prolific joker and there is not a dry minute in 
his entire monologue. He evidently thinks it 
necessary to sing at intervals and as the 



orchestra plays once in a while during his 
turn he undoubtedly makes his bluff at vocal- 
ization at those times. 

Julius P. Witmark is a finished and pleas- 
ing singer and is also one of those young men 
that women call handsome. There is more 
merit in his singing than is often heard among 
vaudeville vocalists, and he selects his pieces 
to gain applause from the boxes to nigger 
heaven. 

Paul Batty's bears are one less in number 
this week owing to the cannibalistic nature of 
one of them which prompted it lo chew the 
leg off the baby bear. If Mr. Batty does not 
some time experience the same misfortune at 
the jaws of the ugly brutes it will be because 
he opens a grill room with bears' steaks for 
dejeuner a la fourchette. 



extreme, being -soft, mellow and well 
modulated. And Baby Ethel is the sweetest 
little girl whose childish treble has been heard 
across the footlights for many days. Realism 
in stage setting received a new touch in the 
second act, when the scene was a section of a 
railroad grade in Rocky Gorge, with real rails 
and ties and rocks, and real laborers shovel- 
ing the same kind of dirt that is now engag- 
ing the chain gang's attention in the First 
street cut. 



IT was as if the curtains of the last ten 
years had been raised to see Daniel Sully 
in " O'Brien, the Contractor," and the whole- 
some, old-fashioned melodrama was in pleas- 
ing contrast to the popular " society " dramas 
the morals of which only appear after a dis- 
gusting mass of suggestiveness. As honest 
James O'Brien Mr. Sully portrays a pleasing 

character that 
stirs in men's 
hearts honorable 
impulses (while 
they are listen- 
ing to the'play). 
Mr.Sully,as Mrs. 
Van Buren, is 
just such a wi- 
dow as would 
captivate a man 
instanter. She 
is a charming 
woman and too 
much could not 
be said of her 
voice which is 
pleasing in the 




IT was a wild and woolly performance at 
the Buibank this week, not so wild per- 
haps as it was woolly, and the two or three 
Caucasians in the show looked rather lone- 
some among twenty odd " coons " of various 
ages and colors. It was strictly a vaudeville 
entertainment, the best feature being the 
human frog, an astonishingly limber contor- 
tionist. 

The performance closed with a sure enough 
cake walk, participated in by some cake pedes- 
trians from the local coon town. 

The orchestra succeeded admirably in imi- 
tating a plantation string band throughout 
the entire evening, but it was a great relief to 
musical ears when the quartette work ren- 
dered the assistance of the musicians in the 
pit unnecessary. 



The third entertainment in the Y.M C.A. 
course will be given on next Monday evening, 
January 9th, by the Enterpeon quartette. 
This well known popular musical organiza- 
tion comprises as its members J. P. Dupuy, 
first tenor; F. E. Ney, second tenor; L. Zinna- 
mon, first bass; F. W. Wallace, second bass. 
They will be assisted by Miss Lillie Scanlon, 
contralto, and Miss Teresa Sullivan, pianist. 

Los Angeles Theater— At last the much talked of 
entertainment to be given by the college boys, the 
Glee, Mandolin, Banjo and Guitar club9 of the Uni- 
versity of Southern California is to take place at the 
i-ios Angeles theater next Monday evening, January 
9. Youcg folks, particularly young ladies, have been 
in a flutter of excitement and preparation for the last 
three weeks. 



MONS. ROFIX 

Sensntkmal Chin Balancer— Showing a feat actually to be performed on the Orpheum Stage 




BEN HENDRICKS as "Yon Yonson"— at Los Angeles Theater 



Western Graphic 



11 



The program opens with catchy college songs, 
eulogistic of the football^team, rendered by the Glee 
club. Among these is their "Serenade" and the 
" Kerry Dance." Horatio Cogswell, the basso of the 
Glee club, has a solo, "Sunset," which he delivers 
with a voice of rare strength. He is an excellent per- 
former and ranks well with professionals. 

Probably the star of the company is Cyrus Brown- 
lee Newton, who resembles in appearance somewhat, 
Sir Henry Irving. He is a natural elocutionist and 
has wisely laid in a stock of humorous selections. 
The Banjo club is composed of a double quartette, 
their principal number being new, "The Tyro Ma- 
zurka." Mr. Parcell will present violin solos and Mr. 
Kuster solos on the cello; Mr. A. W. Black on the 
banjo presents "The Overture to William Tell" and 
" My Old Kentucky Home." 



deed be a pleasure and is undoubtedly the best work 
placed before our musical public. The reserved seats 
are now on sale. 



"The School for Scandal."— The great star trium- 
verate, Louis James-Kathryn Kidder and Frederick 
Warde will be the attraction at the Los Ange- 
les theater the week of January 16, in Wagen- 
hals and Kemper's costly and elaborate produc- 
tion of "The School for Scandal." This famous 
old comedy appeals at every point to lovers of 
amusement. It is a satire, and though it was 
produced first over a century ago, so universal 
and permanent is the butt of Sheridan's shafts that 
today the theme and the method are as intimate and 
effective with us as with our ancestors. The main 
personages of the story are a group of scandal-mon- 
gers, a rake of a young fellow with a good heart and 
a prude of a fellow with an evil heart, and a young 
woman who has married an old husband. The char- 
acters are all well sustained by the brilliant coterie of 
players which the management have brought together 
for this important revival of the most perfect spec- 
imen of an acting comedy in the English language. 
During the engagement the three stars will also pre- 
sent Othello, Macbeth, Hamlet J^and Julius Caesar 
The company numbers thirty-two people. 



Orpheum — The crowded houses which the Orphe- 
um has the habit of enjoying will have a rare feast 
of fat things in the vaudeville line next week. Some 
of the richest and most promising features, ever; an- 
nounced for presentation on the Orpheum stage are in- 
cluded in the new bill. The bill is unusually strong 
and well balanced. 

There is, for instance, a trio of the finest com- 
edians — or comediennes— in the land, playing one of 
Gus Thomas' cleverest sketches — Rose Eytinge, Pilar 
Morin and Clement Bainbridge, in the farce "That 
Overcoat." This is the star feature, and a rare, bril- 
liant one. 

Then comes a European importation— Mon. and 
Mme. Refix, the former known as the most remark- 
able balancer in the world. Pianos and other furni- 
ture equally as bulky are perched on his chin and 
held there with admirable skill and strength. Refix 
created a sensation in the big eastern vaudeville 
houses in which he performed before coming to the 
coast. 

Riley and Hughes will give to the bill a da6h of 
merry, negro, old time plantation fun, their powers in 
the line being well known. Their last visit to the 
Orpheum was made several years ago, when they 
made a big hit. 

"The Illusionest King" is Horace Goldin's title, 
and he will demonstrate his right to it on the Orphe- 
um stage next week. His feats are said to be new and 
his chief illusion " The Disappearance of Dreyfus" 
has never been excelled as a trick by an illusionist. 

Geo. Fuller Golden, whose opulent name is like 
his fun — exceeding rich and very delightful — will re- 
main on the bill. His new stories and funny quips 
will be eagerly waited for by Orpheum habitues. 

Julius Witmark, whose sweet songs and sweeter 
voice have charmed all during the past week, is to 
contribute a number of new selections to the program 
in which he will continue a bright particular star. 

The Three Lukens, the most expert acrobats ever 
seen on the Orpheum boards, will repeat their thrill- 
ing performance. 

Paul Batty's bears, trained to do many strange 
tricks and funny capers, have proved so strong an 
attraction that they will be retained for a third week. 

Next Wednesday Manager Myers will give as 
souvenirs at the Wednesday matinee copies of the 
famous play and novel, " Cyrano de Bergerac," to 
each lady present. These souvenir matinees are 
proving tremendously popular. 



Los Angeles Symphony Orchestra— On next Tues- 
day afternoon the fourth concert of the Los Angeles 
Symphony Orchestra will be given. The opening 
number of the program will be the overture in D 
Major (in Italian style) from Schubert. This work 
is in two movements, Adagio and Allegro gusto, the 
latter having an allegro vivace ending. 

The second number is the Intermezzo. Op. 40 
from Bargiel, a brother-in-law of Robert Schumann, 
which, like all of his music, is marked by a careful 
treatment and close finish of a pretty theme. 

The soloist for this occasion is Mr. S. W. Jenni- 
son, who will present Vieuxtemps, " Fantaisie Cap- 
rice." Mr. Jennison is a brilliant violinist.' and will 
undoubtedly do justice to this very beautiful Swiss 
air, which is elaborated and exploited in various 
ways. A feature of the program is the Sixth Sym- 
phony (Pastorale) in F Major by Beethoven. The 
inspiration for this great work was obtained in ram- 
bling through the wooded meadows about Vienna in 
the summer of 1808. 

To those who enjoy an excellent musical program 
this concert as given by our local orchestra will in- 



"Yon Yonson"— " Yon Yonson," which has not 
been here in Bix years, is still no doubt familiar to 
every theatre-goer in Los Angeles, will hold the stage 
at the Los Angeles Theatre for four nights and a 
Saturday matinee beginning next Wednesday night. 
This Swedish farcical drama is something more than 
the ordinary comedy as it possesses the charm of 
originality, the same quality which made the play of 
Fritz, which the elder J. K. Emmett starred, so popu- 
lar for many years In place of the yodling German, 
in this play we find the honest, big-hearted emigrant 
who is shown in a natural manner in the environ- 
ments of his home life. The title role this season is 
in the hauds of Mr. Ben Hendricks, an actor who has 
been more than successful in the impersonation of 
Anglo-Swedish comedy role. 

There is, of course, a story, and it is to the credit 
of Mr. Heege, the author, who has evolved a plot and 
a series of dramatic situations of decidely more 
strength than is usually found in a play of this des- 
cription. A stolen invention, a brother and sister 
separated and brought up in total ignorance of each 
other, are the principal elements of the plot. The 
denoument, of course, restored the invention to the 
rightful owner, reunited the brother and sister with 
a sweetheart for each one. 

The company, besides Mr. Hendricks, includes 
such well known names as Edward J. Mack, Geo. 
Weller, E. H Bender, Annie Mack Berlein, Georgie 
Bryton, Belle Francis, Beatrice Norman, and Ihe 
famous Lumberman's Quartette. 




MASTER GEROME HELMONT 

A Famous Boy Violinist -Master Gerome Hel nont, 
the famous boy violinist, will appear at Simpson 
Auditorium on the evenings of January 26 and 27 
and matinee on the 28th, under the direction of Mr. 
J. T. Fitzgerald. The Musical Courier of August 5 
has this to say of him: "A lad in knee breeches and 
a ruffled collar brought down on his young head a 
perfect avalanche of applause by his viohn playing at 
the auditorium last night. Gerome Helmont is his 
name, and when he stepped into view, his head 
scarcely as high as the grand piano, one had serious 
misgivings, but the soloist soon changed mistrust to 
wonder in his audience. Helmont will be assisted 
by Mibs Grace Preston, contralto, and Miss Ida Sim- 
mons, pianist. 



Burbank— Manager Clark Shaw of the Burbank 
announces a great attraction for appeaiance at his 
theatre beginning with Sunday night. The attrac- 
tion referred to is the young American tragedienne 
Nance O'Neil, and splendid company of legitimate' 
players. The young star will come here under the 
direction of the veteran manager and actor McKee 
Rankin. The past few years have seen a wonderful 
advancement in the career of this bright tragedienne, 
She has won the unstinted applause of the great 
cities of this country and her recent triumph at Hono- 
lulu is still fresh in th? minds of those who keep in 
line with matters theatrical. A great repertoire is 
being presented this season by Miss O'Neil and 
among the superb productions offered are "Eliza- 
beth," "Oliver Twist," "Ingomar," "Leah," "Camilla" 
and "Magda." 

"Elizabeth, Queen of England," will be the attrac- 
tion for the first half of the week. Matinees will be 
given Wednesday and Saturday afternoon. 



MAIN STREET 
BET. FIRST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vandevil) e 
Theater 

Week Commencing Honday, Jan. 9. 

Mme. and Mont. Roflx, in extraordinary feats of strength 
Ulement Bainbridge) Presenting an Up-to-date Koaring 

Pilar Morin > Farce, Augustus Thomas' One-Act 

i;<>.«^ Kytinge J Comedy, " Hint. 1 ivercoat" 

<;<!(>. K uller Golden , Uie Peer of all Monologuisis 
Horace Goldin, the Man of Mystery 
Kiley and Hughe*, Negro Impersonators 
Julius P. Witmark, America's Sweetest Singer 
Three Lukens, Acrobatic Marvels 

Paul Hatty's Acrobatic Hears, Novelty of the Century 
EVENING 25 and 50 cts, gallery 10c. Matinees Wednesday 
Saturday and Sunday, any seat in the house 25c 




T) URBAN K THEATER 

I J Main St., but. Fifth and Sixth. Tel. H 1270 

"-^ O. A. SHAW, Lessee 

Commencing Sunday, January 8. 

8 NIGHTS Wednesday «nd Saturday Matinees 

The Young American Tragedienne, 

NANCE O'NEIL 

(Direction McKek Rankin) 
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday— 
" KLIZABETH, QUEEN OF ENGLAND " 

Wednesday Matinee "INGOMAR" 

Thursday, Friday, Saturdav— Sir Walter Scott's Classic 
" GUY MANNERING" 
Saturday Matinee—" INGOMAR " 
PRICES— 15c, 25e, 35c, 50c; Loge Seats, 75c; Box Seats, SI. 00. 

OS ANGELES THEATER M « 

C. M. WOOD, and H. C. WY ATT, Lessees. 
FOUR NIGHTS, commencing Wednesday, Jan. 11. 
Bargain Matinee Saturday. 
The Everlasting Success, 

THE GREATEST OF 

ALL SWEDISH 
COMEDY SENSATION 
Popular I'rices— 25c, 50c, 75c, SI. 00. Matinee 25c and 50c. 



ion wmm 



OS ANGELES THEATER 



fC. M. WOOD 
I H. 0. WYATT 



Lessees 



ONE NIGHT ONLY-MONDAY, JAN. 9. 
A Night of Fun and Music. 

R/1TT 2F ^dUFORNlId 

Grand Holiday Concert Tour. 

Ha! Ha! Ha! California! U.C. Berkeley! Zip! Boom! Ah! 
Seats now on sale. Prices 25c, 35c. 50c, 75c, $1.00. Tel. Main 70. 

T OS ANGELES THEATER 

I . The Most Perfect Acoustics of any Building in the Ci ty 
Tuesday Afternoon, Jan. 10th, at 3.15 o'clock 

Fourth Concert of the i-eason 1898-99, given by the Los Angeles 

SYFW1MPY ©lOTOTM 

Haui.ky Hamilton, [fft/1 Mb - s - W - J kn nison, 

Director W Soloist 

Season Tickets, good for 20 admissious with preferred re- 
served seats, $10 00; Single Admission, 25c; Reserved Seats, 50c. 
Seats now on sale. T el. Main 70. 

Ring up Western Graphic by telephone, Main 
1053, and ask for the city circulator to call upon you. 
You pay the money— we take all the trouble off your 
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LOS ANGELES » 




12 



Western Graphic 




CHAPTER X. 
In the garden Roxaue waited for her 
friend. She bent over ber embroidery 
frame and watched the sisters bring the 
armchair where he was wont to sit be- 
side ber. 

"He's late," she said. "What can it 
be? My faithful 'Court Gazette' behind 
his time after so many years? The por- 
tress keeps him — preaching how to save 
his sonl. Ah, yes, that must be it!" 

She played with her needle, scanned 
the sky, mused, smiling, on his good- 
ness to her, fumbled in her workbag for 
her thimble, frowned at her pattern, 
tapped her foot impatiently, then re- 
solved to work and began her stitching. 
Still the minutes dragged by, and be 
did not appear. 

"M. de Bergerac, " at last announced 
a little sister, coming up behind her. 

"At last," said Roxane. She did not 
turn or raise her eyes. Some faint co- 
quetry even in that she called her 
friendship bade her play thus with him. 
Besides bis coming was the punctual 
coming of the sun, and she took it with 
the same calm habit. She searched 
among her silks as she spoke to him. 

"You're late I The first time in all 
these years. " 

Cyrano's face was very white. He 
had walked toward her stifliy, as one 
holds himself who fears to fall. Each 
step was taken with a pulling at the 
legs. His hat, jammed low upon his 
face, concealed a bandage round bis 
bead. 

■ "I was staid," he apologized in a 
voice he could control with difficulty, 
"by a most unwelcome visitor." He 
spoke jokingly and with assumed play- 
fulness, but he seemed to wrench the 
Words out from his chest by jerks, as he 
bad pulled himself along to where she 
sat. 

"Some creditor?" said Roxane lightly. 

"The last creditor who has a debt to 
collect from mel" 

"Ah, fortunate man, so nearly clear 
of debt ! And is it paid?" 

"Not yet. I bade him wait. I said I 
bad a rendezvous which nothing should 
defer. I told bim to call again in just 
an hour." 

"A creditor can always wait, " said 
Roxane airily. "You shall not leave me 
until twilight time. But what's the 
matter? Yon have not teased Sister 
Martha?" 

Sister Martha was walking by. Cyra- 
no called to her. Then he rages at her 
with burlesqued fury for ber so called 
preaching at him. But bis teasing lack- 
ed its old ring, and suddenly he said: 

"Listen, sister! I give yon leave to 
prav tor me tonight at chapel time." 

"I have not waited your permission 
to pray for yoa, "said she, smiling, and 
walked on. A light breeze causes the 
yellow leaves to come showering down. 
Cyrano watched Roxane's fingers over 
her embroidery. 

"I'll never see it finished," he said. 

"Ab! I knew that time worn jest 
would come," laughed Roxane. Then a 
silence fell between them, broken only 
by the swirling of the leaves. 

"My 'Court Gazette' seems dull to- 
day," she ventured finally. 

With a great effort Cyrano forces 
back his faintness. "Ah, yes, to be 
(ure, " he laughed. "Well, listen. On 
Saturday, the 19th, having eaten to ex- 
cess of peach preserves, the king felt 
feverish, but the doctor, with his lancet, 
Boon, quelled the treasonable revolt. The 
»ugust pulse now beats normal. At the 
nueen's ball on Sunday thirtyscoreof the 



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very best while wax tapers were "buruoS 
ip. Our troops, they say, have chased 
the Austriaus. Four sorcerers were 
banged. The little dog of Mme. d'Athis 
took a dose" — 

"M. de Bergerac!" cried Roxane, 
with mock sternness, "I bid you bold 
your tongue, sir I" 

"Monday," went on Cyrano, growing 
whiter and whiter, "not much took 
place. Claire changed protectors. Tues- 
day the court repaired to Fontaiueblean. 
Wednesday the Montglat said to Comte 
de Fiesque" — 

But suddenly his eyes close; his voice 
breaks, and his bead falls forward. He 
had fainted in his chair. In alarm Rox- 
ane ran toward him.- 

"It's nothing," he said, recovering 
himself. "My old wound — got at Arras 
— it still troubles me." He smiles with 
an effort. 

"Ah, both of us were wounded there, 
and both still bear the marks of our 
hurt," said Roxane. "I have his letter 
still above my heart." 

"Yon said that some day I should 
read it." 

"And so you shall today. See, here 
it is, hung in this bag. Open it and 
read." 

"I have your leave to read it now?" 
he asked, holding it tenderly with a 
queer smile about the corners of his 
ashy lips. 

"I should like to hear you read it," 
she said softly 

The smile deepened, but it was not 
all a smile. It was a long regret, a 
memory and an adoration blent in one 
look. He opened it and looked on Chris- 
tian's last words to his wife. 

On Cyrano's face the tender light 
deepened. Roxane watched him with a 
curious eagerness. From the chapel 
came the full notes of the organ. The 
purple twilight began to gloom among 
the golden tinted leaves. 

"Roxane, farewell!" read he in a 
voice that pulsed with feeling. Then 
he repeated it: 

"Roxane, farewell I Death waits for me— 
This very night he claims me, dear, 

And all my soul, bowed with the weight 
Of love untold, feels him draw near." 

"How you read it!" cried Roxaue. 
But Cyrano did not hear. He was read- 
ing with his heart, full of the 6tored 
love of years: 

"I die. I never more shall watch 
With wistful eyes the quiet grace 

With which you more your hand to brush 
Your little curls or touch your face." 

The purple deepened into black about 
them. Roxane waited. Still he read 
on: 

"I cry to you, my dear, my sweet 1 
Not once has my heart swerved, my own. 

And 1 am ho who now— and then— 
Beyond the stars— is yours alone." 

His voice rang out, triumphant, glo- 
rious. The letter rested in his hand. 
Roxane touched him. It had come to 
her like a great revelation. 

"Yon read the letter yon had never 
seen, and look — it is too dark to see!" 

"Roxane!" he cried, with a great 
start. 

"For J5 years you've played this 
part, the kind old friend who comes to 
laugh and chat. Ah, blind that I was! 
I should have known, I should have 
felt yonr voice each time he spoke my 
name I" 

"Roxane!" cried Cyrano again, past 
all other Epeech. 

"Those words of fire and honey dew 
— all yours, all yours! The voice that 
thrilled my jasmine vine to me — yours. 



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13 



fours! Tour soul, your soiif iiffvery- 
Ihing!" 

"Indeed, indeed it is not so," pro- 
tested he. "It was your husband." 

"You loved me!" cried Roxane. 

"I loved you not!" 

"See how you falter!" 

"No, no, my dear! I swear I never 
loved you. " 

" Your letter and your tears I've worn 
above my heart — the letter every word 
of which was yours." 

"But all the blood stains his." 

"Why did you keep such silence? 
Why?" begged Roxane. 

Cyrano hesitated, and while she look- 
ed to him for answer through the gates 
there broke Raguenean and Le Bret. 

"Madman!" cried Le Bret. "Ab, 
inadame, pardon me, but he has court- 
ed death by coming here." 

"True!" laughed Cyrano. "I forgot. 
The chronicle was never finished. Here 
s an item — 'On Saturday at dinner time 




TO THE BITTEK END CYRANO JKSTfc. 

:he assassination of De Bergerac. ' Mark 
port my bandages!' 

He took his hat off, and for the first 
time Roxane saw the hrndaged head. 
Half wild, she begged for enlighten- 
ment. 

"All that I asked or hoped," said 
Cyrano, "was but to die a hero's death 
— 'a point upon my lip, a point within 
my heart.' And see! I am struck down 
by a footman from the rear. Mocked, 
even in death ! There, Raguenean ! Why 
Weep you so? Come, come! What is it 
yon do now?" 

"I trimmed the lights for Moliere's 
stage," sobbed Ragueneau, "but I'll 
do so no more; but yesterday he brought 
on 'Scapin' — and a whole scene was 
pours — the one beginning 'Que diable 
allait — ilfaire. ' Ah! How they laugh- 
ed!" 

"That was life, " said Cyrano. "To 
be the one who prompted them and 
tvhom they all forget. Roxane, do you 
recall the night when Christian talked 
to you beneath your balcony? Ah, well ! 
That was the story of my whole life 
there. While I stood low, deep in the 
shadow, the others climbed to snatch 
the kiss of glory. 'Tis justice, and here 
upon my grave's dim sill I approve it. 
Moliere's genius, Christian's beauty." 

Down the chapel alleyway the sis- 
ters, darkly seen through the afterglow, 
walked. The chapel bell rang. 

"Sister !" cried Roxane, starting to- 
ward them. 

"Nay!" pleaded Cyrano. "Do not go 
for any one. When you came back, I 
should be gone. Listen! The organ 
plays!" 

"I love yon!" cried Roxane. "Live, 
live for me I" 

"Nay!" smiled Cyrano sadly. "In 
fairy tales alone do tho ill starred grow 
beautiful when at tho end the lady 
says, '1 love yon!' I, you see, am the 
same up to tho last!" 

"I made your misery. I — I" — 

"You made my happiness. I never 
knew the sweetness of a woman's love. 
My mother could not find me fair. I 
never had a sister. Later I feared a mis- 
tress would but mock at me. But I have 
had a friend. Grace to you, a woman's 
robo has fluttered in my life!" 

"I loved but once," cried Roxane, 
"yet twice I must lose my love!" 

The moon came up through the 



branches. Cyrano looked at It, but Rox- 
ane looked on him. 

"Tonight," he smiled with whim- 
sical remembrance, "I'll make my lunar 
trip with no projectile's aid. There they 
will send uib for my paradise. More 
than one son! I have loved is there in 
exile. I shall find again — Galileo, Soc- 
rates — Come, come, you weep! Le 
Bret, you used to scold me. What? Ah, 
yes! Cadets of Gascony are there ! Co- 
pernicus has said" — 

"Oh," wailed Roxane, "I cannot 
bear it!" 

"Mais que diable allait — il faire en 
cette galire?" he raved on. 

"Philosopher, physician, versifier and 
musician. Made an aerial expedition 
and many famous duels fought. Lover, 
too — after a fashion. Here lies Hercule 
Savinien de Cyrano de Bergerac — a bit 
of everything, yet naught!" 

He fell exhausted in his chair. He 
raised his eyes to Roxane and seemed 
again himself. 

"Be not less faithful to his memory," 
he said, "buti wear your weeds for two. " 

"I swear id. " 

His glazing eyes were fixed upon the 
trees. He started to his feet. They 
rushed to hold him, but he waved them 
back. 

"It comes, " he said. "I feel my feet 
shod with marble, my hands gloved 
heavily with lead. But not here, sitting 
— no, standing, standing to the last, let 
me meet him — standing and sword in 
band!" The old soldier raised his 
weapon defiantly. 

"Cyrano!" cried Roxane, half faint- 
ing. But he did not hear her. His eyes 
were still fixed straight ahead. 

"He looks upon my nose! The impu- 
dent! What's that you say: It's useless? 
Ah, I know it. But no one fights for 
mere success. No, no! It is more beau- 
tiful because it's fruitless. Who are 
you, there, you thousands? I know you, 
every one. All my old enemies. Ah, 
Falsehood, there! Have at you! Have 
at you!" — his sword was aimed at the 
shadows. "And you, old Compromise? 
And Prejudice and Treachery! See how 
I strike you! Treat with you? Never! 
And you there, too, Folly, you: I al- 
ways knew that at the end you'd throw 
me to the earth. What matters it? I 
fight, I fight. I fight you still!" 

They watched him strike at his old 
foes, the few who loved him, seeing 
him moment by moment growing weak- 
er. He stopped, breathless. Then, after 
a pause, he went on: 

"Yes, you have snatched from me 
the laurel and the rose. Take all ! In 
spite of you there is one thing, one 
thing, I bear, and when tonight I enter 
into heaven and make obeisance at the 
threshold, one thing without a crease — 
without a stain — I bear away with me 
in spite of you. " 

In the moonlight they strained their 
eyes to see him. They listened, holding 
their breath for the last word. 

"And that — and that?" whispered 
Roxane. 

He fell back into Le Bret's outstretch- 
ed arms. His sword falls fiom his hand. 
But through the blue and silver of the 
night she saw his smile. She bent over 
him. She kissed his forehead. She 
whispered once again: 

"And that?" 

"And that," he answered, smiling 
into her eyes, "is my soldier's p! t;.:.e, 
unstained. " 

THE END. 

Putties desiring tlie complete Mies of WESTERN 
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14 



Western Graphic 



NO HAZING AT PRINCETON 
Students decide that the Practice Must 
Cease 



The wave of reform that has been 
passing over Princeton nniversity reach- 
ed a culminating point the other night 
at a mass meeting of undergraduates in 
Alexander hall. It was voted that haz- 
ing in all its forms mnst forever cease. 
The students took this action of tbeir 
own accord, without any promptings 
from the faculty. Since 1894, when the 
faculty forced the issue by threateuing 
to expel several of the best football play- 
ers unless hazing were stopped, thereby 
hazarding Princeton's chances in the in- 
tercollegiate contests, tber« has been no 
hazing at Princeton of the brutal type. 
Recently roving bands of sophomores, 
with plenty of time on their hands, have 
never missed an opportunity of dodging 
the proctors and dropping in unexpect- 
edly on some unsophisticated freshman, 
who perhaps had been making himself 
unduly conspicuous, and putting him 
through a series of harmless "stunts," 
such as doing a 6ong and dance, making 
a speech extolling his own virtues or 
cheering for the sophomore class. 

The recent snowstorm brought great 
joy to the sophomores. In accordance 
with a time honored, unwritten law 
they are permitted to snowball the 
freshmen, who have no right to retali- 
ate. Every day, from the time the bell 
rang for morning chapel until after the 
last recitation at night, the sophomores 
have been hard at it, pursuing the help- 
less freshmen, not even allowing them 
to take their meals in peace. The second 
year men upheld the old custom so rig- 
orously that they overreached them- 
selves, and the new conditions of under- 
graduate life at Princeton are directly 
traceable to tho early snowstorm 

The movement originated with the 
senior and junior classes, who appointed 
a committee to draw up a set of resolu- 
tions outlining the prerogatives of the 
lower class men, their relations with one 
another and providing for an under- 
graduate court to try cases and pro- 
nounce penalties. The resolutions were 
then presented to the freshman class and 
were adopted with a rush that left no 
doubt as to the downcast state of the 
freshmen's feelings. When the resolu- 
tions were submitted to the sophomores 
at a meeting the other day, there was a 
good deal of opposition shown. Whether 
the better element in the class predomi- 
nated or whether the majority of the 
class had sore arms and therefore could 
not snowball is not known, as the meet- 
ing was secret, but the resolutions were 
adopted and were enthusiastically rati 
fled at the mass meeting the other night. 
The resolutions, which will be enforced 
with all the vigor that characterizes the 
honor system in examinations, are as 
follows: 

"Inasmuch as the custom of basing in 
all of its forms is a demoralizing prac- 
tice, involving an unreasonable and in- 
tolerable interference on the part of one 
student in the rights and privileges < f 
his fellow student, and inasmuch as tbis 
practice has been carried to an uuwar 
ranted and baneful extreme, endanger- 
ing thereby tho position and standing of 
certain men who are already members 
of the university and exerting a must 
damaging influence on the university's 
interest and reputation in the outside 
world; therefore, we would recommend 
that all forms of hazing be abolished 
entirely and that the students in mass 
meeting assembled declare themselves 
in full sympathy with such a movement 
and promise their co-operation and sup- 
port in enforcing these resolutions. In 
carrying out tbis purpose we would sug- 
gest that the following method be pur- 
sued: 

"First. — At the first meeting of the 
freshman class the chairman of the com- 
mittee hereinafter provided for shall an- 
nounce that while the sentiment of the 
university is opposed to hazing, yet the 
freshman class will be expected to ob- 
serve the university's usual customs. 

"Second. — It will be understood that, 
aside from an insistence of the enforce- 
ment of the time honored college cus- 
toms by the processes hereinafter nro- 



viaea for, any molestation or intimida- 
tion of or dictation to the members of 
the freshman class on the part of the 
sophomores shall he considered hazing. 

"Third. — Members of all classes 
shall have the right to appeal to the 
committee hereinafter provided for for 
the enforcement of these resolutions, in- 
cluding an observance of the customs 
in any particular instance that may 
come before their notice. 

"Fourth. — There shall be a commit- 
tee on hazing, composed of the follow- 
ing five persons: The vice presidents of 
the two upper classes, the editor in 
chief of The Princetouian and the 
manager and assistant manager of the 
baseball team. The duties of this com- 
mittee shall be to decide all questions 
arising in the interpretation of these 
resolutions. They shall summon before 
them all members of the freshman class 
who are accused of violating the terms 
of these resolutions, investigate the 
charges brought against them, and if 
they are found guilty shall decide upon 
the punishment to be inflicted. They 
shall also summon before them all 
members of the sophomore class acoused 
of violating the terms of these resolu- 
tions, investigate the charges, and if the 
sophomores are found guilty shall refer 
the case with all evidence bearing upon 
it to the faculty. They shall summou 
before them all men whoso testimony is 
desired in the consideration of cases. 
These resolutions shall go into effect 
immediately upon their adoption." — 
New York Sun. 



Stories of Lite in the West. 
Tales of Travels in Many Land3. 



< a in era Discovers* n Now Comet 

Special preparations were made at the 
Yale observatory on Prospect hill in 
New Haven to photograph the recent 
meteoric showers. Four cameras were 
set and plates were exposed for three 
hours each night. No good picture was 
obtained until Nov. 22, when the sky 
was clear. After developing the picture 
Dr. Chase, the astronomer, noticed a 
peculiar looking star, surrounded by a 
sort of nebular haze. Tbis he at once 
suspected was a comet and telegraphed 
to the Harvard observatory and the Lick 
observatory. The astronomers there on 
looking over their pictures of the mete- 
oric shower found the same peculiar 
looking star and agreed with Dr. Chase 
that it was a comet. Dr. Chase says the 
comet is ahout twice as far away as the 
suu aud is moving rapidly toward the 
earth When the comet was discovered 
on tho picture, it could not be seen 
through the telescope. The camera fo- 
cused on the same spot for three boors 
caught it. — New York Journal. 

Ui« New South Wales Wheat Crop. 

According to the official forecast from 
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For Jan. 8, 1899 



Read the Illustrated Magazine. 

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A Daughter of the Changeless 
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A charming story of life in the San Fran- 
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The Story of the Turquoise King. 

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The Lone Woman of San Nicolas. 

Strange story of a barren island filled with 
interesting relics; by S. J. Mathis. 

Some Historic Landmarks of Los 
Angeles. 

Rel;cs of the romantic days of Spanish 
dominion in California; by W. A. Corey. 

Water Supply of Southern Cali- 
fornia. 

How an adequate quantity may be stored 
for irrigation; by F. N Koebig. 

Nance O'Neil in Honolulu. 

Cordial hospitality and pretty customs in 
the Paradise of the Pacific; by Nance 
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What the Light of Asia Means to 
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An Indian sage interprets the mystic 
words of Sir Edwin Arnold; by Siddi 
Mohammet Ta'eiber. 

The Way of the Trespasser. 

How two travelers in the Transvaal los t 
their supper; by P.- Y Black. 

San Antonio and the Alamo. 

Present impressions and past traditions 
in Texas; by Stephen Crane. 

Droll Doings in the Antilles 

Where beggars ride horseback and coftl is 
are for rent; by Henry Harrison Lewis. 

Strange Customs of the Argentines 

Kxperiences of an American in the land 
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Woman and Home. 

Pretty Lingerie — American women 
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Our Boys and Girls. 

Coasting for Life— A storv of adventure in 
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EDM0ND ROSTAND 
fhe Career of the Brilliant Young Author 
of "Cyrano" 
Edmoud "Rostand, the 'Parisian play- 
wright, who has suddenly ehed the 
light of bis genius over the entire 
world, is still r» yonng man. At the age 
of 81 be has stopped forward and swept 
D'Ennery, Scribe and Sardon aside as 
literary flies. Fame and fortune came 
to him veritably in one night, for it 
was his dramatization of the life of 
Cyrano de Bergerao which placed him 
at once among the foremost French 
dramatists. Before the production of 
bis "Cyrano" in Paris M. Rostand wao 
known as the author of three insignifi- 
cant plays, none of the.m revealing the 
power which he wae to 6how in his 




EDMUND KOSTANO. 

latest production. When M. Rostand 
was bnt 20 years of age, "Le Gaut 
Rouge,' bis first play, was performed 
at the Theatre Cluuy in Paiis, but with 
little success. Six years later his "Les 
Romanesques" was acted at the Theatre 
Francaise. Abont the same time, too, 
Mile. Sarah Bernhardt appeared in an 
overetberealized romantic drama, en- 
titled "La Piiucesse Leontaine, " and 
made very little impression on dramatic 
Paris. If. Rosland persevered, however, 
aud wrote a second play for Mile. Bern- 
hardt, which was received with consid- 
erable favor. This was "La Samari- 
taiue. " 

Then came "Cyrano. " Coquelin took 
the title role, and after its first per- 
formance its author was given the cross 
of the Legion of Honor. Parisian critics 
said that a peer of Victor Hugo had at 
last been found. A quarter of a million 
copies of the drama were quickly snatch- 
ed up by eager Parisians. The play was 
taken to the provinces, then to Eng- 
land, where its initial success was re- 
peated. Certain English critics even 
affirmed that "Cyrano" was equal to 
tbe l est work of Corneille, Racine and 
Moliere, The success of the play in 
America is already well known. 

M. Rostand is at present in Vienna 
collecting material for a new drama, 
which is being written under contract 
for Mile. Sarah Bernhardt. Hie profes- 
sion, by the way, was never a necessity 
to tbe young playwright, as bis family 
is both wealthy and distinguished. Not 
long ago be married Mile. Rosemonde 
Lee, a poetess, who takes a great inter- 
est in all her husbaud's work, and re- 
vised for him the proofsheets of "Cy- 
rano de Bergerac. " 



Annual Statement 

'" We have during the year 
just closing disposed of more 
Wall Paper than any other 
house in Southern California. 

Walter Bros. 
62? so. spring street 

Tel. Main 1055 



Western Graphic 



15 



FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 



Western 




TpSn ilia. stoat r/B. .tveekit- joCti: 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
3 i 1-3 13 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Entered at the postoffice in Los Angeles as second-class mail matter. 
SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. Single 
Copies, Five Cents: Edition de Luxe, per Copy, Ten Cents. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

We Solicit Contributions of Short Stories and Articles of Interest about Southern 
California, which we will pay for at our regular rates. The usual 
rules regarding Anonymous Contributions and 
Rejected Mss. will be observed. 



Cos flitaeles terminal Ry. 1 




THE 

TOURISTS' 
FAVORITE 
ROUTE . . 



Mount Lowe 
Santa Catalina Island 
Long Beach 
San Pedro'^ 



The Only Line passing through Long 
Beach with a picturesque six-mile ride 
along the Sea Shore going to Santa Cata- 
lina. Positively first-choice of Steamer ac- 
commodations. No delays. No transfers. 

To Mount Lowe Trains pass tbrough beautiful Pas- 
adena and the San Gabriel Valley. No change 
of cars, au advantage* not secured on other lines. 

Telephone M. 960 

Excursion Tickets on Sale Every Day 

CITY TICKET OFFICE, 214 SO. SPRING ST. 

S. B. HYNES, Gen. Agt. T. C. PECK, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 



® Tickets 



to the 



i§3 



Horse Show... 




JAMES J. HILL. 
James J. Hill, who has achieved fame as the head of the Great Northern railway, 
has acquired a controlling interest in the Baltimore and Ohio. "Jim" Hill is, to use a 
hackneyed phrase, a self-made man. By industry and courage he raised himself from 
an humble position in railroading to the place iu the first rank which he now holds. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 



Si 



Si 

m 



Everybody who has One dollar to spend will 
take someone and go to the Horse Show. 

Western Graphic 

Will give to each new six-months subscriber 

A Present of Two Tickets to the 
Horse Show 

Think of it ! Twenty-six issues of the finest 
illustrated paper on the Pacific Coast and two 
SO-cent tickets to the show for $1.00. Call at or 
address 



Tel Main 1053 



Geo. Rice & Sons (inc.) 

311-313 New High St. 



I BADE IVIARKS 

Designs 
Copyrights &c 

Anvone sending a sketch and description mny 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions at rictly conlidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice^ without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. L.nreest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, a 
year: four months, $1. Soldbyall newsdealers. 

IV1UNN & Co. 361Broadwa v New York 

Branch Office, C25 F St., Washington. D. C. 



These two figures represent two pets formerly 
belonging to abnf.r L Ross the owner of tne 

HOTEL ROSSLYN 

on Main street opposite the Post Office iu 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Mr. Bear was kept at his summer tome at Deer 
Lodgeiip in the mountains of Tennessee — .Mrs 
Al I. Gator was kept in his Lake at his former 
winter home in luterlacheu, Florida; but Mr 
Hoss has adopted Los Ange.es, (al as his future 
home and may ship a lot of Aligators here as 
presents for our Elysian Park. 



Main Street Savings Bank 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts. 
Temple Block 



CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

A PITA L STOCK PAID UP 100.000 



Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 



T. L. DUQUE President 

[. N. VAN NUYS Vice-President 

B. V. DUQUE Cashier 

Directors — H. W. Hellman, Rasper Cob. 11, H. 
W. O'Melveny, J. B. Lankershim, O. T. Johnson, 
T. L. Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. G. Kerckhoff, A. 
Haas. 



Oldest and Largest Bank in Southern 
California 



ts 



J. W. FULLER 



DEALER IN 



WATCHES, CLOCKS, f 
JEWELRY, SILVERWARE and j) 
OPTICAL GOODS f 



A good line of Holiday Novelties 



315 NORTH MAI 

Opp Farmers and Merchants Bank. 



Simon MaierJ 

Wholesale 4 
Butcher and J 
Packer a 



Telephone Main 155 J 

149-151-153 N. Spring Street f 



OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) 8500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total »1,426,742 

OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

G. HEIMANN Assistant Cashier 



DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry C. E. Thom A. Glassell 

0. W. Childs I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 

J. F. Francis II W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 



^-Special Collection Department. Our safety 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent in its t ew fire and burglar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 



Co F. 



and CJne:mist 



222 N. Main St., Lanfranco Blk. 



W. II. Pkury. Pres. W. A Morgan, Sec 

S. H. Mott, Vice-President. 

W. H. Perry 
Lumber 
and Mill Company 

Agents for the 

St. Paul and Tacoma Lumber Co., Tacoma, Wash 

B ffi» MINING TIMBERS 

Correspondence Solicited 

136 Commercial St. Los Angeles, Jal, 



'fill 




THET! WILL HAVE A MILLION EACH. 

The three daughters of Ah Fong, Miss Bessie, Miss Carrie and Miss Marie, who 
oorue from Hawaii, are attractive young women and the fact that their father gives 
each of his girls .51,000,000 as a marriage dowry will not h-ssen the interest that is felt 
in them. They have soTcn married sisters, each of whom has heen given the million dot. 



McCALL'S PATTERNS 10C and 15c. 




Elegant Wraps Reduced 

We offer some very elegant Wraps for carriage and street, at 
prices which are one-fourth less than the same goods sold for last 
week. The Capes are of beautiful black velour, embroidered with 
silk braids and jets, lined with plain black or exquisite fancy 
ombre plaid French taffeta silks. 
Prices as follows: 

$40.00 Capee reduced to $30.00 

$50.00 Capes reduced to $35.00 

$75.00 Capes reduced to $50 00 

Also some beautiful plain Beaver and Covert Cloth Jackets, 
in the new shades of blue and green, at greatly reduced prices. 



317-325 SOUTH BROADWAY 

Laugfhlin Building 



We 
To know 



i something more about the details and tectani- 
f ff |1 T calities of printing than you — don't you think? 
\J II fill I In our experience we have seen thousands of 
dollars wasted through the ignorance of cus- 
tomers on apparently trivial points. People 
have come to us with specifications upon which 
they wished us to estimate. Most printers 
would make the figure as requested, and, if the 
lowest bidder, go ahead with the work, on a basis of waste from beginning to 
end. We always try to explain these points to a prospective customer, but 
have had men go out mad, because, as they said, we "questioned their ability 
to decide what they wanted." But we have made many more friends than 
enemies, and will continue that policy. Believing that many will appreciate 
the advantages of obtaining the benefit of our experience and close touch with 
the advertising world, we have established an 

ADVISORY DEPARTMENT. 

This is in charge of an experienced advertising man, who has the co-operation 
of the heads of the printing departments. For the small fee of $i.oo he will 
take up any proposition in relation to advertising and the printing of advertis- 
ing matter, and advise you as to the probable result of the advertisement, make 
out specifications as to paper, type, ink, size, binding, etc., furnish dummies 
and samples, and give such other information as may come within the scope of 
his training. This department is entirely outside of our printing business, 
though we will, of course, be pleased to furnish you estimates if you request it. 

It may pay you to consult this department, even on your office stationery, 
and a simple statement from you that you are not satisfied with your invest- 
ment will bring back your dollar. 

Address: 

GEO. RICE & SONS (Inc.). 

3' I "3 I 3 New High Street, 
Advisory Dept. Los Angeles, Cal. 



The Grand Glen wood 



Is unquestionably the most complete range 
ever made. The beautiful carved design is 
acknowledged to be the highest order of orna- 
mentation ever put on a stove. Prominent 
features of convenience and utility brought 
forth in this range are: Patent Oven Heat In- 
dicator, Double Oven Top, Perfected Oven 
Damper, Sectional Oven Bottom, Ventilated 
Oven, Stamped Oven Door Lining, Nickel 
Oven Door Lift, Large Swing Broiler Door, 
Large Round-Cornered Fire Box, Draw Center Grate Extra Large Water 
Front, all Nickel Plates Ventilated. 



We are Sole Agents for these Ranges. 




JasW.HELLMAN 



157-161 

N. SPRING ST. 



Siircexaor to W. O. Ft'KKKT CO. 



Malleable 
Iron Beds 




You can drive 1 he rails down with a 
hammer without danger of breaking, 
thus making a perfect joint. 



The Best Value Ever Offered 

^^^M,^ Jig 



At 439=441 South Main Street 

OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 



NEW FIRM 
NEW 

MANAGEMENT. 



City Dye and 
Cleaning Works 




345 



It looks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit 



South Broadway 

We Use the Improved Dry Process and 
Clean Everything from an . . . 

EVENING DRESS 
to a NECKTIE •^W)-^9iS^ > 

Positively No Shrinking. Old Garments 
made to look like new. 

Try Us Just Once 

Have Your Clothing Cleaned 
Ready for Holidays 

Goods Called For and Delivered 
to any Part of City 

DURflND & M0FFITT, Props. 

TEL. MAIN 551 



Press of fieo. Rice & Sons (Inc..) 311 313 New High Street 



Western Graphic 



ILLUSTRATJErD \^CErKLT JOURNAL 



Volume VI. 
Number I. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, January 14, 1899. 



Edition de l.uxe 
lo Cents a Copy 



fa 



VS^ VS 7 '<S7 -^7 -^7 -^7 '^7 -tZ7 -^7 §M 

PASADENA EDITION 



k 



k 



fa 

A^ 




% 



^1 
i 

w 

# 
w 
w 



A HOME IN A ClTY OH HOMES— RESIDENCE OF H. M. HAMILTON 



f 

i 
i 

i 



• ^ "^■'^ ^5." ^ ^ ^ ^? ^5/ ^ 



fa 
A^ 



"The Crown of the Valley" 



^ ^CV *S *S ^ 



Western Graphic 




Most 
Novel 
Present 
Money 
Can Buy 

Reproduces music of 
Sousas' and Gilmore's 
Bands, Famous Songs 
and your own voice 



Call and Hear it 427 South Broadway 




Cbe 
American 

engraving 

Co mpany 

MADE MY PICTURE; 
DON'T YOU WANT 
THEM TO MAKE] 
YOURS?" 

"They make fine 
halftones, line cuts, 
embossing plates, 
newspaper cuts — 
just anything you 
want engraved. See 
them at the Times 
Building, 
Los Angeles." 



California 
Limited... 



Santa Fe 
Route 



Tlie Fastest Regular Train Ever Run Across tne Continent 



Arrives St i 'lis - 
Arrives Fort \\ 



HAVE YOU NOTICED THE SCHEDULE ? 

Leaves I.os Angeles 1.20 p.m. Hon. Wed. Sat. 
Arrives Denver - - 5.00 p.m. Wed. Fri. Mon. 
Arrives Kansas City - 9.10 p.m. Wed Frl. Mon. Arrives St Paul - 
Arrives Chicago - - 9.52 a.m. Thurs. Sat. Tues. Arrives New York 

Arrives Boston - 

The California Limited is made up of the highest elnss of equipment, is lighted by electricity 
Hnd carries composite and observation cars with every accommodation for ladies and gentlemen. 
The Dining Car gives unequaled service. 

This splendid tiain is for first-class travel only, but there is no extra charge beyond the regu 
lar ticket and sleeping car rate an r" is in addition to the regular Daily U verlknd Kzpre.a 
which cairies both Pullman Palace and tourist cars through to Chicago. 



CONNECTING TRAINS 
Arrives Omaha - - 6.( 0 a.m. Thur. Sat. Tues. 

7.00 a.m. Thur. Sat. Tues. 
h - 8.00 a.m. Thur. Sat. Tues. 
■ - T 00 p.m. Thur. Sat. Tues. 
1.80 p.m. Fri. Sun. Wed. 
8.00 p.m. Fri. Sun. Wed. 



HOTEL RflMONfl 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Most Centrally Located. First-class lit Modern Rate! 

Cor. Spring; and Third Streets 

F. B. MALLORY, Prop. 



our Wines Are unexcelled I 

They are selected from the finest Sonoma Valley and Southern California V 

V tntages. w 

Our prices make them within the reach of every purse. A trial will X 
convince von, *K 



This style Graphophone 
Talking Machine 

Si 2.00 — 



H. K. GREGORY. Asst Gen'l Pa'seugcr Agt 
S. C. and S. Fe. P. roads, Ias Angeles. 



JNO. J. BYRNE, Gen'l Passenger Agt. 

S. C and S. Fe P. roads, Los Angeles 



If 




^Los Angeles 
4 Pipe Organ Co. 

•>' Bolide s of 

* Church 
4 ..Concert.. 

•>' And 

4 Parlor Pipe Organs 

Factory: 
8th and San Pedro Sis. 
Los Angeles Tel. Oreen 1633 



( has. It. Conrad 
Henry Wilhelin 

Pneumatic Electro Pneumatic 
Action and Pueumatic Couplers 
our Specialty. Organs 
rebuilt by the latest sys- 
tems. Special specifica- 
tions furnished on short 
notice. Organs taken care of 
by yearly contract. Piano 
and Organ tuning and 
repairing 




EASTERN STAR LAUNDRY 

We do Fine Work and do not wear out the 21, q« n riOT CiL pTnrrT 
clothes All we ask is a trial T?" 01/ tflO I 0 III 0 I Htt I 

G. G. CEZAR, Proprietor 



Old Sonoma Claret 35 c gal 

Old Sonoma Zinfandel, very fine 41c B 'al 

5-year-old Port 50c gal 

5 '' Sberry, Angelica & Muscat, 65c gal 

All other goods in proportion 

We carry a full line of FINE LIQUEURS for Holiday Trade. 

Eastern shipments a specialty. 



Wines in bottles, the 50c kind. 

per bottle, 25c 

Good Whisky in bulk $190 gal 

Qnart Bottle of Fine Whisky 76o 



No bar In con- 
nection 

397-399 S. Los Angeles St. Free Delivery 1 



JOSEPH MA1ER 

President and Treas 

Home 
Industry 



MAIER & 
Z0BELELN 



444 ALIS0 STREET 



GEORGE ZOBELEIN 

Vice-Pres. and 8ec'y 

Keep Money 
at Home 




TEL. 91 



Incorporated 
•f 

LOS ANGELES, CAL 



for fall and Cduiter 

~» ONE OF KELLflM'S 

*° U , $15.00 B "" si 
JNeecL, 



Suits ^ >g 

362 S. Broadway 



Corner 4th Street 




LOS ANGELES 

Assay OTTiGG and Mining Change 

C C. DEAN, MANAGER 

Assaying a Specialty Low Rates and Accuracy 
MINES EXAMINED AND SAMPLED 



14i> NORTH MAIN St. 

Roomfl 5 and <» 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



Cos Angeles terminal Ry. 




THE 

TOURISTS' 
FAVORITE 
ROUTE . . 



I Mount Lowe 
' Santa Catalina Island 
I Long Beach 
San Pedro »■ »> .*•••.#> 



The Only Line passing through Long 
Beach with a picturesque six-mile ride 
along the Sea Shore going to Santa Cata- 
lina. Positively first-choice of Steamer ac- 
commodations. No delays. No transfers. 

To Mount Lowe Trains pass through beautiful Pas- 
adena and the San Gabriel Valley. No change 
of cars an advantage not secured on other lines. 

Telephone M. 960 

Excursion Tickets on Sale Every Day 

CITY TICKET OFFICE, 214 SO. SPRING ST. 

S. I?. HYNKS, <;en. Agt. T. C. PECK, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dap* 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VI. 
Number 2. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, January 14, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
10 Cents a Copy 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

ben. c. Truman :-: :-: :-: editor 




It is never quite safe nor proper to be 
dithyrambic in treating of new political suc- 
cessions, but since records and customs and 
traditions and precedents have been annihil- 
ated by the national Republican administra- 
tion, and we have a man like Gage for gover- 
nor instead of a person like Budd, it may be 
permissible for the " I told you so crowd " to 
become just a little cynical and even for all 
others whose diagnostic instinct has led them 
correctly. The year 1898 has been a great 
year and it has ended in a corona of glow 
and glory. Politically, colonially, martially 
and financially the year 1898 saw Uncle Sam 
"get there" with both feet — and its refulgence 
is but a promise of the brilliant luminosity 
which will be a memory of 1899. Some how 
or other, we started in pretty well in 1898. 
There had been a general conviction that the 
nation was entering upon an era of unprece- 
dented prosperity. Besides the facts of our 
phenomenal exports, the record-breaking earn- 
ings of railroads and other gigantic concerns 
and the plethora of cheap money is the hope 
of an ommipotent country. 

It will be remembered that early in the 
year Cuba aroused the country's conscience; 
the commencement of the war boomed the 
patriotic impulse existing quietly in every- 
one's heart, and the result has aroused the 
imagination of all truj broad guaged Ameri- 
cans which may be transformed into a colos- 
sal impulsive force. There are decaying 
nations and growing nations — and foremost 
among the latter is the United States. A race 
in the present epoch improves swiftly and in 
a few years we shall have a population of 
100,000,000 peopie. We've got Porto Rico, 
which we shall see the use of in years to come 
for a coaling and naval station; Cuba will 
come into our possession in a proper way in 
due time; Hawaii, which would be bad for 
Uncle Sam in the possession of any other 
nation, came to us on a silver platter, and 
we've got the Philippine Islands, which give 
us a parlor-door entrance to China — the El 
Dorado of the twentieth century. 

The signs are peceptible to outsiders as 
well as to the discerning insiders. English- 
men as well as Americans see them, and as 
powerful a British publication as the Satur- 
day Review, that was everything but favor- 
able to America up to the close of the Spanish 
war, acknowledges the brilliant possibilities 
indicated. " The great change in the destinies 
of the United States," says the Cautious 
Aunt, "is in a way the initial cause of the im- 
provement (in the market) and it is probable 
that next year will see on the other side of 



the Atlantic one of the most notable advances 
in commerce and manufactures which even 
the go-ahead Americans have ever engineered. 
But in England, also, the omens are favor- 
able. Recent events appear to have awakened 
Englishmen to a sense of their real impor- 
tance in the world and have certainly given 
them a gratifying sense of their power. The 
wave of imperialistic feeling which has passed 
over all classes is neither fictitious nor in any 
way mere jingoism but is likely to translate 
itself in customary English fashion into a 
very practical determination to continue the 
work of colonial expansion upon which it is 
now realized by everyone the future of 
Anglo-Saxondom depends. The little Englan- 
der is dead, and imperialism translated into 
economic terms means the application of Brit- 
ish capital to the fullest possible development 
of the immense territories we possess through- 
out the world." 

Which means that if "imperialism" is 
having that effect in England one may judge 
what that misnamed energy will do for the 
electrically charged country over which trium- 
phantly floats the United States flag! 

The inauguration ball came off on Mon- 
day evening last at Sacramento with John 
Barleycorn ruled out. We do not know of 
any occurrence of the week that has elicited 
such general approbation, and we are not ad- 
vised of any the less animation or delight in 
consequence; while, of course, there was an 
absence of that ungenteel deportment and 
ribald jest that seems to prevail when the de- 
votees of public balls put that enemy in their 
mouths that seems to have no extreme trouble 
in stealing away that modicum of gray mat- 
ter they are credited with possessing. There 
is one place that John Barleycorn should 
have no right to appear and that is at a great 
public-invitation ball,for there are always men 
and women who attend such places who in- 
dulge too freely in that beverage which not 
only cheers but puts on heads and renders the 
"jagites" uncomfortable, disagreeable and dis- 
gusting. 

When a poet sings of himself he is in- 
tensely interesting; when he gives the pub- 
lic a rhythmical invoice of his head gear, he 
becomes fascinating. Stephen Crane has lain 
bare the innermost recesses of his intellectual 
machinery in a poem, from which we ruth- 
lsssly pluck this bit: 

"Rumbling, buzzing, turning, whirling wheels, 
Dizzy wheels ! 
Wheels 1 " 

Thus equipped, Mr. Crane's ability to 
transfix the world by a motion of his pen is 
explained. It is, perhaps, safe to say that all 
men have wheels, but they, or most of them, 
anyway, have them under more or less con- 
trol. It is doubtful, however, that many 
have wheels that perform as described by the 
ubiquitous Stephen. We have read of men 
whose wheels rumbled and turned, but there 
are no other records of their buzzing and 
whirling until they are dizzy. From his in- 
voice we presume Mr. Crane's stock is full. 
After scheduling the several kinds of whee 



he adds some more wheels, as if to make sure 
that the entire contents of his wheel house is 
comprehended. In all the world's poetry 
there is but one stanza which maybe com- 
paied with Mr. Crane's, and this was- written 
by an inmate of the city jail and is as follows: 
" Fantastic, alluring, inspiring, delicious dope, 
Dreamy dope ! 
Dope ! " 



The press of the country, even including 
New England, favors by a substantial major- 
ity the annexation of the Philippines as well 
as Porto Rico, Hawaii and the Ladrones. Had 
the views of a majority of the grave and rev- 
erend Senators from New England on the 
Louisiana purchase been triumphant, Senator 
Vest of Missouri would never have had the 
opportunity of opposing the annexation of 
the Philipines. The same thing may be said of 
all those Senators west of the Mississippi riv- 
er — they would never have been in the Senate. 
As eminent a Senator as Webster opposed 
the admission of California into the Union 
and stated as his reason that California was 
sterile and non-productive. Senator Hager 
said in the Senate twenty years ago that there 
was not enough fertile land in all Arizona to 
feed a small band of sheep or a hundred cattle. 
A majority of New England Senators opposed 
the acquisition of Alaska, which has paid for 
itself a dozen times, and will some day furn- 
ish lumber for all the Pacific states. The 
United States is fast coming to be the largest, 
grandest and most populous civilized nation 
on the globe, and it is absolutely necessary on 
this account that it should at least hold on to 
all that it has fought, bled and died for. 

The events of the week of great interest to 
Californians are in the order named : — The 
rain, which is worth many millions of dollars 
to Southern California alone, and ensures 
good crops of barley, hay and beets, the re- 
plenishing of the mountain streams and reser- 
voirs, and other blessings innumerable ; the 
Senatorial contest at Sacramento, which is the 
most exciting ever known in this State ; the 
unanimous report of the Senate Committee on 
Foreign Relations in favor of the treaty of 
peace; the Kid McCoj -Sharkey fight, which 
took place in New York Tuesday night before 
8,000 people, the Kid being put to sleep in the 
tenth round; the sailing of the Oregon and 
Iris from Callao to Honolulu, and the Iowa 
and attending ships for San Francisco ; the 
knocking out of John Barleycorn at the Gov- 
ernor's ball. Besides these events, to Los 
Angeles people were others : The election of 
J. S. Slauson President of the Chamber of 
Commerce ; the re-election of Glass for Chief 
of Police and Walter Moore for Fire Chief; the 
manly position of Mayor Eaton against saloon 
back doors and side doors and slot machines; 
and the progress of preparations for the San 
Pedro Harbor celebration. And there are 
others. 



Kertshoe, kertshoe, kertshoel 
In maddening cadenza, 

O hear 'em sneeze! 

Each fellow he's 
Laid up with influenza. 



4 



Western Graphic 




In the Gay Life 

THE Monday Musical Club was entertained 
this week by Mrs. Catherine Kimball 
Forest and Miss Carrie Conger at the res- 
idence of the former on West Twenty-third 
street. The rooms were prettily done with 
greens,roses and poinsettias and refreshments 
followed the program given by the members 
and guests. Mrs. Ella Bryson Winters of 
Denver, Miss Pattee Woodard of Chicago, 
Miss Anna Virginia Metcalf and Mrs. Forest 
gave vocal numbers, Miss Lila Dalrymple and 
Miss Winifred Ballard added violin solos and 
Miss Lucia Forest played delightfully on the 
harp. 

Monday was Berkeley day in Los Angeles 
—the " Ha! ha! ha! California! U.C.Berkeley! 
Zip, Boom, Ah ! " of theCollege yell resound- 
ing in High School, tally-ho, street, threatre 
and hall trom early morning until well beyond 
the Cinderella hour. The boys were surely 
given un grand bien- venu by the young folks 
who attended the concert almost en masse and 
later tendered them a dance at Kramer's Hall. 

The Tuesday Evening Cotillion Club met 
as usual this week at Kramer's Hall in spite 
of inclement weather. About forty young 
people were present, the decorations were 
tastefully placed and Arend's orchestra played 
the deux- temp until the owl car schedule was 
announced 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace P. Anderson of West 
Tenth street gave an elaborate dinner on Mon- 
day evening in celebration of their wedding 
anniversary, as well as that of Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Keller of Santa Monica and Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Cosby. Mr. and Mrs. Fred John- 
son were also present. Two hearts of red and 
white carnations occupied the center of the 
table while above Cupid, ensnared in a net- 
work of smilax and scarlet ribbon, revolved 
and pointed his darts at his legitimate pre} 7 . 
The place caids repeated the floral decorations 
and were painted with chimes of bells. 

Miss Freda Hellman was the honon'e at a 
charmingly-planned dinner given in San 
Francisco last Tuesday evening by her cousin, 
Miss Clara Hellman. 

Miss Eliza Bonsall entertained on Satur- 
day last, complimentary to Miss Ella Clark, 
who was to leave for Europe the following 
Thursday for a two years' musical course. 

Mrs. George Kerckhoff and Miss Elisabeth 
Kerckhoff, who sailed for Europe in Novem- 
ber, spent Christmas and the holidays with 
relatives in Papenburg, Province of Hanover, 
Germany. Later they will seek a more con- 
genial climate, and will winter in Italy and 
the South of France. 

The handsome residence of Mr. and Mrs. 
0. T. Johnson on Orange street was brilliantly 
illuminated and decked and welcomed many 
guests on Thursday evening, the event being 
the marriage of the only daughter of the 
house, Katharine, to Frederick Wilson Flint, 
Jr. To merely say that Mrs. Bancroft de- 
signed the decorations is sufficient assurance 
of their bridal effect and fitness, the long lines 
of tulle, ribbons and smilax and massing of 
white carnations and green foliage forming a 
setting of unusual loveliness. The bride was 
attended by her three cousins, Miss Estelle 
Johnson of Galesburg, 111., and the Misses 
Candace and Eva Johnson of Riverside and 
her tiny niece and nephew, Anita and Charles 
Johnson. Mr.Burton E. Green acted as best 
man and the ceremony was performed by the 
pastor of Immanuel church, Rev. H. N. 
Walker. The robe noce was of heavy ivory 
satin, en train, garnitured with bertha of 
rose point and white violets. A cluster of 
ong-stemmed roses and the filmy veil caught 
with a diamond sunburst completed a toilet 
worthy the beauty, grace and elegance of the 
wearer. The maids were gowned in white and 



carried pink carnations. Mr. and Mrs. Flint 
will be at home the first and third Fridays in 
March at 943 South Burlington avenue. 

H. Llewellin Wigmore, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Wigmore, is one of the fortunate class 
of seventy-two who will graduate at West 
Point in February instead of June of this 
year and immediately be assigned to places of 
rank in the Army. As far as possible the 
young officers will be given duty in the cav- 
alry. 

Mrs. G. E. Overton and Miss Overton 
passed a very pleasant Christmas at Guadal- 
axara, Mexico. Mrs. Overton feels much 
benefited by the trip and change of scene. 

Mrs. I. N. Van Nuys has held informal re- 
ceptions on the two past Fridays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Goodwin (nee Cor- 
nelia Hamilton of Santa Monica) were the 
guests of honor at a dinner of sixteen covers 
given by Mr. and Mrs. William P. Morgan in 
San Francisco on New Year's Eve. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin is visiting her son 
Andrew at Palm Springs. 

Mrs. Dr. Carl Kurtz, who has been seri- 
ously indisposed for a number of weeks, is 
now in a state of convalescence, and has gone 
to Santa Monica, where she will sojourn until 
February. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Stimson are at the 
Palace, San Franciscc. Abbot Kinney, Geo. 
Patton and Captain Lankershim are also in 
San Francisco. 

Miss Dominguez, sister of Mrs. J. F. Fran- 
cis, is confined to the house with an attack of 
the prevalent grip. 

The departure of F. Wilson Porter for 
Honolulu last week, in company with a gay 
party of friends, has taken from society an- 
other of our etourdi youths. Some have gone 
the matrimonial way, others the milky way, 
and now he the trackless way. He at least 
may be reclaimed, while others not even board 
bills and hansom cabs can reinstate. 

Mrs. Howard S. Waring, daughter of ex- 
Senator and Mrs. Cole, is spending the winter 
in Washington, D.C , at 2233 Q. street. 

Miss Lucy McDougal went to Sacramento 
last week to attend the inauguration ball. It 
goes without saying that again has Los An- 
geles usurped the highest place for grace and 
loveliness in the State. 



THE RURAL PRESS ASSOCIATION. 

THE Rural Press Association of Southern 
California, an organization of newspaper 
owners outside of this city, representing the 
largest circulation (over 300,000) and with the 
widest distributive list of readers, is certainly 
the greatest combination for advertisers who 
wish to reach the best class of customers in 
this section. The association is represented 
in this city by W. Baldwin Harding, one of 
our clear cut business men, a born organizer 
and an A 1 born newspaper man. Mr. Hard- 
ing, whose offices are in the Byrne Block, has 
established various branch offices on this 
coast and it goes without saying that all busi- 
ness put in his hands will be heard from. The 
president of the association is Mr. Jeffrey of 
the Pomotropic, Azusa; Gen. John Wasson of 
the Pomona Times is vice-president, and John 
Sharp, South Pasadenan, is secretary and 
treasurer. The association embraces all the 
strong papers, and their terms are much lower 
as combined than singly, thus giving the ad- 
vertiser a great advantage and saving him 
time as wt 11. 

Many of the photographs from which en- 
gravings in this edition are made are the work 
of the expert view photographer, C. C. Pierce, 
113 West Second street, Los Angeles. The 
battalion picture in the Americus Club group 
is worthy of especial notice for its sharpness 
and clearness of detail. 




The Crown of the Valley 

Pasadena, January 13th, 1899. 

DEAREST BETTY:— Saturday the Berk- 
ley boys were here and it was a treat, I 
assure you, to the Pasadena girls to see so 
many fine manly fellows at one glance — here, 
where men are as scarce as hen's teeth and 
almost as useless. 

John Daggett and E. O. Hull and some of 
the enterprising men just home from college 
rushed around trying to get up a dance while 
the boys were here but after raising our ex- 
pectations to the highest pitch the thing fell 
through, no one knows why, and we girls had 
to content ourselves with fetching glances 
from the audience, for of course we all went 
to the Glee Club concert which was given at 
the Opera House Saturday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Scoville and Dr. and 
Mrs. F. S. Up de Graff had box parties in the 
right proscenium boxes,including Miss Libby, 
the Misses Dodworth, Miss Helen Daggett, 
Messrs. C. H. Hastings, B. O. Bruce and W. 
R. Staats. Mrs. F. W. Brown chaperoned 
another party in the left pro=cenium box, 
made up of Dr. and Mrs. J. Grant Lyman, 
Miss Brown, Miss Daggett, Mr. Huetson and 
John Daggett. The girls all looked stunning 
in their evening gowns and the box parties 
added greatly to the brilliancy of the occa- 
sion. 

The leading social event of this week was 
the reception given Wednesday from three to 
five by Mrs. Simson G. Reed at her home on 
Orange Grove avenue. She was assisted in re- 
ceiving her guests by Mrs. Martin Winch and 
the drawing rooms were crowded during the 
reception hours. The floral decorations were 
unusually lovely and orchestral music added 
to the pleasure of the afternoon. 

Next week will be full of gayety. 

Mrs. George W. Stimson has issued invita- 
tions for a reception from three to five 
Wednesday afternoon and Mrs. H. Clay Dur- 
and has sent out invitations for a breakfast at 
12:30 to be followed by cards at 2 o'clock. The 
event of the week, however, will be the grand 
opening reception and ball to be held Monday 
evening at Hotel Green. 

Of course you have received your invita- 
tion, as all the swagger set in Los Angeles has 
been invited. The general reception is to be 
from seven until nine, dancing from nine to 
twelve. The whole house will be thrown open 
and there will be three orchestras furnishing 
music. Refreshments will be served in both 
buildings and there will be dancing in the 
ball room in the west building and also in 
the dancing hall in the east building. Jes- 
sica says that will be a grand scheme for sep- 
arating the sheep from the goats, but the in- 
vitation list for the dancing has been care- 
fully arranged so no goats have been invited 
to participate. 

Invitations are out for the wedding of Miss 
Virginia Preston Rowland and C. Warring 
Leffingwell, which will be solemnized in All 
Saints' church, January 25, at 8 o'clock in the 
evening. We girls have been in a state of 
excitement over the wedding for months, for 
it was to have been the loveliest affair in every 
detail. A church wedding, six bridesmaids, a 
big reception afterwards, which was also to be 
a sort of coming out party for Miss Edith 
Rowland, Miss Rowland's younger sister who 
has just returned from school in the East. 
But it only shows how little one can count on 
things in this world, for the reception has 
been given up on account of the death of a 
relation of the prospective bride's mother, 
and now by reason of another sad death two 
of the bridesmaids will be unable to attend 
the bride. The bridesmaids were to have 
been Misses Libby, Cloud, Armstrong, Leffing- 
well and the Misses Hubbard, and their gowns 
which are just ready are the loveliest things 
imaginable. Phyllis. 



mm mm ■ H 





>JL~ JL^J> '-A>^ ;: ou^T 
ill 4 ■* * 




Group Photos by Pierce 
Will E. Chapin, Designer 



The Americus Club 

With WESTERN GRAPHIC, January 14, 1899. 



Portraits by CranJall. Pasadena 
and Schumacher, Los Angeles 



Western Graphic 



5 




The T)ovse Show 

February 1,2,3,4, '899 

AS THE time for the Horse Show ap- 
proaches a few pertinent remarks as to 
what constitutes a horse show proper may not 
be amiss. With the exception of those who 
have been fortunate enough to witness horse 
shows in some of the Eastern cities and else- 
where there are but few of our own people 
who have a correct conception of the benefits 
accruing to a city through the holding of an 
annual horse show. In the first place the 
stimulus to the horse breeding interests is 
marked. The carriage and harness industries, 
together with other allied trades, are equally 
stimulated, for the reason that the average 
spectator at the Horse Show will be encour- 
aged by the spirit of competition to obtain a 
better class of horses and equipages for his 
own stables so that at the following annual 
Horse Show he may be in a better position to 
enter his animals for competition for the cov- 
eted " blue ribbon." 

As a social function, furthermore, a horse 
show offers an opportunity that cannot be 
equaled by any other private or public recep- 
tion, and the coming exhibition is society's all 
absorbing topic. The private boxes surround- 
ing the arena offer opportunity for the receiv- 
ing and exchanging of calls, while the visitors 
and recipients are entertained erstwhile by 
the viewing of prancing thoroughbreds and 
enchanting music. 

In the enclosure of the Horse Show there 
will be provided a restaurant where refresh- 
ments will be served, and where supper par- 
ties will be held by the box occupants. No 
prettier sight can be imagined than the arena 



of a horse show filled with sleek and carefully 
groomed horses of high degree all on exhibi- 
tion against a background of daintily gowned 
and lovely women who occupy the boxes sur- 
rounding the arena. Vanity must always be 
apparent at the Horse Show, and while this 
fact is indisputable it by no means consti- 
tutes in itself a horse show proper, for the 
great benelits accruing to the city in which it 
is held are to the breeding interests of horses 
as well as the advertising which the city nat- 
urally receives through the holding of such 
annual exhibitions, at the same time society 
turning out in full force lends additional zest 
to the ensemble." 

Society and the horse have always been 
more or less akin, for, as Kipling aptly re- 
marked, 

"Greater than all things these things are, 
Women and horses and power and war." 
The Horse Show Association of Southern 
California has been exceptionally fortunate in 
securing for their first annual exhibition, 
which is to be held in this city the first four 
days of February, 1899, co-operation from all 
parts of the State, and from all indications 
the first exhibition will prove a gratifying 
success. 

FROM FAIR REDONDO. 

OLD and alone — friendless ! The last dy- 
ing ember of hope almost faded I There 
was nothing now to bind him to life — no ties 
to strengthen his faltering spirit against the 
cruel buffeting of the world. Such were the 
sad conditions that drove the unfortunate 
man on — on toward death. He had been a 
week in Los Angeles; had tried diligently to 
get work; ill luck pursued him everywhere. 
At last goaded by desperate hunger, and that 
awful abandon that few ever know, he betook 
himself to Redondo, determined to blot out 
his wretched life in the unknowable depths of 
oblivion. 

Alone he crept down to the ocean's edge. 
No one observed him. It was night — dark- 
ness everywhere. He was quite alone. Steathl- 
ily he made bis way to the pier. He started 



at every sound like a guilty wretch afraid — of 
what he did not know — but he seemed like a 
thief about to take that which was not his to 
take. He looked down at the black water. 
How cold and cruel it was 1 He hesitated on 
the edge of the wharf. Now he crounched 
back as though to jump. All his past life 
swept before his memory's vision in a moment. 
It is all dark — forbidding. Shall he continue 
thus — face again the fateful odds that have 
been always against him ? Again he peered 
over the wharf's end down into the mocking 
waters. Farewell to life— a lunge — mid air — 
he holds his breath — bang — 

Santo Cristo 1 Whata the matta here? 
Jumpa the boata — spoila the bait, (low 
music). 

OTHERWISE. 

Mrs. Wm. Bartling entertained the chafing 
dish club very delightfully at the hotel Tues- 
day evening. While the stormed raged out- 
side, a blazing fire crackled in the large open 
grate around which the guests gathered and 
spun merry yarns and popped corn. A delicious 
welsh rarebit was served from the chafing 
dishes. Those who enjoyed the party were: 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. A. Peterson, Mr. and Airs. 
Geo. A. Simmonds, Mr. and Mrs. H. R. War- 
ner, Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Borden, Mmes. 
Tracy, Wm. Bartling, Noddin, Burnett, Mc- 
Lain, Messrs. H. B. Ainsworth, W. J. Young, 
and Waldo R. Norris. 

J. A. Sepulveda of Los Angeles has come 
to the Hotel Redondo for an extended sojourn. 

Mrs. Wm. Pridham entertained a number 
of friends at afternoon tea in her apartments 
at the Hotel Monday. 

Since the rainstorm the sea has been run- 
ning very high. It would be difficult to ima- 
gine a more beautiful sight than the great 
swells rolling in against a strong land breeze 
that blows back the spray in a long streamer 
of white. 

Among the visitors at the Hotel Redondo 
this week was the following party of promin- 
ent eastern tourists: Mr. and Mrs. A. Batchel- 
der, Mrs. D. J. Harris, Mrs. M. L. Pette, Mrs. 
Geo B. Harris of Chicago, Mrs. Enoch Chase, 
Mrs. S. Burnell, Mrs. S. F. Watson, Mrs. C.V. 
Lansing of New York, and Mrs B. F. Hobart 
of St. Louis. 




GROCERY HOUSE OF J. T. MES8ER * 80NS 



Western Graphic 



X PASADENA X 

jjv THE CROWN OF THE VALLEY j|t 



WRITING of Pasadena is like reveling in 
descriptions of pretty women, pretty 
sunsets and other ineffably beautiful objects 
that charm and electrify the sense. As has 
once before been observed in this paper, John 
\V. Mackey once said that he had been all 
over the world a number of times and that 
Pasadena was the prettiest place he had ever 
seen. Other cultivated travelers competent to 
speak have expressed the same opinion. These 
estimates of the attraction of the place were 
not a whit overdrawn. Every effort of the 
imagination is needed to even faintly furnish 
an idea of the charms of our neighbor adjoin- 
ing the foothills. Its growth since the days, 
only twenty-five years ago, when the lands on 
which it stands sold for the astonishingly low 
sum, rough and smooth, of eight dollars and 




Aiuer. 



a half an acre, has been simply miraculous. 
Some of that eight dollars and a half an acre 
land has since sold at the rate of $150,000 an 
acre, or possibly more. But the miracle 
working has been in the line of a variegated 
and indescribable beauty, such as inspired the 
tributes of the Bonanza King and others, and 
which have been echoed by many others who 
have visited all sections of the globe. 

The salubrity and heaithfulness of Pasa- 
dena's climate, added to its scenic beauty, 
make it an ideal place of residence. This fact 
has been so generally recognized that the 
yearly inflow of home-seekers ha3 often created 
a greater demand for houses than could be 
supplied. No place in California, in propor- 
tion to size, has as many handsome houses as 
may be found there. 

The city was founded by an intelligent 
class of people, and during the whole period 
of its history it has continued to draw unto 
itself residents of like character, until now it is 
distinguished as a city wherein the standard 
of intellectuality, refinement, morality, thrift 



enterprise and similar qualities is exception- 
ally high. The evidence of these traits is to be 
seen in many ways in the city — in the num- 
ber and elegance of its churches and the mem- 
bership of their congregations; in the costliness 
of its school buildings and the records of their 
educational attainments ; in the meager re- 
ports of its criminal courts; in the absence of 
saloons and all other places of vice ; in the 
appearance of the public library building, 
opera house and business blocks; in the whole 
tenor and tone of public and private life. 

Nearly every home has its orchard of as- 
sorted fruits, and no resident of Pasadena 
need be without a variety at all times of the 
year. Oranges ripen in January and continue 
to be good if left on the trees from that time 
throughout the summer. They are most 



largely picked for shipping during January 
and February. Apricots ripen in July, and 
peaches and prunes soon follow. 

The cultivation of flowers forms a fitting 
accompaniment for the growing of fruits, and 
about every home may be seen a wealth of 
floral display not to be found in other lati- 
tudes. All the varieties which in the east are 
grown only in hothouBesat Pasadena flourish 
out of doors, attaining great size and luxur- 
iousness. 

Of other crops grown in great abundance 
in and about Pasadena and all the way be- 
tween the Arroya Seco and the foothills, there 
is annually raised a plentiful supply of bar- 
ley, wheat, corn, alfalfa, and all the vegeta- 
bles that are found in the temperate zone. 
Barley and wheat often attain maturity in 
January, and six to eight crops of alfalfa, 
running from half a ton to one and one-half 
tons per acre, are cut during the season. The 
many varieties of vegetables succeed each 
other throughout the year, and the tables of 
both the poor and the rich ar e never withou 



a full variety — and they are both plentiful 
and cheap. 

Pasadena has ample railroad facilities; 
hotels that are among the finest on the coast, 
large and costly business buildings, a water 
system that distributes to all parts of the city 
pure mountain water, an efficient sewer sys- 
tem, gas and electric plants for public light- 
ing, a well equipped fire department and a 
complete telephone system, etc. 

Three steam railroads (the Santa Fe, the 
Southern Pacific and the Terminal) and the 
Los Angeles and Pacific electric road connect 
the city with Los Angeles and other points, 
These competing lines afford the lowest rates 
for freight and passengers. 

In addition to these the Mount Lowe elec- 
tric railway, which is a line of travel entirely 
unique in construction and operation, extends 
from Pasadena to the summit of Echo Moun- 
tain, a spur in the Sierra Madre range 3219 
feet above the sea, and thence to Alpine Tav- 
ern, amidst the pines and oaks, 4250 feet above 
the sea. The remarkable feature about the 




road now in operation to Echo Mountain is 
that a section of it has the steepest grade of 
any railroad in the world. An elegant hotel 
and the Lowe Astronomical Observatory, the 
latter presided over by the celebrated Dr. 
Swift, are located upon the summit of Echo 
Mountain. 

The opportunities for outdoor enjoyment 
in this climate are not only improved by trips 
to the seaside and mountains, by picnics in 
the canyons and drives over many routes of 
great scenic beauty, but by a yearly carnival 
of flowers that for the past nine years has 
made the first day of January a holiday of 
distinctive importance in Pasadena. This an- 
nual fete has received the title of "Tourna- 
ment of Roses." It is a parade of six-horse 
and four-horse floats and coaches, pony 
equipages, single and double carriages, eques- 
trians and bicycles, beautifully and elabo- 
rately decorated with tens of thousands of 
flowers, many of them with designs represent- 
ing some historical period or event. Prizes 

(Continued on page 10) 




8 



Western Graphic 



pasadena's Business 
Interests 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

The First National Bank of Pasadena is 
one of the noted solid institutionsof the south- 
west, and during the thirteen years since its 
incorporation that solidity has never been in 
question. By courtesey of the cashier, Mr. E. 
H. May, the following extracts from his an- 
nual report to the directors appear: 

Capital $1,000,000 

Dividends for 1898 - - - $135,000 
Surplus and undivided profits - $60,000 



SHE UNDERSTANDS FULLY WHAT FAIR WOMEN 
WANT. 

Mrs. S. L Bettis has a very pleasant ladies' 
hair-dressing parlor at 19 North Raymond 
avenue. Mrs. Bettis is a thoroughly skilled 
hair dresser and chiropodist, understands 
manicuring in its highest order and the best 
treatment of the scalp and skin. Her place 
is cosy and inviting and she enjoys a good 
patronage. 

A NOTED REAL ESTATE FIRM. 

Good, reliable real estate firms are the 
foundation work of a good city. William R. 
Staats & Co., investment bankers and brokers 
of Raymond avenue and Green street, Pasa- 
dena, is just such a firm, and parties seeking 
information on Pasadena property will do 
well to see this house. 




PASADENA HIGH SCHOOL TALLY-HO— TOT RN AM ENT OF ROSES, 1HU9. 



Pierce Photo 



Aggregate resources on Dec. 31,1898 - $860,000 
The bank carried during 1898, 2,274 open 
accounts. 

The average deposits for 1898 were - $664,000 
Average loans .... $425,000 
Drafts drawn on correspondents for 

1898 $5,045,800 

Amount of drafts and checks cashed 

on other banks during 1898 - $7,122,400 
Total volume of business for 1898 - $31,616,300 

The bank is the oldest in Pasadena, pays 
ten percent dividends annually, and its stock 
stands at 175. It is on the northwest corner 
of Fair Oaks avenue and Colorado street in 
one of the finest blocks of the business sec- 
tion. 



AN OLD PLUMBING ESTABLISHMENT. 

Bonham & Curry have a fine store on West 
Colorado street fully stocked with the best 
obtainable in the plumbers, gas and steam fit- 
ters' line. This firm has just finished the 
work at Hotel Green, which is one of the 
finest pieces of plumbing and steam fitting 
work ever done on the Pacific coast. 



THE HOTEL NICHOLAS. 

Hotel Nicholas is one of the pleasant room- 
ing places of Pasadena on Mission street just 
east of North Fair Oaks avenue. Miss Iren 
Beasley makes her house homelike and com- 
fortable for all its guests. 



A BRIGHT JEWEL ON THE CROWN OF THE VALLEY. 

A good jewelry house is a bright spot in 
any community, and that of the California 
Jewelry Co., Joseph Strain, manager, at 14 
Colorado street, is an especially bright spot. 
Mr. Strain and his assistants are practical 
jewelers, both manufacturing 
and repairing, and they carrj' 
a most carefully selected and 
Al stock. Their optical de- 
partment is complete and in 
skillful hands and the house 
commands the best custom of 
Pasadena. 



A MODEL GROCERY, FRITT AND DELICACY STORE 

The grocery house of J. T. Messer & Sons 
at 26 South Raymond avenue is a model 
Southern California house of its line and a 
great credit to Pasadena's business center. 
Here one finds everything of the staple and 
fancy grocery order, table delicacies and fresh 
fruits in every season. The evident freshness 
and largeness of the stock in sight proves that 
Mr. Messer and his sons enjoy a prosperous 
patronage. 

LEADING UNDERTAKERS. 

Messrs. Reynolds & Van Nuys, 63 North 
Fair Oaks avenue, conduct the oldest funeral 
directing and embalming house of Pasadena 
and are the only firm on the Pacific coast 
owning and operating a perfectly appointed 
crematory. Their telephone number iB 52, and 
prompt attendance to every detail of business 
has won for them the respect and confidence 
of the very best patronage. 

A WELL KNOWN PLUMBING FIRM. 

Munger & Munger are the proprietors of a 
very well equipped and stocked plumbing, 
tinning and heating furnishing house on 
South Fair Oaks avenue, Pasadena. Ifc.They 
pay especial attention to furnace, galvanized 
iron and gas stove work and enjoy a good 
patronage. 

WATER IS KING. 

T. Earley, real estate, mortgage and bond 
broker, and agent of the Temascal bonds, 30 
East Colorado street, is one of the pleasante6t 
men to do business with in fair Pasadena. 
These bonds are guaranteed by a company 
that is worth $2,000,000, and pay 6 per cent, 
net interest and afford investors the best op- 
portunity now open in Southern California. 
Interest is payable at Los Angeles semi-an- 
nually, bonds run nine years, proceedings 
guaranteed legally correct. 

BEAR THIS FACT IN MIND. 

The Page Wall-paper Co., A, J. Page mana- 
ger at 172 East Colorado street, is a well 
stocked house in the hands of a practical dec- 
orator and paper hanger. This house handles 
a good line of liquid paints and does picture 
framing to order. 

ALL KINDS OF WARES THAT CAN'T BE BEAT. 

A. P. Janney of 25 East Union street has 
a large business house well stocked with every- 
thing in the hardware, wooden ware and gen- 
eral kitchen furnishing line. He has carried 
furniture but is closing that out for an exclu- 
sive hardware business. 

HE KEEPS NONE BIT THE FINEST GOODS. 

A. Garibaldi conducts the only wine deal- 
ing house in Pasadena and vicinity. His 
trade is principally wholesale and his stock 
mainly his own manufacture. He makes a 
speciality of fine medicinal wines. 

A NOTED DENTAL SPECIALIST. 

R. de G. Treen, D.D.S., is one of Pasa- 
dena's leading dental specialists. He is a 



PAINTS, OILS, PICTURE FRAMES AND GLASS. 

H. W. Wadsworth has a complete and very 
well equipped paint, oil, picture frame and 
glass house on East Colorado street. Mr. 
Wadsworth's business leads all in his line in 
Pasadena and his careful attention to its 
every detail has brought him an especially 
desirable patronage. 

SEE DAVE COYLE ABOUT IT. 

D. W. Coyle of the Pasadena Bill Posting 
Co. is one of those genial good fellows whom 
it does one's heart good to meet. If you want 
any posters put up see Dave about it. 



KEEP GOOD FUEL ON HAND FOR 
YOURSELF AND GOOD FOOD 
FOR YOUR HORSE. 

Pasadena has some fine 
hay, grain, feed and fuel 
houses, and among the best is 
that of F. S. Bangham, located 
at 135 East Colorado street, 
telephone 20. Mr. Bangham's 
business is prospering as is 
shown by his large stock of 
everything good in the line 
of hay,grain, coal and wood. 




FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF PASADENA 



Hill Photo 



Western Graphic 



9 





JAPANESE TEA GARDEN— Victor Marsh 



[Aiuct. Eng Co.— Pierce. Photo] 



INDIAN AND MEXICAN CURIOS— Pkiiky Gavin 



graduate of the Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery and late demonstrator of operative 
dentistry in the University of Denver. He 
makes a specialty of crown aDd bridge work. 
Rooms 4, 6 and 13 Fish Block, Colorado St. 

Howland's Gymnasium fills a long felt 
want in Pasadena. The institution occupies 
the entire building on the corner of Green 
street and Fair Oaks avenue and is provided 
with every facility for high class gymnasium 
work under a trained instructor. The bathing 
department is a special feature of the institu- 
tion. Here can be found the only complete 
set of baths in this district, comprising a hot 
room, a steam room for Turkish and Russian 
baths, a massage room, private dressing 
rooms, sun, lounging and reading rooms. 
This inststute is open daily from 8 a. m. to 10 
p. m. Ladies' hours, 1 to 4 p. m. 



FROM FLOOR TO CEILING. 

The Racket Store of Pasadena is that con- 
ducted by Mr. Seavey. The house is stocked 
from floor to ceiling, end to end, with every- 
thing in the racket store line, and prices are 
quoted which suit evervbody. The store is at 
111 E. Colorado St. 



Mr. Marsh's department of this great 
store is a veritable Japanese Emporium and 
tea garden, having a perfectly equipped inter- 
ior Japanese tea house where tea is served by 
native Japanese in costume. The store is 
stocked with everything purchasable in the 
Japanese art line, and is a beautiful picture 
and study of the varied manufactures of the 
little men of the nation. 

Perry Gavin's department is devoted ex- 
clusively to everything made by the Indian 
and Mexican. Here one sees the finest and 
most intricate of Mexican drawn work, carved 
work in leather and wax work so familiar to 
displays in this part of the southwest but so 
new and wonderful to the tourist. 

Of Indian work there is everything in bas- 
kets and plaques wrought by the Arizona In- 
dian tribes, especially those of the Moki tribe, 
blankets handsomely decorated, different sets 
of Indian head dress, feather work, moccasin 
bead work, etc., etc. This store is one of Pasa- 
dena's finest and, situated as it is near Hotel 
Green, is a popular resort for the many guests 
of that great caravansary. 



.THE JAPANESE-INDIAN -MEXICAN EMPORIUM. 

One of the finest curio and art stores on 
this continent is that conducted by Victor 
Marsh and Perry Gavin in the Morgan block, 
Nos. 52-54 Raymond avenue, Pasadena, sign 
of the Temple Lamp. 



THE popularity of the Americus Club 
and its extraordinary success in the per- 
formance of its intricate military evolutions 
is due more larg3ly to Maj. N. S. Banghara 
than to almost any other man. His long ex- 
perience in the National Guard has made 
him a drill master second to none in the state. 
Allied to this is the ability to win the loyalty 
and inspire the confidence of his officers and 
men and stimulate their enthusiasm to a de- 
gree that prompts them to- attend the numer- 
ous drills. The success of any organization 
like the Americus Club is due mainly to its 
commander and it is no small compliment to 
its popular leader that there has been no dis- 
cord in its ranks since its organization. Offi- 
cers and men are always willing to "follow 
the Major." 

One of the most distinguishing features of 
the club is its chaste uniform modeled on that' 
of the navy. It is made of white duck trimmed 
with gold and consists of military fatigue coat, 
full trousers, army cap and yellow leggings. 
None but those who have seen it when the 
club is on the street can realize the bright, 
fresh appearance that it presents when worn 
by two or three hundred men all marching 
with rhythmic step. The credit of its design 
belongs to one of the oflicers of the club, Will 
E. Chapin. The club is very proud of its uni- 
form and no member has ever bpen guilty of 
any act that would bring it into disrepute or 
reflect upon the dignity of the club. 

The credit for the beautiful picture of Pasa- 
dena in this issue is due to the artists, C. M. 
Stanley and J. E. Hare of The F. H. Maude 
Company, 120 .J S. Spring street this city. The 
point of view was from the Annex of Hotel 
Green, one of the most beautiful views in the 
pierce Photo crown of the valley. Our engraving is made 

building and interior of gymnasium of h. m. howland from a complete photo 6x24 inches. 





Pierce Flashlight 
Judge Day has declined to be considered a 
candidate for governor of Ohio. It is less 
than a year ago that people learned the iden- 
ity of Judge Day and the more information 
they have gained the greater has been their 
respect. There is a growing conviction that 
President McKinley knew Judge Day better 
than the country did. At least, it is significant 
tbat he is no longer referred to by anyone as 
" the little country lawyer of Canton." 




"MISERY," the Americus Club's Mascot. 



10 



Continued from fiag 6 



for the best decorated equipage stimulate a 
friendly rivalry and the day concludes with 
out-of-door music and sports. 

These New Year's fetes have always at- 
tracted spectators from neighboring towns 
and have never failed to be delightful mid- 
winter events, enjoyed in the bright sunshine 
of such days as may be found on the first of 
January only in Southern California. 

Throughout the winter season thereafter, 
tally-ho drives by large parties of residents 
and tourists, horse back parties, and moun- 
tain and seaside excursions are almost of 
daily occurrence. 

The first consideration of tourists as well 
as of persons in making a home is health. It 
always outweighs that of business. Fortun- 
ately for those contemplating a removal to 



Western Graphic 

Zbc Hmericus Club 

Nearly every pretentious city in the Union 
has its crack military or uniformed political 
organization in which are enrolled the thor- 
oughbreds of the place— not that all its mem- 
bers possess those strains of blood that de- 
note lineage "from away back," but that 
they are representatives from the leading arts 
and professions and other walks of life that 
thrust its best men forward as leaders and 
workers for showy and exemplary results. 
Conspicuous among the crack clubs in Cali- 
fornia, and eclipsing all others in the superior 
social and business standing of its members, 



also the list of honorary and associate mem- 
bers. These lists show the names of many 
distinguished Southern Californians — judges, 
lawyers, doctors, leaders of finance, and others 
who have deemed it an honor to associate 
themselves together for general good results; 
and while at its inception it was formed 
mainly for partisan benefit and effect, so ex- 
tensively has it participated in public dem- 
onstrations of all kinds that it today receives 
welcome and support from the prominent 
leaders of business in all parties. The follow- 
ing is a list of 

THE OFFICERS OF THE AMERICUS CLUB. 

President— Horace M. Dobbins; Vice-President. 
H. I. Stuart; Secretary, J. A. Stafford; Treasurer, E. 
J. Pyle. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
Horace M. Dobbins, chairman; J. A. Stafford. 




The Crown of the Valley-More Beautiful and More Bewitiin 




Pasadena, its chief merit is its healthfulness. 
Its location on the high mesa at the west end 
of the San Gabriel valley, at the foot of the 
Sierra Madra range of mountains, is ideal in 
point of beauty and health. The lofty moun- 
tains keep off the cold winds from the north, 
while it is open on the south to the cool and 
invigorating breezes from the ocean, which 
lose their superabundant moisture before 
reaching its elevation of about 900 feet, while 
passing over some eighteen miles of country 
between it and the ocean. To be sure the 
charm of the climate can never be fully des- 
cribed in words or statistical tables, but the 
volumes that have been written in its praise, 
and the thousands that annually resort thith- 
er for health and pleasure, furnish the best 
testimony in proof of its virtues. 



A woman says that immediately after mar- 
riage a man is different. Yes, and a year 
after he is apt to be indifferent. 



is the Americus Club of Pasadena, which is 
to Southern California what the " Reliance 
Cl a b»— the old guard of the g. o. p. of Cali- 
fornia — is to that section of the State north of 
the Tehachepi. 

In 1896 the enthusiastic young men— 
and many old men who never know they are 
old— of Pasadena concluded that it was pos- 
sible to have a marching club in the " Crown 
City of the Valley " that should bear its ban- 
ners before any and all comers in numbers, 
perfect drill maneuvers and striking uniform. 
So the Americus Club was organized, and ever 
since has figured in almost every civic and 
military display successfully gotten up south 
of the Coast range. 

The Club comprises one battalion made up 
of three companies. Its members are fully 
uniformed in coat, trousers, helmet and leg- 
gings, the body cloth white and the trimmings 
gold. 

The official roster of the Club follows, and 



secretary; EL I. Stuart. E. J. Pyle, N. S. Bangbam 
Jas. H. Campbell. Henry Ramel, Calvin Hartwell, W. 
B. Clapp, W. C. Smith, J. G. Rossiter, J. W. Wood, 
A. H. Palmer, P. A. Collins, Chas. W. Bell. 

BATTALION OFFICERS. 
Major, N. S.Bangham. Commissioned Staff— Ad- 
jutant, Horace M. Dobbins, rank of 1st lieut.; Surgeon, 
J. W. Wood, rank of 1st lieutenant : Quartermaster, 
Jno. McDonald; rank of 2nd lieutenant; Commissary, 
Edwin Stearns, rank of 2nd lieutenant; Ordnance 
Officer, Will E. Chapin, rank of 2nd lieutenant; 
Judge-Advocate, Jno. G. Rossiter, rank of 2nd lieu- 
tenant; Aide, Geo. A. Gibbs, rank of 2nd lieutenant; 
Acting Asst. Surgeon, W. H. Roberts, rank of 2nd 
lieutenant. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 
Sergeant-Major, A. L. Monahan; Quartermaster 
Sergeant, Herman Dyer; Hospital Steward, W. C. 
Smith; Commissary Sergeant, Geo. T. Downing; 
Color Sergeant, Calvin Hartwell; Color Sergeant, 
John M. York; Drum Major, Geo. H. Frost ; Color 
Corporal, N. S. Bangham ; Color Corporal, Harry 
M. Stone; Principal Musician, Chas. S. Weber. 
COMPANY OFFICERS-CO. A. 
Captain, Jas. H. Campbell; 1st Lieutenant, H. 



Western Graphic 



11 



H. Klamroth; 2nd Lieutenant. E. J. Py)e; 1st Sergt., 
H. I. Stuart; Sergeant, J. W. Allin; Sergeant, P. A. 
Collins; Sergeant, A. G. Buchanan; Sergeant. T. D. 
Allin; Corporal. W. C. Schneider; Corporal, H. R. 
Sutliff; Corporal, H. J. Hardwick ; Corporal, J. S. 
Glasscock; Corporal, W. J. Pierce ; Corporal, D. H. 
Permar ; Corporal, E. P. Ashley; Corporal, Albert 
Mercer; Guidon Corporal, A. L. Traphagen. 

COMPANY B. 

Captain, Charles W. Bell; 1st Lieutenant, W. J. 
Richardson; 2nd Lieutenant, James B. McNeil; 1st 
Sergeant, John C. Kinsman; Sergeant, Homer Blick; 
Sergeant, M. E. Wood; Sergeant, E. E. Flounders; 
Sergeant, Joseph La Spoda; Corporal, J. H. Cald- 
well; Corporal, I. L. Rice; Corporal, J. D. Cross- 
man; Corporal, H. W. Rhodes; Corporal, James Ed- 
mondson; Corporal, J. C. Spencer; Corporal, John 
R. Slater; Corporal, J. J. Blick. 

COMPANY C. 

Captain, Henry Ramel; 1st Lieutenant, W. B. 



California Volunteers, formerly the N. G. C, 
and being always deeply interested 'in mili- 
tary affairs has proven just the man to bring 
the Club up to proficiency in drill. To his 
untiring effort in this line is due much of the 
Club's success and the welcome which every- 
where greets it. 

President Horace M. Dobbins' popularity 
is wide and merited. His efficient work in 
his office has made the club a success by re- 
taining and adding to its membership and by 
inculcating into every man enthusiasm for 
success. His organization of the committee 
work also merits special mention. Mr. Dob- 
bins is also a member of Pasadena's board of 
City Trustees and a prominent leader of the 
Valley Hunt and Country Clubs, so popular 
in this section. 



dena, during the fall campaign. In 1898 
last fall, it marched at Pasadena six times, 
Los Angeles six times, Pomona. Santa Monica, 
San Pedro, Santa Barbara, San Bernardino 
and Redlands once each. 

At Santa Barbara 191 members in full 
uniform were in line, at Redlands 188 and at 
San Bernardino 168. On the Santa Barbara 
trip the Club marched three times in one day, 
stopping at Santa Paula and Ventura. The 
largest crowds of the campaign greeted them 
wherever they went and the enthusiasm was 
unbounded. 

Considering all these things it is no won- 
der that Pasadena is proud of the Americus 
Club, and Western Graphic feels happy to 




Clapp; 2nd Lieutenant, F. W Healy; Sergeant, E. 
O. Nay; Sergeant, W. A. Fuller; Sergeant, H. F. 
Cogswell; Sergeant, L. C. Brockway; Corporal, O. H. 
Hayes; Corporal, H. E. Cobb; Corporal, E. W. Nay; 
Corporal, A. Holloway; Corporal, C. S. Heiser; Cor- 
poral, Benjamin Vlier; Corporal, L. M. King, Cor- 
poral, A. P. Gaylord; Corporal, C. P. Gregory; Gui- 
don Corporal, F. M. Worrall. 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS. 
H. F. Ball, F. P. Boynton, F. C. Bolt, Wm. H. 
Conrad, A. R. Dodworth. P. M. Green, Ed Lockett, 
Leo Longley, A. K. McQuilling, A. R. Metcalfe, J. 
H. Merriam, Hon. H. H. Markham, Hon. Geo. D. 
Patton, M. L. Painter, Frank V. Rider, Wm. R. 
Staats, Hon. C. H. Simpson, John H. Strine, Wm. 
Stanton, Wm. G. Talcott, R. D. Wade, W. S. 
Wright, Wm. L. Woodward, Hon. W. M. York, H. E. 
Andrews. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 
Hon. Frank F. Davis, Hon. James McLachlan, 
ex-M. C; Hon. R. J. Waters, M. C. 

Major N. S. Bangham, major command- 
ing of the AmericuB Club, is one of Pasa- 
dena's most popular and energetic citizens. 
He is a" major, jr., of the Seventh Regiment 



J. A. Stafford, secretary of the Club, comes 
in for a share of well deserved praise at the 
hands of his fellows. He has worked hard 
and done much to make the organization a 
success. E. J. Pyle is enjoying a second term 
as treasurer, and has managed to keep that 
important part of the Club business in pros- 
perous shape. 

Space will not permit mention of other of- 
ficers, but it may be said that in no organiza- 
tion can better officers or harder working, 
more earnest members be found. Equality is 
the watchword, all are friends, they come 
from every walk of life, from work manual 
and mental, but in the Club they are one for 
brotherhood, one for success. 

The Club's record for service will be hard 
to beat, and is a» follows: Always present 
at Memorial exercises, at the annual Tourna- 
ment of Roses, Pasadena, and the Los Ange- 
les La Fiesta. In 1896 it appeared five times 
in Los Angeles, once each in Monrovia, Santa 
Monica and Riverside and six times in Pasa- 



com pliment the organization and to present 
photos of the companies in uniform on its 
pages this week. 



The printing press of the Plymouth Re- 
view, Wisconsin, is run by an English mastiff, 
Gypsy, bought several years ago from a 
stranded showman. When he does not run 
fast enough in his big treadmill wheel he is 
stimulated by the sight of the office cat. 




12 



Western Graphic 




ASBURY <i. SMITH , PHARMACIST. 

One of the finest drug houses of Southern 
California is that owned by Dr. Smith on the 
N. VV. corner of Raymond avenue and Colo- 
rado street, Pasadena. 

Dr. Smith is the successor to the Pasadena 
Drug Company. The house has been estab- 
lished for a number of years, is splendidly 
furnished throughout and fully stocked with a 
fresh and complete line of everything found 
in an up to date drugstore. What is thought 
and known of Dr. Asbury G. Smith in Pasa- 
dena and of his business is most aptly set 
forth in an article which appeared recently in 
the Pasadena Daily Star which is here repro- 
duced: 

Dr. Smith is a graduate of the Massachu- 
setts College of Pharmacy and of the medical 
department of Harvard. He has held respons- 
ible positions in the prescription pharmacies 
of Boston and was appointed superintendent 
of one of the largest state institutions of 
Massachusetts, being then the youngest man 
in the state holding such a position. Being 
ambitious he overworked himself and his 
health failed, necessitating a removal to Cali- 
fornia. Here he lived for ten years and has 
recovered his health, now entering business 
life in Pasadena. 

Dr. Smith is not entirely a stranger here, 
however. He has made his home in Pasadena 
while practicing medicine for two years in 
Los Angeles, and has formed pleasant church 
and social connections. He proposes to con- 
duct a drug store of the highest order — one 
that will be a complete pharmacy in every 
sense of the word — but nothing else. With a 
fine location and a magnificent store, a busi- 
ness conducted on the lines mentioned is sure 
of an abundant success. 



ROGERS & BROTHER'S COLD STORAGE MEATS. 

W. Rogers & Brother of the Pasadena 
Market, 26-28 North Fair Oaks avenue, are 
away up in the meat trade of their city. This 
firm has a complete automatic cold storage 
plant which uses no ice, and by this process 
meats are kept in much more natural state 
and better preservation than by the ice sys- 
tem. Rogers Brothers enjoy a fine trade. 

AN EPISODE OF POOR MAN'S CREEK. 

(By Ben. C. Truman.) 

HERE and there among the picturesque 
Sierra towns, environed by farms and 
orchards and vineyards, may be seen the ruins 
of vast systems of hydraulic mining and the 
everlasting remains of the less pretentious 
methods of securing auriferous sands. Here 
and there are long lines of deposits torn from 
the sides of lofty mountains and beds of enor- 



mous gulches piled up with the debris of 
millions of cubic feet of former gold-bearing 
dirt. At one sweep of the vision the traveler 
may behold where, in the years 1850-1, upon 
Poor Man's Creek, a tributary of Middle 
Feather, Flood and O'Brien, afterwards known 
as bonanza kings, toiled with pick and rocker 
and luxuriated on hard tack and salt horse ; 
where James G. Fair, since then a man of 
many millions and many liasons, and a pur- 
chased United States senatorship, manipulated 
the implements of placer mining on a rich, 
unshifting bar; where genial Tom Shannon, 
who for many years afterwards served his 
State in Congress and in both houses of the 
legislature, drove an ox team and peddled 
vegetables and meats; where James Johnson, 
afterwards lieutenant-governor and member 
of Congress, kept a grocery and general variety 
store, and where Creed Haymond, a brilliant 
and distinguished lawyer, was barkeeper in 
the principal saloon. 

It was in this saloon, one evening in June, 
1851, that a stylish-looking stranger from Bid- 
well's Bar received the surprise of his life. 
After taking his drink and treating the half 
dozen men present, he picked up a violin from 



the table and played, in a manner that showed 
he was no mean master of that instrument. 
Then he returned the violin to its place of be- 
longing and looked around, as much as to say: 
" You never heard such fiddling as that 
before in these parts, and you'll never hear it 
again." 

Just then Henderson entered, and a con- 
certed shout went up from all present. 

"Charlie! Give us a tune." 

Henderson took up the instrument, turned 
it over like an impressario, and then exe- 
cuted a pot pourri of the familiar Amer- 
ican airs of that day. Then he sat down, and 
for a few moments there was a running con- 
versation about, blue gravel, politics, and the 
new stage driver who had declined to drink. 

Presently Foster came in from Smith's Bar, 
and all cried: 

"Foster! Give us a tune." 

Foster proceeded straightway to accommo- 
date his companions and at once presented 
some of the finest selections from * Somnam- 
bula," "El Barbiere" and "Lucia," and be- 
trayed such a knowledge of the higher order 
of music and so much finish as a performer 
that the surprise of the stranger from Bid- 
well's was so terrific that his hat was actually 
raised from his head by the movement of his 
hair. He had never heard more brilliant 
playing in Boston where he had taken a good 
long course under a teacher of account. But 
before he could catch his breath in came 
Thompson, and up went the cry: 

"Thompsy, old man! Give us a tune." 

" By all that's great and good in heaven 
and Boston!" exclaimed the stranger to him- 
self, as "Thompsy" executed a cavatina from 
Beethoven's quartette in C minor. He thought 
he had never heard such richness, such in- 
strumentation, such intrepretation, such di- 
vinity of manifestation before — and he would 
have rushed up and embraced old man 
Thompson, as the latter returned the fine old 
mock] Stradivarius to the table, had not an- 
other miner come in and played a tune, and 
then another, and another, until there were 
seventeen men in the bar room who had 
played on that violin, and many of the rendi- 
tions were of a difficult or dashing kind. 

It was too much for the stylish stranger 
from Bidwell's. And so, when the last of them 
had drawn the bow and returned the violin to 
the table, he proceeded to the bar and ex- 
claimed: 

"Come up! everybody! Drink with me! 
I have heard tell of 'Fiddler's Green.' And I 
guess I've landed there. Thompsy, old man! 
Give us another tune! " 




RODGERS BROS.' MARKET 



Western Graphic 



23 




California is rapidly forging to the front 
as one of the leading wine producing sections 
of the world. For many years California 
growers have had to contend with lack of ap- 
preciation on the part of the consumers who 
would drink California wines under foreign 
labels, while decrying the home product, this 
being the case not only with eastern people 
but with residents of the state as well. The 

tide is, however, turning and there is a steadi- 
ly increasing demand for the pure product of 
the California grape to be sold under its prop- 
er name. Wine is made on a large scale in a 
dozen counties of California, among which Los 
Angeles county takes a leading rank. Among 
the best known wineries of Southern Califor- 
nia is that of the Sierra Madre Vintage Com- 
pany, established by the Hon. J. F. Crank 
and the late H. Brizdon. Mr. Herman Blatz, 
who has been connected with the corporation 
for over ten years, is its superintendent. It is 
situated in Lamanda off Colorado street be- 
tween Pasadena and Sierra Madre and is one 
of the important points of interest for visitors 
and tourists, and not a little of the fame for 
which it is noted has gone forth from the 
numbers who have already been shown over 
the vineyarding, winery and its large storage 
cellars containing rare old Port, Sherry, Musca- 



great wine cellars, ferm 
enting houses, cooper 
shops, sherry house, dis- 
tillery, store rooms, etc. 

There is a switch con- 
necting with the Santa 
Fe Railway and they 
deal directly with the 
large jobbing houses of 
the east. By adhering 
to the policy of running 
most of the fine old vin- 
tages their extensive cel- 
lars contain some the 
rarest, oldest and most 
valuable wines in Cali- 
fornia and they are 
known as their private 
stock goods. The drug 
trade and the various 
hospitals of our country 
draw largely upon these 
cellars as do also the 
most noted hotels in 
America, including Ho- 
tel Green, La Pintoresca, 

etc., and much of it is used for sacra- 
mental purposes. Many visitors avail 
themselves of this opportunity of securing 
rare old and guaranteed absolutely pure wine 
from the producers who, by a special arrange- 
ment, are prepared to deliver them, freight 
prepaid, at their homes in the east. 

To accommodate their large local trade 
they deliver in Pasadena twice a week, free 
of extra charge. They also produce unfer- 
mented grape juice, and have made quite a 
reputation for themselves with the orange 
wine made from oranges grown upon their 
premises. The latter is a pleasant and excel- 
lent tonic for people who are run down, ner- 
vous or suffering from stomach troubles. 




A. A. BI.KY'S HKI G STORK 



Pierce Photo 



BROWN EXCELS IN HIS LINE. 

The manufacture of everything in the line 




Am. Eng. Co. 



tel, Tokay, Madeira, Zinfandel, Hocks, etc., and 
Brandies. The soil thereabouts is especially 
adapted to the growth and culture of grapes; 
rich with the calcareous washings from the 
mountains, nourished by the sun and dew, 
the possibilities supplied by naiural advan- 
tages are unsurpassed, and under the shadows 
of the mountains of the Sierra Madre range 
are nestled these extensive vineyards, estab- 
lished in 1869, that produce the different va- 
rieties of grapes including'the Trousseau, Mal- 
voisie, Muscatel, Tokay, Zinfandel, Petit Bon- 
chet, etc , from which their wines are made. 

The plant of the company is a very exten- 
sive one, covering acres of ground, including 



THE SIERRA MADRE VINTAGE CO.'S PROPERTY Pierce, Photo 

of carved leather goods is handled in a thor- 
oughly experienced manner by L. F. Brown, 
whose salesrooms are at 45 South Raymond 
avenue. Mr. Brown's display of Mexican 
hand carved goods is splendid in every detail. 



A SUPERIOR DRUG STORE. 

A. A. Bley conducts a drug house of good 
stock and equipment on North Fair Oaks 
avenue. Mr. Bley's place is well known and 
enjoys a prosperous patronage. Prescriptions 
are carefully compounded from a stock fresh 
and skillfully selected. 



Sunflower seed has a commercial value as 
food for parrots and as a substitute for pea- 
nuts in candy and it is not surprising it has 
recently been cornered. And Kansas stood 
by]and permited its staple flower to adorn the 
buttonhole of a trust! 



HALT! 

There is a 

Military boarding 

School 

In Southern California 

Mental Boys 
Physical and Made 
Military Training Manly 

Parents will find our illustrated CATALOGUE 
helpful in deciding upon a school to which to 
send their sons. Mailed free upon application. 

Los Angeles Military Academy 

Near Westlake Park. At terminus of Traction 
Line, Westlake Park. 

C. C. Emery, A. M., Principal, 

Walter K. Wheat Manager 




E.LMS 

Detective 
Agency 



Will undertake all legitimate Detective work intrusted 
to it by Railroads or Corporations, Banks, Mer- 
cantile Houses, A ttorneys Private, liitflvidualR 

Special facilities for operating in the East and abroad 

Very best of references . ' r-, m „ .... 

Tel. Main r,i8 JflO. P. EllTlS, Principal 

Rooms 112-113-142 Wilson Block, Los Ang-eles 




LEATHER GOODS FROM L. F. BROWN'S BTORK 



Western Graphic 




COOKING ROOM 



THROOP POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

The Throop Polytechnic Institute of Pasa- 
dena, Los Angeles County, California, Walter 
A. Edwards, president, is one of the most 
thoroughly known and widely recognized edu- 
cational organizations of the Pacific Coast. 
Its founder, Hon. Amos G. Throop, was a na- 
tive of New York, born in 1811, and died 
at Pasadena in 1894. He founded Throop 
Institute in 1891, bequeathing to it the greater 
part of his property, and to the time of his 
death he energetically encouraged and fostered 
its interests. 

The object of the institution is to give to 
students of both sexes a liberal, practical edu- 
cation, thoroughly Christian but non sectarian. 

Departments. — The four departments of 
the institute are: The Sloyd Grammar, for all 
work below the high school ; the Manual 
Training Academy, the Normal Department 
and the College. 

Halls. — Polytechnic Hall, which was the 
first structure erected on the institute grounds, 
is a substantial brick building and contains 
most of the shops and laboratories. In this 
building is the wood shop, fully equipped, 
where each student has his set of tools and 
does so many hours' work each day. Some of 
the machinery in this department is the 
manufacture of the students themselves. The 
pattern shop adjoins the wood shop, and there 
the student is trained in designing of all 
kinds, blue print work, architectural designing 
and map making. The forging room, in the 
same building, is equipped for twenty-three 
pupils, and here is taught every feature of 
work in the forging line. An engine, directly 
connected with generator, built by students, 
is now nearly ready for use in the machinery 
department. 

The machine shop is furnished with a very 
fine 55 horse power engine, lathes, planers, 
drills, emery grinder and other adjuncts of a 
good machine shop, thoroughly equipping it 




for the practice of the students. 

For the young ladies of the institute, in 
this same building are found the sewing rooms 
and cooking departments. In the former de- 
partment the equipment and instruction are 
thoroughly domestic. The cooking depart- 
ment is in skillful hands, and not only are the 
students taught how, but also why, they do 
their work. Their instruction in other depart- 
ments enables them to understand the compo- 
sition of food and all the ingredients used in 
preparation of various dishes. They also learn 
the planning of meals, table service and mar- 
keting. 

The chemical laboratory, also in Polytech- 
nic Hall, is well furnished with the apparatus 
necessary in that department. 

East Hall, the second building erected on 
the grounds, fronts Chestnut street, and 
cost, finished, almost forty thousand dollars. 
The first floor is devoted to the offices, recita- 
tion rooms, Sloyd Grammar School and 
physical laboratory. On the second floor is 
the assembly room, the toilet and cloak rooms 
and department of biology. Here an analysis 
is being made for bacteria in the water fur- 
nished Pasadena by the Lake Vineyard Water 
Co. The third floor has a room furnished for 
the literary organizations of the institution, 
and here also is the museum, drawing, paint- 
ing, designing and photography departments. 

The basement is used for the electrical de- 
partment, which is especially well equipped, 
carrying students into the advanced work of 
electrical engineering. Here is some more 
work of the schools' students, among it a skill- 
fully made switch-board, perfect in every de- 
tail. 

The gymnasium, which is a newly added 
feature under a special instructor, is also lo- 
cated in the basement. 

In the Sloyd rooms there is every evidence 
of the earnest and progressive work of the 
students. Here cabinet work of all kinds is 



PHYSICAL LABORATORY 

handled, and later, in the wood shop, work in 
inlaid wood designs,- now so popular, is carried 
on. 

The clay modeling and wood carving rooms 
display several specimens of work done by 
pupils, a bust of Emerson and one of a living 
model, together with some very clever wood 
carving. 

The schedule of work in the institute covers 
all the practical lines here given, and together 
with such training, a thorough instruction in 
the fundamental principles of every branch 
recognized in the leading schools, academies 
and colleges of this country. In the art de- 
partment, freehand drawing, designing and 
painting is fully and practically covered, as 
the work turned out by students of the insti- 
tution proves. 

There are several literary organizations, a 
mandolin and guitar orchestra, a debat- 
ing club, baseball and football teams, a 
tennis court and other methods of recreation. 
Every care is taken of the health, morals and 
well being of every student. 

The Board of Trustees comprises some of 
Pasadena's best business and professional 
men. Mr. J. W. Hugus, one of the Board of 
Trustees, has made an offer of $10,000 to the 
school if the present debt can be paid, that 
sum to apply thereon. He has otherwise 
offered $17,000, if an endowment fund of 
$100,000 can be made up. The officers and 
friends of the institution are working earnestly 
to avail themselves of Mr. Hugus' liberality, 
and have already secured several thousand 
dollars. If people who believe in a 
judicious combination of mental and manual 
instruction will rally the debt will soon be a 
matter of the past and a handsome endow- 
ment fund secured. 

Visitors are always welcome at the Insti- 
tute, and catalogues may be had free on 
application to the Secretary and Business 
Agent, David Heap. 






ENGINE TESTING— PRONY BRAKE 



SEWING RUOM 



Western Graphic 




WHEN Augustus Thomas' name is pre- 
ceded by the title of a comedy and 
the little preposition " by," one feels secure in 
the extreme against being inflicted with even 
a mediocre entertainment. And when the 
roles of the play are taken by dainty Pilar- 
Morin, graceful Rose Eytinge and Clement 
Bainbridge, there is nothing else to be desired 
but the comfortable seat and cheerful atmos- 
phere that is characteristic of the Orpheum. 
" That Overcoat " is like moonshine — it leaves 
no mark but a feeling of having been enter- 
tained, and that is what we go to the Orpheum 
for. 

George Golden'must have had a long talk 
with his friend Casey since last week, and 
Casey must have been in an extraordinarily 
funny mood. It is a paradoxical remark, but 




LOUIS JAMES 

with all his dry humor, Mr. Golden does not 
allow a dry minute during his whole perfor- 
mance, yet everyone feels in such a good hu- 
mor that it is almost compulsory to " wet up" 
after his turn. 




MR. JAMES A8 " CHARLES SURFACE" 

It is a coincidence that there should be 
two funny men of the same name on one bill, 
but Horace Golden entertains chiefly with 
some very clever slight-of-hand tricks and his 
witticisms are but the sauce piquant. 

Mons. and Mme. Rofix have solved the 



problem of finding the center of gravity and 
maintaining an equilibrium in an astonishing 
degree. After balancing chairs and tables 
and other such articles of furniture M. Rofix 
poises a piano upon his chin and would no 
doubt continue his performance by juggling 
box cars and locomotives if the confines of 
the stage would permit it. 

Lovers of black face work say that Riley 
and Hughes are better than the average and 
the program is rounded out with the sweet 
singing of Julius \Vitmark,the tricks of Batty's 
bears and the three Lukens acrobats. 



IT IS at this season of the year when girls 
are the admirers instead of the admired 
and the U. C. Glee Club boys were the lords 




KATHRYN KIDDER 

THERE is an old biblical passage that has 
been paraphrased into common usage 
to the effect that one should not hide their 
light under a bushel. This rarely applicable 
admonition can'be reservedly given to Nance 
O'Neil; yet without the slightest derogation 
to her supporting company, for the flashes 




MISS KIDDER AS " LADY TEAZLE." 

of true genius ithat mark many points in her 
acting show that there is only necessary a 
highly artistic environment to bring to this 
young woman the fame of a Mary Anderson. 
Of Miss O'Neil's support Mr. Clarke and Mr. 
Rankin do some excellent work, and the per- 
formances as a whole were excellent — beyond 
cavil as good or better than could be reason- 
ably expected for the money. The few who 
were deterred from going to the theater on 
the stormy evenings reckoned not on the large 
amount of comfort and good entertainment 
to be obtained at the Burbank for a small 
piece of money. 



FRED. RICK WARDE 

of creation as they sat upon the stage of the 
L03 Angeles theater Monday evening. But 
their concert was clever and entertaining and 
no one envies them the adoration of the pretty 
high school girls but the young fellows who 
were temporarily "not in it." 

Yon Yonson is an old favorite wherein the 




MR. WARDE AS "JOSEPH SURFACE " 

illiteracy of the character whose name is the 
title role furnishes the humor^and the simple 
honesty and bravery of the same person the 
moral. Mr. Ben Hendricks is a capital 
"Yon " and is ably supported by Anna Mack 
Berlein, Georgia Bryton and a good company. 
The log jam scene is an especially effective 
piece of stage setting and the snow-covered 
surroundings are real enough to give one a 
most delightful shiver. Yon Yonson is on for 
a bargain matinee this afternoon and tonight. 



THE starry theatrical firmament of this 
country to day is well crowded, but the 
stars who flicker there are many of one order 
and but few of another. The comedians, 
farceurs, operatic and comedy drama stars are 
in the majority — a great majority — the tra- 
gedy queens being few and far between. This 
is, of course, not without good and sufficient 
reason. An actress to-day, with the glittering 
offers of the vaudeville and the offers held out 
for feature positions in big productions, cares 
little to try and win favor in the trying legiti- 



16 



Western Graphic 



mate. Among the few stars in this line who have to-day the much 
sought after smile of the theatre-going public is Nance O'Neil, who be- 
gins her second week at the Burbank Mon- day night. Her triumphs 
in the legitimate have been clear cut, production after production 
having been staged by her, and the firstto meet with disfavor is yet to 
be offered. 



Los Angeles Theater — The James-Kldder-Warde Combination.— It is natural 
that the play-going public should be impressed by the announcement of such a 
star aggregation as that of Mr. Louis James, Mr. Frederick Warde and Miss 
Kathryn Kidder, which will be the extraordinary attraction at the Los Angeles 
Theater during the coming week, with the following attractive and brilliant reper- 
toire, namely: Monday and jFriday evenings and Saturday matinee, "The School 




for Scandal"; Tuesday and Thursday evenings, "Julius Caesar"; Wednesday 
matinee, " Hamlet," and Saturday evening, " Macbeth." 

Although popular interest centers in the distinguished stars and the elaborate 
revivals that will be given by this company, it is a great satisfaction to the exacting 
tastes of to-day to know that the stars will be supported by people who are entirely 
worthy of the leading lights of the organization. Messrs. Wagenhals and 
Kemper, the managers of this big enter- 
prise, have recognized the fact that it is 
necessary, in order to present a complete 
and harmonious production of each play 
of their repertoire, to engage competent 
people for all the roles. They have, there- 
fore, secured a company numbering thir- 
ty-two people, nearly all of whom have 
been chosen with special reference to 
their fitness for their certain parts. 

Among the people who will support 
this great triumvirate is Mr. Harry Lang- 
don, the best "old man" on the legiti- 
mate stage of America. Mr. LangUon 
has been conspicuously associated with 
all the leading legitimate stars of our 
stage for a number of years. He has no 
peer in such roles as Sir Peter Teazle, 
Brabantio, Polonius, Casca and the like. 

Mr. Barry Johnstone, who has been 
leading man with Mr. James for the past 
two seasons, has distinguished himself in 
a varied line of characters. He is an 
earnest actor and a finished artist, and 
his support will be a big factor iu the 
coming engagement. Mr. Collin Kem- 
per, who was a member of the Daly com- 
pany for several years, including a Lon- 
don season, is another strong member of 
the company. Mr. Kemper is an exceed- 
ingly natural actor and comes as near as possible to a modernly colloquial read- 
ing of the classics. He is always interesting and effective. 

Mrs. Henry Vandenhoff, widow of the great Henry Vandenh off, isa particu- 
larly, strong ally in this elaborate undertaking, for she is thoroughly familiar 
with the best traditions of the legitimate stage and is an artist of exceptional 
attainment. Other notable people are Mr. Norman Hackett, Mr. W. A. Lincoln, 
Mr. Frank Peters, Mr. Chas. Clark, Mr. Thomas Coffin Cooke, Miss Loreta 
Wells and Miss Aphie James, all of whom have been engaged for their peculiar 
fitness to responsible roles in thevarious casts. 




MME. PILAR MORIN 
in "That Overcoat" at the Orpheum 



Burbank — Manager Shaw has been fortunate enough to secure the "young 
California tragedienne. Nance O'Neil, for an additional week's stay at the Bur- 
bank during which this beautiful and brilliant stage queen will appear in three 
new roles. On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings and at the matinee 
Wednesday Miss O'Neil will present a new review of the.favorite emotional play, 
"East Lynne."On Thursday and Friday nights and Saturday matinee "Guy Man- 
nering" will be given for the first time in this city, Nance O'Neil appearing as 
the old gypsy of Scott's great novel, "Meg Merrilles," the character made famous 
by Charlotte Cushman. McKee Rankins' play, "The Danites," will be presented 
Saturday and Sunday nights. 

Y. M. C. A.— C. S. DeLano's Guitar, Banjo and Mandolin Club give the first 
concert of theirninth season Monday evening, January 16, at the Y. M. C. A. hall. 
A choice program has been prepared and the reputation of the club is a guar- 
antee of a rare treat. They will be assisted by Miss Angelena L. Anderson, our 
popular reader. 



Orpheum— If Europe were scoured and scraped for splendid vaudeville attrac- 
tions, there could not be a finer assortment of features secured than the Orpheum 
announces it will present next week. Three of the four new acts are direct im- 
portations of the Walter Orpheum Co., and one of the holdovers (Mons. Rofix, 
the strong man) is a famous attraction in Paris. 




NANCE O'NEIL 



Mansard-Collier Eng. Co. 



UEROME HELMONT 



Western Graphic 



17 



The star card of the bill is a Russian importa- 
tion — the Rappo Sisters. These girls have won a 
unique fame in the principal capitals of Europe, com- 
manding salaries by the side of which even a king's 
ransom is made to look small. They have just com- 
pleted a month's engagement in San Francisco, at the 
Orpheum — an unprecedented thing for such an act as 
theirs, where the same thing must be done each week. 
Their dancing is the perfection of grace and terpsi- 
chorean skill, according to report, and a sensation is 
expected to be created by them while at the Orpheum 
here. 

An equilibrist from Austria, Ozeola, is another 
European act. The performance given by Ozeola 
formed a principal feature of Koster and Bial's bill in 
New York last month. It is well known that this 
mutiic hall plays only the finest of European vaude- 
ville acts, and in this instance as in others the Orph- 




GEO. FULLER GOLDEN, " Casey's Friend," at the Orpheum 

eum takes the acts directly upon their close at Koster 
and Bial's Ozeola will defy every law of gravitation, 
it is predicted, and make all other equilibrists look, 
as the saying is, "like thirty cents." 

The Two Deltorellis are a team of French mus- 
ical grotesques who have a splendid reputation as 
fun makers of a sort not common in the New World. 
They come directly from Paris here, except for the 
playing of a short engagement in New York, by per- 
mission of the Orpheum Co., under whose direction 
they will later tour the country. 

Anna Teresa Berger, the world-renowned cornet- 
ist, whose genius, as exemplified in her performances 
on the cornet, has made the name of Berger familiar 
as a household word, has a prominent place on the 
bill. She will doubtless be given an ovation by her 
admirers here. 

Mons. and Mme, Rofix, the chin balancers; Pilar 
Morin, Rose Eytinge and Clement Bainbridge, in 
"That Overcoat"; and George Fuller Golden, "Casey's 
Friend," retained for a third week, complete the bill. 

Papinta, the fire dancer, is coming soon. 



Helmont, the Juvenile Ole Bull -Subscription lists 
for the Helmont concerts to be given at Simpson 
Auditorium on the evenings of January 26 and 27, 
and matinee on the 28th, are now in the hands of sev- 
eral of our prominent music lovers and musicians, 
and a wide interest is awakened by the co ning of this 
famous thirteen year-old lad, subscribers beir.g prom- 
ised first choice of seats No young artist has ever 
scored such triumphs throughout the East as Hel- 
mont since the debut of little Joseph Hoffman. 

Miss Ida Simmons, the distinguished pianist, and 
Miss Grace Preston, who is the possessor of a stroDg. 
resonant voice and will be remembered as the noted 
contralto with Nordica last sesson, will be the assist- 
ing artists. The Los Angeles series is under the 
management of Mr. J. T. Fitzgerald. 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIRST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudevil 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, Jan. 16. 

Kappo Sisters, Russia's Wonderful I erpsichorean Artistes 
Willie Ozeola, Marvelous Equilibrist 
Oeo. Fuller Golden, " Casey's Friend," the talk of the city 
Anna Teresa Berger, World's Best Lady Cornet Virtuoso 
I) llorelli Brothers, European Musical Grotesques 

Pilar Morin ) Producing Augustus Thomas' pleas- 

Ko.e fcytinge V , Comedy, " That Overcoat" 

Clement Bainbridge J 7™ " 

Mons. and Mme. Kolix, in extraordinary feats of strength 

EVENING 25 and 50 cts, gallery 10c. Matinees Wednesday 
Saturday and Sunday, any seat in the house 'J5c 




nFAFNF^Q The Auraphone 

ULftl II LOU of any one not bo 



is a new invention which 
vlll restore the Hearing of 
fanyone not born deaf. Invisible in the 
Ear, causing no discomfort. It is to the Ear what glasses are to 
the Eve. Send for pamphlet, mailed FREE. Tells how to re- 
store lost hearing, prevent deainess, and enable any-fl II n T f| 
one to hear the faintest sound. Address, |i M If P. JJ 

F. F. FIN LAY, 529 Ellis St.. San Francisco" 



Girls, listen to this, 

And see what you will miss: 

No more full dress balls 

Till the doctor calls, 

For the board of health 

Is meeting by stealth; 

And so low-necked gowns 

(How dreadful it sounds) 

And upper left arms 

Are to be banished ! 

And maidens mannish 

Are to take their place, 

And cover that space. 

For vaccination 

Is the proclamation ! 



L 



OS ANGELES THEATER 



Tel. 
Main 70 

C. M. WOOD, and H. C. WY ATT, Lessees. 
Extraordinary Event. Seats Now on Sale for 



mm 



KriTHRYN FUEh 



Monday and Fridav Eveninss— THE FCHOOL FOR SCANDAL 
Tuesday and Thursday Evenings— JULIUS CAESAR 
Wednesday Matinee— HAMLET 
Wednesday Night-0 1 HELLO Saturday Night— MACBETH 

PRICES— Lower Floor, $1.50; Loges, $2.00. Boxes, 82.50; 
Balcony, $1.00, 75c, 50c; Gallery, 25c. Tel. Main 70. 

T3URBANK THEATER 

1 Main St., bet. Fifth and Sixth. Tel. M 1270 

■ m ~-^ C. A. SHAW, Lessee 

One More Week, 

The Young American Tragedienne, 



OOO'I UU 11 Li " ^Si I 1 — i V C=5' U " I ' — i ll I 1 — inno 
(Direction McKee Rankin) 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday Nights, and Wednesday Matinee, 
"EAST LYNNE " 
Thursday and Fridav Nights and Saturday Matinee, 

" GUY MANNERING." 
Saturday and Sunday Nights, " THE DANITES." 
PRICES— 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c; Loge Seats, 75c; Box Seats. SI. 00. 

FURNITURE AND CARPETS 

WHEEL CHAIRS a 

Sold or Rented specialty 

Second Hand Goods Bought, Sold 
or Exchanged 
I. T. MARTIN, 531-533 So. Spring SI. 




Haviland China, Cut Glass, Art Goods 
Dinner Sets, Lamps, Sterling Silverware 

Parmelee's 
Retiring 



From business sale affords an except- 
ional opportunity to buyers of Holiday 
Goods. It is here that you will secure 
unusually 



Large 
Discounts 



REMEMBER THE NUMBER 

232-234 SO. SPRING ST. 

LOS ANGELES 
CAL. 



12 SHAVE TICKET $1.00 HAIRCUT 15c 
1 SHAVE IOC 




Blue front 
Barber Shop 

Hurry Woods, Prop 

503 West Sixth St. 
LOS ANGELES 



CITY STEAM 

Oarpet Gleaning 
WORKS. 

Laying, Bordering 
and Bentting (,' a r- 
peU, Furniture Pack- 
ing, Repairing & Up-, 
holstermg. Tel. M. 427. 
JOHN BLOKSKK 
Office, 456 S. Broadway 




Chocolate Creams 

— Cream Bon Bons 

Largest Assortment cAbways Fresh 
Glace Fruits Send a box East 
Salted Almonds Fresh every day 




LOS ANGELE5 




447 So. SpriiiK St. 



CHatches, Clocks a ". d "Jewelry 

Carefully Repaired and (Qarranted 



Telephone 
...M 1159 



S* Conradi 

Optician, {Hatcbmakcr 

Hnd & 



•fine Diamond Setting 

H Specialty... 



113 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



Achoice assortment of Diamonds, Jewelry andiWatches 
always on hand, 



m 

mi 
mz 

mi 
mi 
mi 



NEW LOCATION 



ST0LL & THAYER CO. 

BOOKSELLERS 
STATIONERS 
and ENGRAVERS 



253-254 S. Spring St. 
Stimson Block 



LOS ANGELES 
'Phone Main 649 



3* 



Jngleside floral Company & 

f. Gdward 6ray, p rop . 

140 South Spring St 

Celephone Main 568. 

We grow all our flowers and plants at our 
Nurseries at Alhambra. 





Three medals awarded at Hamburg Exposi- 
tion for Gladiolus and Amaryllis. Particu- 
lar description of these and other fine flowers 
originated by us will be mailed on applicatiuo. 

Your Face SSiiiwSSSSii 

n Have you Called at °% 

OH rflper.. "The Angelo Studio?" ijg 

It will pay you if you contemplate giving 
your friends a Foto for Xuias. ^ 
Our work speaks for itself. £ft 
Only High Grade work given to our Patrons 

BYRNE, BUILDING * 

s 



Third and Broadway 



NEW STOCK CONSTANTLY ARRIVING 



HAWLEY, KING & CO., 



Cor. Broadway 

and Fifth Street 



18 



Western Graphic 




SPRING OF '99 




j|N CALIFORNIA winter is such an obsolete season in reality that Western Graphic will christen its big annual 
number, that is to issue the latter part of February, (which in less favored climes would be correctly called "mid- 
winter") "The Spring of 99" edition. This will be an edition of forty or more pages, edited with the most 
painstaking accuracy, illustrated as only the WESTERN Graphic can illustrate and the cover will be a photo-chrome repro- 
duction of a water color painted expressly for the journal by Miss M. E. Curran, a talented young artist of Los An- 
geles. Without exception this will be the finest newspaper cover ever printed in the United States. 

This number will be most entertaining for eastern people and will be sold wrapped for mailing at 25 cents per copy. 
Application for advertising space and orders for copies should be addressed to 

Western Graphic 

311=313 New High Street, Los Angeles 



FINEST BARBER SHOP SOUTH OF VAN NUYS HOTEL IN CONNECTION 



Plain 
Electric 



BATHS 



Medicated 
Vapor 



From 15 cts to 5o cts 

Ladies private entrance on Wall street 



F. J. MOLL, JR., Proprietor 

252 EAST FIFTH ST 



William % Staats Co. 



INVESTMENT BANKERS 
AND BROKERS 



HUMHEL BROS. & CO. 



TELEPHONE 

MAIN 509 



Employment Agents 



Basement California 
Bank Building 

Carefully selected help of all kiuds promptly furnished 
Strictly reliable and largest agency on Pacific coast 



300 West Second St Cor - 



Broadway 



Stocks, "Bonds 
and Mortgages 
Bought and Sold 



Cor. Raymond Hvcnuc 

Hnd Green St. 



Telephone Main 3 PASADENA 



Western Graphic 



19 



FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 

Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cat,. 

Entered at the postoffice iu Los Angeles as second-class mail matter. 
SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. 

Copies, Five Cents: Edition de Luxe, per Copy, Ten Cents. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 



Single 



We Solicit Contributions of Short Stories and Articles of Interest about Southern 
California, which we will pay for at our regular rates. The usual 
rules regarding Anonymous Contributions and 
Rejected Mss. will be observed. 



We 
To know 



I 1 something more about the details and techni- 
f\t I QT ll f calities of printing than you — don't you think? 

%■ In our experience we have seen thousands of 
dollars wasted through the ignorance of cus- 
tomers on apparently trivial points. People 
have come to us with speciScations upon which 
they wished us to estimate. Most printers 
would make the figure as requested, and, if the 
lowest bidder, go ahead with the work, on a basis of waste from beginning to 
end We always try to explain these points to a prospective customer, but 
hav e had men go out mad, because, as they said, we " questioned their ability 
to decide what they wanted." But we have made many more friends than 
ene mies, and will continue that policy. Believing that many will appreciate 
e advantages of obtaining the benefit of our experience and close touch with 
the advertising world, we have established an 

ADVISORY DEPARTMENT. 

This is in charge of an experienced advertising man, who has the co-operation 
of the heads of the printing departments. For the small fee of $1.00 he will 
take up any proposition in relation to advertising and the printing of advertis- 
ing matter, and advise you as to the probable result of the advertisement, make 
out specifications as to paper, type, ink, size, binding, etc., furnish dummies 
and samples, and give such other information as may come within the scope of 
his training. This department is entirely outside of our printing business, 
though we will, of course, be pleased to furnish you estimates if you request it. 

It may pay you to consult this department, even on your office stationery, 
and a simple statement from you that you are not satisfied with your invest- 
ment will bring back your dollar. 

Address: 

GEO. RICE & SONS (Inc.), 

311-313 New High Street, 
Advisory Dept. Los Angeles, Cal. 



to the 



Tickets 
§j Horse Show... 



Everybody who has One dollar to spend will 
take someone and go to the Horse Show. 

WesternGmphic 

Will give to each new six-months subscriber 

A Present of Two Tickets to the 
Horse Show 

Think of it ! Twenty-six issues of the finest 
illustrated paper 011 the Pacific Coast and two 
50-cent tickets to the show for $1.00. Call at or 
address 



Oldest and Largest Bank In Southern 
California 

Farmers <t Merchants Bank 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) $500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total Sl,42fi,742 



OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

G. HEIMANN Assistant Cashier 



DIRECTORS 
W. H. Perry C. E. Thorn A. Glassell 

O. W. Childs L W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 
J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 



*S*SpecIaI Collection Department. Oursafety 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent in its new fire and burglar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 



Mail] Street Savings Bank 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

APTTAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

| Interest paid on deposits 

Monev loaned on real estate only 

I\ L. DUQUE ...President 

I. N. VAN NUYS V^ce- President 

B. V. DUQUK Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Kasper Cohn, H. 
W. O'Melveuy, J. B. Lankershim, O. T. Johnson, 
T. L. Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. O. Kerckhoff, A. 
Haas. 



Annual Statement 



IDr-uLggist 
andL Cine: mist 

222 N. Main St., Lanfranco Blk. 



W. H. Perry, Pres. W. A. Morgan, See 

S. H. Mott, Vice-President. 

W. H. Perry 
Lumber 
and Mill Company 

Agents for the 

St. Paul and Tacoma Lumber Co., Tacoma, Wash 

«S MINING TIMBERS 

Correspondence Solicited 

136 Commercial St. Los Angeles. Jal. 



NOTICE. 

The Los Angeles City Water Company wil 
strictly enforce the following rule: The nours for 
sprinkling are between 6 and 8 o'clock a. m. and 
6 and 8 o'clock p. m. For a violation of the 
above regulation the water will be shut off, and 
a fine of $2.00 will be charged before the water 
will be turned or again. 



These two figures represent two pets formerly 
belonging to abner L. Ross the owner of the 

HOTEL ROSSLYN 

on Main street opposite the Post Office in 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

Mr. Bear was kept at his slimmer tome at Deer 
Lodge up in the mountains of Tennessee — Mrs. 
Al. I. Gator was kept in his Lake at his former 
winter home in Interlacheu, Florida; but Mr. 
Ross has adopted Los Angeles, Cal. as his future 
home and may ship a lot of Aligators here as 
presents for our Elysian Park. 



J. W. FULLER 

DEALER IN 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, 
JEWELRY, SILVERWARE and 
OPTICAL GOODS 

A good line of Holiday Novelties 

315 NORTH MAIN 

Opp Farmers and Merchants Hank. 



Tel Main 1053 Geo. Rice & Sons (Inc.) 

3"-3«3 New High St. 



(ft) 



© Simon Maier 



Wholesale 
Butcher and 
Packer 

Telephone Main 155 

149-151-153 N. Spring Street 



' We have during the year 
just closing disposed of more 
Wall Paper than any other 
house in Southern California. 

Walter Bros. 

627 SO. SPRING STREET 
Tel. Main 1055 



The Largest Printing House ft^SKS 

by Geo. Rice 8c Sons, 311-313 (ground floor) New 
High street, near Temple. They print everything 
from visiting cards to city directories, at prices 
that make and keep customers. They print 
The Western Graphic and twenty odd others 
Don't have any printing done until you see 
l""" ""d get prices. 



Creamery Building^ 

a new departure 

in Creamery construction 

Write us for particulars.... 

Separators, Vats, Churns, or 

Anything you need 

To Make Butter or Cheese 
Spend one stamp on us. 

F. M. WILSON & CO. 

Selma, Clark Co., Ohio. 




THE BEST THING YOU CAN DO 
IS TO TRY A HOME REMEDY 

You have catarrh; perhaps you 
(lon't know it, but one bottle 
of the MEXICAN Campornia 
Catarrh Cure will make a 
new head for you, and then 
you will know that you feel 
absolutely all rijjht, so you 
must have had something like 
catarrh. Di not procrastinate: time is 
precious. See 
W. s. BALL, s»iv Manufacturer, 

Home at Office 
1016 E 82nd si. in Stowell mock 
Los Angeles 8o. Spring sf 



Patents 



Gopijriahts 
Trade Marks 
Labels 



TOWNSEND BROS. 

Tel. Alain 347 .'121-324 I'lilomnc lllo. k 
IEroH<l wuy 
Xo( Angelnn, Cal. 




Bankrupt Sale 



or 



FURNITURE 



43p=441 



South Main Street 

Opposite Post Office 



f"HE Entire Stock of Furniture and Carpets of the 
AKRON FURNITURE CO. for sale at 60 cents on 
the dollar, and must be sold before January 15. 



McCALL'S FASHION AND HOME MAGAZINE 5ctS 




Fur Collarettes Reduced 

There is nothing more dressy, stylish and comfortable than 
;i pretty fur collarette, and every woman can afford to have one 
or two of them at these price?: 

Ten-inch Collarette, of Electric Coney Fur, fancy two-color 
brocade silk lining, $4 00 instead of $5.00. 

Ten-inch Electric Seal Collarette, yoke of Black Astrakhan, 
satin lined, $8.75 instead of $12.00. 

Ten-inch Electric Seal Collarette, trimmed with Marten tabs 
and Black Astrakhan, $10.00 instead of $18.50. 

Twelve inch Electric Seal Collarettes, trimmed with Astra- 
khan, lined with brocade silk, now $15.00 instead of $20.00. 

Electric Seal Collarette, tabs 27 inches long, trimmed with 
Black Astrakhan, 10 Marten tabs and two heads, lined with 
satin, at $15.00 instead of $18.00. 



Mmf. Idaline gives facial treatment free daily from 10 to 12 m. 

317=325 SOUTH BROADWAY 

Laugfhlin Building 



NEW FIRM 
NEW 

MANAGEMENT. 



City Dye and 
Cleaning Works 




345 



It looks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit 



South Broadway 

We Use the Improved Dry Process and 
Clean Everything: from an . . . 

EVENING DRESS 
to a NECKTIE fe^^fe^fe^ 

Positively No Shrinking. Old Garments 
made to look like new. 

Try Us Just Once 

Have Your Clothing- Cleaned 
Ready for Holidays 

Goods Called For and Delivered 
to any Part of City 

DURAND & M0FFITT, Props. 

TEL. MAIN 551 



WENDELL EASTON 
President 



GEORGE EASTON 

Vice-President 



GEO. D. EASTON 

Secretary 



ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK 
Treasurer 



ft 



Be up ;to date and invest your money where it will bring quick 
returns. Invest in the most attractive part of the city, the 

MENLO PARK TRACT 

Large Lots. Streets Improved. Two Car Lines, but twelve minutes 
from business center. Nobby homes building in every block. 

It will pay you to call on us. 

EASTON ELDRIDGE & Co. 



21 SOUTH BROADWAV 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



"ress of leo. Rice & Sons (Inc..) 311 313 New High Street 



Western Graphic 



COPY RIGHTED 1S9B 



>in ILLUSTRATED WEEKLY JOUfcrtAL 
H FOR !^T1! ^^ 





Los Angeles, Saturday, January 21, J 899. 




1. Ei.i.a ?othei:n 2. LUCII.E Nl'NN :i. ClIAA. WlLLARD"7~ 4. CHA8. (i. Stkvkns S. Bahton ill I I 

BARTON HILL-CHAS. WILLARD AND COMPANY IN MILTON NOBLE'S COMEDY 

BELINDA BAILEY'S BOARDERS 






Western Graphic 




Most 
Novel 
Present 
Money 
Can Buy 

Reproduces music of 
Sousas' and Giltnore's 
Bands, Fatuous Songs 
and your own voice 



HOTEL RflMONfl 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



This style Graphophone 
Talking Machine 

$12.00 



Call and Hear it 427 South Broadway 




m 

American 
engraving 

Co mpany _ 

MADE MY PICTURE; 
DON'T YOU WANT 
THEM TO MAKE; 
YOURS? " 

"They make fine 
halftones, line cuts, 
embossing plates, 
newspaper cuts — 
just anything you 
want engraved. See 
them at the Times 
Building, 
Los Angeles." 



California 
Limited... 



Santa Fe 
Route 



The Fastest Regular Train E,ver Run Across the Continent 



HAVE YOU NOTICED THE SCHEDULE? 

Leaves Los Angeles 1.90 p.m. Mon. Wed. Sat. 
Arrives Denver - - 5 CO p.m. Wed. Fri. Mon. 
Arrives Kansas City - !) 10 p.m. Wed Fri. Mon. 
Arrives Chicago - - 9.68 a. m. Thnrs. Pat. Tues. 



CI IN XK TING TRAIN'S 



Arrives U::iaha - ■ 
Arrives St , 'lis - 
Arrives Fort W 'h ■ 
Arrives St Paul • 
Arrives New York 
Arrives Boston - - 



6.C0 a.m. Thnr. Sat. Tues. 
■ 7.00 a.m. Thur. Sat. Tues. 
s.oo a.m. Thur. Sat. Tues. 
7 00 p.m. Thur. Sat. Tues. 

I. 30 p.m. Fri. Sun. Wed. 

II. 00 p.m. Fri. Suu. Wed. 



The California Limited is made up of the highest class of equipment, is lighted by electricity 
and carries composite and observation cars with every accommodation for ladies and gentlemen. 
The Dining car gives unegualed service. 

This splendid tiain is for first-class travel only, but there is no extra or arge beyond the rcgu 
lar ticket and sleeping car rate an<' is in addition to the regular Dally Overland Kxpiess 
which cairies both I'ullnian Palace and tourist cars through to Chicago. 



H. K. GREGORY, Asst Gen'l Pavsenger Agt 
S. C. and S. Fe. P. roads, Los Angeles. 



JNO. J. BYRNE, Gen'] I assenger Agt. 
S. C and S. Fe P. roads, Los Angeles 



| Los Angeles 
- Pipe Organ Co. 



Bolide « <>f 

| Church 
4 ..Concert.. 

And 

| Parlor Pipe Organs 

* Factory: 

9 8th and San Pedro Sis. 
^ Los Angeles Tel. Oreen 




Chas. R. Conrad 'a. 
Henry Wilhelin 

Pneumatic Electro Pneumatic 
Action and Pueutnatic Couplers 
our Specialty. Organs 
rebuilt by the latest sys- 
tems. Special specifica- 
tions furnished on short 
notice. Organs taken care of 
by yearly contract. Piano 
and Organ tuning and 
repairi n g 



1633 



EASTERN STAR LAUNDRY 

We do Fine Work and do not wear out the ffi, QIH riPT C±L CTDCCT 
clothes. All we ask is a trial 0 ' ' tAu I 3111 0 I h LL I 

G. G. CEZAR, Proprietor 



Most Centrally Located. First-class at Modern Rate! 

Cor. Spring and Third Streets 

F. B. MALLORY, Prop. 



Our Wines fire unexcelled 

They are selected from the finest Sonoma Valley and Southern California 
Vintages. 

Our prices make them within the reach of every purse. A trial will 
convince you. 

Old Sonoma Claret 35c gal I Wines in bottles, the 50c kind, 

Old Sonoma Zinfandel, very fine 41c 0 -al I per bottle, 25c 

5-year-old Port 50c gal I Good Whisky in bulk $1.90 gal 

5 '' Sberry, Angelica & Mnscat, 65c gal I Quart Bottle of Fine Whisky 75c 

All other goods in proportion. 

We carry a full line of FINE LIQUEURS for Holiday Trade. 

Eastern shipments a specialty. 



397-399 S Los Angeles St. 



4 



Tel. M. 91 
No bar in con- 
nection 
Free Delivery 



JOSEPH MAIER 

President and Treas 

Home 
Industry 



GEORGJS zobelein 

Vice- Pres. and Sec y 

Keep Money 
at Home 



MAIER & 
ZOBELEIN | 

444 ALIS0 STREET 




TEL. 91 



Incorporated 
•f 

LOS ANGELES, CAL 



Rave You had Your (fluiter Suit ? 




ONE OF KELLflM'S 



J 0 ", $15.00 , " sl "' s ' 



Suits 

362 S. Broadway 



Corner 4th Street 



LOS ANGELES 

Assay 0TTIG6 and Mining Exchange 

C C. DEAN, MANAGER 

Assaying a Specialty Low Rates and Accuracy 
MINES EXAMINED AND SAMPLED 



149 NORTH MAIN St. 

Rdoiiis 3 and (i 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



Cos Angeles terminal Ry. 




THE 

TOURISTS' 



Mount Lowe 
Santa Cataliria Island 



FAVORITE to L()ng Beach 

San Pedro^fe*^*^* 



The Only Line passing through Long 
Beach with a picturesque six-mile ride 
along the Sea Shore going to Santa Cata- 
lina. Positively first-choice of Steamer ac- 
commodations. ' No delays. No transfers. 

To Mount Lowe Trains pass through beautiful Pas- 
adena and the San Gabriel Valley. No change 
of cars, an advantage not secured on other lines. 

Telephone M. 960 

Excursion Tickets on Sale Every Day 

CITY TICKET OFFICE, 214 SO. SPRING ST. 

S. B. IIVNKS, Gen. Agt. T. C. l'KCK, Gen. Agt. Fa«8. Dept 

gni igj sfajaHajagjgj gjsrgjsisjoMaj aiaraiaiaMaisi eiai3JSEiar^ffli3MaiafaHSMai3isjaisisisi 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VI. 
Number 3. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, January 21, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
10 Cents a Copy 



Western Graphic 



- pt>o ;» oi~nre> tmrou.iu > 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

ben. c. truman :-: :-: :-: editor 



THE report of the Director of the Mint 
sets forth that this country has reached 
a financial standing that challenges the ad- 
miration of the world and that is no less a 
marvel to foreign nations than it is to the 
people of the United States. To a student of 
political gospel it must appear that such won- 
derful financial achievements are to some ex- 
tent indebted to our recent military and naval 
exploits. This report shows that the avail- 
able gold of the country amounts, in round 
numbers, to $910,000,000, which is an increase 
of $284,000,000 since the day of the nomina- 
tion of Mr. McKinley in 1896. Yet, large as 
this sum appears, it looks still larger when 
compared to the stocks of gold held by the 
leading foreign nations. It is $215,000,000 
in excess of the holdings of Great Britain, 
$285,000,000 in excess of the stock held in 
Germany, and $60,000,000 more than is pos- 
sessed by France. This rapid increase in the 
quantity of gold may be almost wholly ac- 
counted for in the phenomenal growth of the 
trade balance in favor of this country, for 
since 1889 there has been no year in which 
the balance of foreign commercial transac- 
tions has not been on our side, and while the 
amount has varied considerably one year 
with another the total credit approximates 
$1,850,000,000. A very large proportion of 
this has been paid by bonds and other secur- 
ities in alien hands, but latterly we have 
drawn upon the stocks of foreign gold in the 
adjustment of trade balances and at the same 
time we have been able to retain the products 
of our own mines. It is an interesting ques- 
tion whether we can hold the position of being 
a creditor nation which has been so long held 
by Great Britain, but at present there is 
nothing to indicate an unfavorable change in 
our foreign trade relations. 

If there is any one thing more than 
another that will engender favorable feeling 
toward territorial expansion among the work- 
ing men of the United States it is its energetic 
opposition by Andrew Carnegie. There is no 
doubt but the foolish minister's "Rum-Roman- 
ism-and-Rebellion " alliterative boomerang 
defeated Mr. Blaine for President and that 
Father York's condemnation of Maguire drew 
votes from Governor Gage. But these and all 
like episodes are infinitesimal in their influ- 
ences compared to the effect anything favored 
by Mr. Carnegie will have on the workingmen 
of the country, who will never forget that said 
Carnegie is the monster who hired the Pink- 
ertons to shoot down scores of the bread win- 
ners of Pennsylvania in cold blood. So long 



as Andrew Carnegie maintains his attitude 
against "triumphant despotism," as he calls 
our new acquisitions, so long will there be an 
unbroken front in favor of said acquisitions. 
Verily, with Aguinaldo, Agoncillo and Carne- 
gie against him, the President need have no 
fear of the people, for they are at his back 
ten million strong. 

Apropos, since writing the above our atten- 
tention has been called to the fact that five 
years ago this same Andrew Carnegie, who is 
now so violently opposed to expansion, wrote 
a magazine article, entitled " A Look Ahead," 
advocating the union of England, Scotland, 
Wales, Ireland and Canada with the United 
States. In urging such a union he said: The 
American people are favorable to the exten- 
sion of national boundaries. No evil, but 
great good, has come from every succeeding 
addition to their union. Therefore a proposi- 
tion to reunite Great Britain and the republic 
would not seem anything novel to them. They 
are used to territorial expansion. We observe 
in the history of the world that patriotism is 
ever expansive. Centuries ago the people of 
Perugia and Assisi, fifteen miles apart, were 
deadly enemies. The patriotism of the Peru- 
gian and Assisian could not embrace an area 
so great as fifteen miles. Today patriotism 
stretches over hundreds of miles — in some 
cases thousands of mile3 — and does not lose, 
but gains, in intensity as it covers a wider area. 
There is more to be patriotic about." An- 
drew's changes may not be so lightning as 
Legislators Huber's and Wright's, but they are 
of much more importance and deeper mystery. 

It is to be regretted that such episodes as 
the Eagan tumult should be precipitated at a 
time when spectacular rejoicings of peace are 
rife. General Eagan was clearly in the wrong 
in every way, shape and manner, principally 
because the President had declared that all 
witnesses should be immune, and because such 
conduct it always prejudicial to the good of 
the military seivice. Further^ he had no right 
to refer to his superior officer in so insolent 
and outrageous a manner, no matter what the 
circumstances may have been. General Miles 
is not so popular as many of his predecessors 
have been, and they all had some thorns in 
their roseway. But he is as noted for bravery 
and success as any of them and must not be 
assailed by a subordinate without the bring- 
ing of the latter to account. It would look as 
if Adjutant General Corbin, Secretary of War 
A'.ger and Commissary General Eagan had 
conspired from the start to destroy Major Gen- 
eral Miles. So far as Charlie Eagan is con- 
concerned he has been for thirty years an 
irascible person and a turbulent stickler for 
punctilliousness of military rank and 
etiquette, and he has been in aseries of small- 
er troubles, growing out of his constitutional 
pompousness and hij.h temper ever since his 
entrance into the service. It has always been 
understood by his intimates that he carried a 
large slab on his shoulder at all times and 
that whoever knocked it off did not do so with 
impunity. 

As the waves of the sea wash away the 
prints in the sand, so has the late war filled 



the partly-closed chasm which had still, at 
least remotely, divided the North and the 
South. No power nor controversy can ever 
again put asunder the links which bind the 
sisterhood of States. Every tongue of fire 
that shot up from the war burned the bonds 
of unity into renewed power of endurance. 
Today' that sentiment of patriotism which 
springs from the hearts of true men in Maine 
sweeps with resistless iorce to the waters of the 
Rio Grande and Sacramento. Why, then, in 
the midst of so much fraternal feeling, should 
there be such an outbreak as has occurred be- 
fore the commission that is investigating the 
conduct of the war ? 

Old Simon Cameron of Pennsylvania was 
the first man who actually bought his way 
into the United States Senate by paying so 
much "apiece" to four legislators to vote for 
him. Col. John W. Forney, a great demo- 
cratic editor and political manager of the '50s, 
had carried Pennsylvania for James Buchanan 
in 1856, without which Fremont and not 
Buchanan would have been elected President. 
The legislature had a democratic majority and 
Forney was to have been made Senator. But 
Simon Cameron deliberately bought enough 
votes to rob Forney of the exalted position 
and secure the seat for himself. Forney appealed 
to Buchanan to remedy the matter as much 
as possible and to appoint him Postmaster 
General, which Buchanan would have liked 
to have done; but Floyd, Cobb, and other 
prominent Southerners prevented him, and so 
Forney estsblished the Philadelphia Press and 
fought Buchanan until he died, and long be- 
fore the attack on Fort Sumter Forney had 
become one of the leaders of the Union side, 
and had drawn such eminent democrats and 
oratosr as Dan Dougherty, Haskin, Thomas 
Francis Meagher, John A. Logan, McClern- 
and, and thousands of others along with 
him. Succeeding Simon Cameron was J. Don- 
ald Cameron, his son, better known as " Don 
Cameron," who for many years was as much 
of a power in Pennsylvania politics as Mat- 
thew Quay has heen since. Only a few years 
before the coming to the front of multi-mil- 
lionaires like Vanderbilt, Gould, Huntington, 
Rockefeller and others, Don Cameron's appear- 
ance in New York attracted a great number of 
public men and politicians of all grades. But 
after a while his coming and going seemed to 
excite very little attention or comment and 
his callers were not numerous. As a political 
curiosity he seem to have dropped out of sight 
and men looked upon him almost as they did 
Mr. Conkling as being no longer a powerful 
factor in the politics of the country. The 
Pennsylvanians, of ourse, took off their hats 
as he passed by and went to see him as a mat- 
ter of courtesey, but even they at last no lon- 
ger bowed to bis will as they used to or 
waited upon his coming and going as a 
matter of serious moment to them. It was 
easy to attribute very much of this to his long 
sickness, during which the sympathy of hia 
constituents and friends kept them from dis- 
turbing his retirement, but the truth is that 
none of the old Repuhlican leaders attracted 
the attention that they used to. People seemed 
surfeited with politics, and the great leaders 
of corporation interests became more sought 
after and appeared to be greater curiosities 
than any of the politicians. The leading 
Democratic magnates hegan to create far more 
ripple than the Republicans. It was an ex- 
emplification of the old adage: "The swine 
follows the fellow who carries the meal-bag." 



Western Graphic 



Ulitb Our Boys at JVIamla 

ClJARTEL DK MEISIC, 

Manila, P. I., Dec. 4, '98. 
THE PHILIPPINE QUESTION 

HOW TI1K LEADING JOURNALS VIEW THE SITUA- 
TION 

RECENTLY there have appeared in the 
two leading Filipino papers articles 
which have attracted considerable attention. 
Many assertions made in the contributions 
attached hereto are wild and can be gainsaid. 

The following is a literal translation from 
"La Independencia " (The Independent) as 
published in the Manila Times. 

Before the announcement of the probable 
result of the Paris conference as regards the 
Philippines the Filipino commissioner in said 
capital clearly denned the attitude of the 
Filipinos in decisive and final words. The 
Filipinos will not allow their homes and their 
hearths to be bought and sold like merchan- 
dise. They will be ready to fight to the end 
in defense of their rights. 

We have said this more than once, and 
although it has been taken as arrogance on 
the part of a people only just born, we have 
repeated that the Filipinos will put up with 
nothing less than their independence. This 
is the program of the country; in this the 
government and the people are unanimous. 
The determination also does not make for 
peace but it does for right. 

Oh! we are the first to desire peace. Let 
it come. Let it come quickly. Let there be 
no more disturbances in this land; we insist, 
no more blood spilling, we have had much. 
In battle many good men fall. 

But it is necessary that our rights should 
be respected. In defense of these rights we 
have fought against Spain; in defense of them 
we will tight again, if we are provoked to it. 
Never, never will we be af^id on account of 
our weakness and want of help. We only 
fight for our rights, not from arrogance, nor 
pelf. We seek independence because we hate 
slavery; because we have suffered, and we 
well know how to sacrifice our lives for our 
ideal. 

Our rights are incontestible. Spain has 
been conquered by us in all the territory 
which we now govern; Luzon and part of 
Visayas and Mindanas are ours by right of 
conquest, gained by our arms. Factors more 
or less providential have intervened in our 
triumph. America has helped us indirectly 
by the blockade of Manila, and has precipi- 
tated our triumph; but without America's 
help the revolution would have gone on, and 
sooner or later we should have conquered by 
ourselves. 

Spain'B domination ceased here from the 
moment in which the spirit of the country 
rose against her. Our independence was as 
sured, as our delegate Agoncillo well said in 
another of his declarations before the war 
broke out between Spain and the United 
States. 

Today the provinces which are still Span- 
ish in name form a part of our national unit}' 
because of the aspirations and their tendency 
towards us. From day to day we have as- 
surances that we will embrace all these our 
brothers, enjoying liberty after tyranny. 
Spain only holds dominion over the rest of 
the archipelago through fear and terror. Her 
sovereignity begins to be questionable; it is 
founded on force alone. There the govern- 
ment and the people do not form one body; 
they are completely separated. 

And Spain would dispose of all this archi- 
pelago! How can she cede anything that 
already does not belong to her? What right 
has she to? Nor can America make hers that 
which she has not received from Spain. What 
laws of right, either human or divine, could 
approve such a sale? Apart from the fact 



that the buying and selling of countries by 
international arrangement is one of the 
theories condemned to disappear because it is 
against modern ideas, people should not be 
sold like horses and houses. If the slave 
trade was abolished because it meant selling 
people, why conserve the selling of countries 
whose people have the right to object to be- 
coming a part of another nation. Strange 
contradiction of science. 

No; we will never cease to protest against 
such an absurd sale of our territory. The 
Filipinos have their program and they will 
carry it our whatever happens. They oppose 
being treated as merchandise. 



to immolate us are the same which give us the 
right to live free and independent as any other 
people who have attained their virility. 

America, the nation which brought to the 
Philippines from Hong Kong our great chief 
Aguinaldo, recognized our nationality; it al- 
lowed our ilag to float on the seas, and to be 
erected in the town around the bay, and on 
Corregidor, which made the very German na- 
tion respect it. This victorious Hag has sailed 
out of and into the bay in full sight of all the 
nations of Europe and Asia who had their 
fleets in our great bay, and none dared inter- 
fere with it. 

These acts show that our nationality was 




PLAZA AT MANILA— INSULAR BUI LDINlj, HOTEL de ORIENT AND TOBACCO FACTORY 
Tbc Hotel de Orient is the largest hotel in Manila. The Insular Building whs the domicile of the Light Battery; a company of 
Engineeis is quartered there now. This picture was specially taken for the Westers Graphic by its reguliir correspondent, whose 
1 i.st interesting letter appears herewith. 



Washington said: " What matters it to us 
the paying of a few pounds, more or less, for 
each pound of tea? We only discuss our 
rights." 

We say in the same way: " What matters 
it to us venturing into war, the end of which 
we cannot foresee? We fight only for rights." 



THE MOMENT II AS ARRIVED. 

Such is the heading of an article that ap- 
peared in "La Republica Filipina" (The 
Philippine Republic), a native organ pub- 
lished in Manila. The translation was made 
for the Manila Times which is quoted below. 

Spain has ceded to America a sovereignity 
over the Filipinos which she did not possess. 
At the moment that the Paris conference ter- 
minated its labors the Filipinos had already 
conquered the island of Luzon, the islands of 
Batanes and Babuyanes, Mindoro, Masbate, 
Marinduke, Romblon, Tikaw, Tablas, Burias, 
Sibuyan, Katanduanes, in a word all the 
islands adjacent to Luzon; Negros, Bohol, 
(iuimaras, all Panav, barring the town of 
Iloilo, Cebu, all but the town itself, Burias, 
Leyte, all but the town, Los Calamiones, Los 
Cuyas, Samar, all but the chief town, and 
nearly all the great island of Mindanao. 

This the false Spanish politicians and their 
government, not content with selling their 
religious communities and perpetrating atroci- 
ties and inhuman cruelties and innumerable 
assassinations now wish to treat as merchan- 
dise all the inhabitants of the archipelago, so 
as to give the appearance of legality to the 
infamous sale of territory over which they 
have lost their dominion. 

Nfver will the Philippine people consent 
to such ignominy. They have shed their blood 
in torrents and will shed it again before they 
will bow to the dominion of foreigners, for 
however light, such dominion would be none 
the less odious. These international laws 
which are so often quoted as giving the right 



publicly recognized, and if they do not today 
hold to that and acknowledge in writing and 
openly to the world our independence they 
will commit one of the greatest injustices. 

America, which always blazoned forth her 
greatness and which said she went to war with 
Spain for the sacred cause of humanity and 
to free the oppressed, and whose laws prohib- 
ited the expansion of territory beyond Amer- 
ican soil, we do not believe will be capable 
now of soiling her glorious records for gain 
or self interest and of getting down to the 
level of that nation which we have so much 
reason to despise. We repeat that we cannot 
believe that America, after the sympathy she 
has shown our cause and instead of showing 
a wish till now to dominate us has on the 
other hand protected our loyal aspirations, 
will now go againit our just and elevated 
deals. 

The opportune moment has therefore ar- 
rived for America, knowing, as she does, the 
Philippinos, their aims, their aspirations, and 
their rights, to continue the same line of con- 
duct that has characterized them hitherto. As 
they know our desires it is only right that 
they should tell us plainly what they expect 
to do with us. 

Had Spain asked $40,000,000 for the Phil- 
ippines, we would give twice the amount and 
more t" keep our rights thus ruthlessly set 
aside without our consent by two nations — one 
our enemy, and the other having no true 
understanding of our sacrifices, aspirations 
and rights. Unlike Spain, which lives in the 
memory of past glory alone, America loves 
her past, her present and her future; we do 
not believe her willing to allow a shadow to 
fall on her bright name, or capable of tramp 
ling on a people because of their weakness 
She will help them because of their noble de- 
sire for liberty. 

The Philippinos wish peace that they may 
develop the arts of peace; we do not wish to 
become a warlike nation. We went to war in 



Western Graphic 



5 



defense of the rights which Spain had violated; 
we wish for peace as soon as that object shall 
have been attained. With peace we hope to 
soon put ourselves on a level with the most 
advanced nations of the world, for our coun- 
try has riches and our people have the intel- 
ligence to carry us to the goal of our sacred 
aspirations. 

We know our people; they will not permit 
domination of the country by anyone, and we 
are certain that they will go to battle and to 
death singing in defense of their integrity. 
Already more than once have they shown it 
by putiing their undefended breasts in front 
of the Spanish Mausers and Remingtons. 
With seven rifles, a few hundred "bolas" 
and another few hundred pointed bamboos 
they conquered their old oppressors. Our in- 
nocent brothers who were a-sassinated in the 
name of Spain went to their death joyfully, 
knowing that they were shedding their blood 
for the redemption of their country. 

Of the class of men who know how to 
stand torture and death there are still a suffi- 
cient number left to fight, suffer and defend 
their country from a new slavery. 

We do not say this as a threat to America, 
but as a response to the jeers of those wicked 
Spaniards who belittle our pretentions and try 
to stir up strife between us and the Americans. 
They know that if they can do that the Amer- 
icans must use the power of their cannons to 
subdue us. 

But they make a mistake' It will not be 
the Philippinos who will break the harmony 
and friendship with America, so nobly offered 
us by them. 

They may rest assured that we can nobly 
await results, and that the first shot will 
never be fired by our army. Peace will not be 
interrupted except by the priests and perverse 
Spaniards, seconded by traitorous Philippinos 
who ma}' convince the army of occupation 
that the time has arrived to attack us. 

We believe in the ingenuousness of our 
ally, America, and we hope to have yet strong- 
er bonds of friendship with her. 

It will be observed that great stress is laid 
on the unanimity between the Insurgent Gov 
ernment and the people. They fail to men- 
tion the " Visayan Republic" in the south 
and the " Guardia de Honore '' in the north, 
who do not recognize the " Figure Head Agui- 
naldo " as their chieftain. The statement that 
the Philippinos will accept nothing short of in- 
dependence is false. There are many influen- 
tial natives who are not at all in favor of 
absolute independence. I have made a can- 
vass of a considerable number to ascertain 
their wishes and have found but one that 
could not be convinced that our government 
would be better for them than independence. 
Many favor a protectorate, while a large num- 
ber are in favor of independence, but are quite 
willing to accept American sovereignty. 

The emphatic declaration that they will 
not be sold as merchandise seems unnecessary 
for at this date a monetary consideration 
is but a surmise. Their vauntings that they 
will fight to the di>ath is perhaps one way 
they have of making a good bargain, and in 
the end they must accept the inevitable. 

Their clain that liberty was assured before 
the Spanish-American war was precipitated 
and that the blockade of Manila only indirect- 
ly abetted their cause, would lead us to con- 
clude that the campaign was already won by 
them with little to our credit. Yet, but for 
the blockade the contest could have been 
waged indefinitely. What impudence this. 
At the time when the Spanish-American war 
broke out, Aguinaldo and his brother patriots 
(?) were abroad dividing the plunder that 
was paid them in lieu of the liberty of their 
countrymen. Aguinaldo was sued in Hong 
Kong by his chiefs, and it is said that a good 



share of the money is still in the bank pend- 
ing legal adjudication. 

Great stress is alt=o laid on their aims and 
aspirations, and most worthy they are, but 
when their leaders will grovel in the dirt as 
they have done for self interest, it is far bet- 
ter they gather under our protecting wing. 

The only ones who tend to prvoke hostili- 
ties are the priests, Spanish sympathizers and 
treacherous Philippinos. There is an organiza- 
tion known as the Maccabbees who are at once 
hostile to the Spanish, Americans and Philip- 
pinos; they might be compared to our western 
cattle rustlers, caring for no law and living 
by theft. 

Recently a member of their gang was shot 
by an American (Corporal of the Guard), 
while attempting escape, having been caught 
in the act of robbery. They have sworn to 
retaliate and a member of the 1st California 
Infantry has been stabbed to death, the per- 
petrator escaping. Otherwise every one is 
pursuing the even tenor of his way. 

Respectfully, George J. Oden, 

Battery "H," 3rd Artillery. 

TRUSTS ARE LEADING TO SOCIALISM 

ACCORDING TO PAUL DE ROUSIERS 

THE eminent French statistician and poli- 
tical economist, Paul de Rousiers, has 
published a book on trusts in the United 
States which will prove most interesting read- 
ing, coming from such high authority on econ- 
omics. De Rousiers calls attention, of course, 
to the immense department stores, that kill 
small tradesmen, destroy competition and re- 
duce to the condition of mere employees the 
men who might have risen to be independent 
merchants; to the gigantic stockyards 
and packing houses; to the big flour monopoly; 
to the coal oil, sugar, whiskey, cordage, coal, 
steel and the many other combinations. 

In his anti-trust arguments he quotes the 
late General Francis A. Walker as telling 
him that trusts crush down competition and 
the inventive power of the people. 

"They constitute," said Walker, "a real 
tyranny and America must overthrow them 
as she has overthrown other tyrannies. How 
this will be accomplished I know not, but I 
have confidence in the enormous power of 
public opinion here." 

These accusations, says the author, are all 
made from the economic side. There is still 
another, very general, fully verified by a num- 
ber of instances, and against which the trusts 
themselves can only feebly defend themselves, 
to be made on the political side. Absolute 
corruption, indeed, has seldom soiled the 
courts of justice, but it has continually in- 
vaded the legislative halls, especially of the 
states, and the municipalities of the larger 
cities. Thus trusts have frequently controlled 
or blocked legislation; they have held officials 
of all sorts in their grasp. Hence the eco- 
nomic problem they raise is complicated by a 
political problem. With the masses of the 
population trusts are intensely unpopular. 

Concentration, he tells us, is a general but 
absolutely normal phenomenon of the system. 
Monopoly is an exception that owes most to 
artifice. Even in the case of the Standard 
Oil, where natural causes have helped to estab- 
lish a monopoly of petroleum, he finds what 
he calls artifice in the fact of the complicity 
of railway companies and of public officials. 
But the chief artificial cause for the worst 
phase of the trust system he finds in the 

American tariff. 

***** 



If it be true, he argues, that industrial 
evolution leads to monopoly, it is likewise 
clear that it leads to socialism. When all in- 
dustries have undergone the transformation 
which is declared to be necessary and inevita- 
ble, when each has but a single head, when 
competition has disappeared, it will follow logi- 
cally and fatally that they must be nation- 
alized. 

American socialists have been quick to see 
and to announce this eventual culmination. 
M. de Rousiers quotes from Daniel De Leon's 
book, " The Socialist View of the Trust," this 
passage in point: — "The ladder upon which 
humanity has mounted toward civilization is 
the progress in the methods of labor, the ever 
more powerful tool of production. The trust 
occupies the top of the ladder. Around it 
rages the modern social tempest. The capital- 
istic class seeks to conserve it for its own ex- 
clusive use. The middle class seeks to des- 
troy it, thus retarding the march of civiliza- 
tion. The socialists seek3 to preserve it, to 
perfect it and open it to all. 

Thus the avaricious capitalist class may 
be caught, in its own net. In sustaining 
through personal interest that the trusts, with 
all their abuses, are in the line of progress it 
furnishes to socialism a most potent argu- 
ment. 

***** 
What is the remedy? It is not, says M. 
de Rousiers, to be found in restrictive legisla- 
tion. Over and over again the courts of the 
United States have proclaimed the failure of 
the anti trust laws, which attack trusts by a 
series of essentially artificial measures — by 
forbidding two rival companies to combine by 
mutual consent, by forbidding different rail- 
way companies to come to an understanding 
about rates, etc. These do not go to the root 
of the evil, for they augment the number of 
artificial conditions in lieu of diminishing 
them; they complicate what should be simpli- 
fied. 

Trusts in the public service will disappear 
completely, says the author, on the day when 
the American authorities succeed in regaining 
their normal control over the interests which 
they have in charge. 

Trusts in private industries will be re- 
duced to one or two exceptions on the day 
when the American authorities shall decide 
not to interfere with artificial restraints, nota- 
bly by protective tariffs, on the economic field. 

" It will then be plainly seen in the United 
States, as now in England, that industrial 
concentration is not a menace to competi- 
tion." 

If a woman is patriotic she never deserts 
her colors. 

If lies had only legs they wouldn't be able 
to travel quite so fast. 

If love made the world go round there 
would be fewer revolutions. 

If a man is given his daily bread he kicks 
because it isn't buttered. 

If some men fail to get their just deserts 
they have cause for rejoicing. 

If a girl proposes marriage to a man she 
merely tries to make a name for herself. 

If a man is as honest as the day is long it 
is sometimes well to turn the searchlight on 
his night record. 

Mr. Watts, R. A., who is over eighty, is go- 
ing to devote himself to sculpture for a time, 
the subject to be a life-size statue of the late 
poet laureate, Lord Tennyson. 

Paul Villars, the correspondent in Lon- 
don of the Paris Figaro, has received the order 
of the Legion d'Honneur. 



6 

Hown T^alh and prattle 

CAPTAIN JAMES B. LANKERSHIM has 
rounded up a series of extensive travels 
which have heretofore included tours of China, 
Japan, Hawaii, Mexico, the West Indies and 
Alaska, with a tour of Europe, Egypt, Turkey 
and Greece; and he possesses the happy fac- 
ulty of depicting what he has seen in a thor- 
oughly enlivening way. The writer is in- 
debted to the Captain for an hour's pleasure, 
in which the facile rover presented an exceed- 
ingly lively picture of Cairo, old and new — 
for there are too Cairos, the old Cairo of forty 
centuries, and the new Cairo with its clean 
streets, elegant hotels, pretentious thops and 
inviting cafes, the new and the old Cairo be- 
ing divided just as Canal street in New Or- 
leans divides the American from the French 
town. The new Cairo has much that suggests 
Paris, much French being spoken and much 
more that savors of the blandishments of the 
French capital. A good deal of the weather 
of Cairo reminded the Captain of Los Ange- 
les, although there are tremendous winds fre- 
quently, that originate in the Mediterranean 
and that are bitter and cold. These winds 
are so strong that they will carry craft up the 
Nile four miles an hour, while the same ves- 
sels come down the river with the current 
when the winds are not blowing. The Captain 
saw the big Pyramids and the Sphinx, that 
remarkable object that looks forever across 
the desert and never condescends to speak. 
He says there are many pyramids and ruins 
of temples and many other panoramas of long 
buried nations and much else to challenge the 
attention of the beholder, and that discoveries 
of pyramids are constantly being made, the 
latest being six pyramids on the northern 
side of Gebel Barkal mountain. 

Constantinople did not fascinate Captain 
Lankershim on account of the filthine^s and 
meanness of its people. It is very palpable 
that our nomadic Angeleno is not gone on the 
unspeakable Turk, nor is he daft over the 
Greek, who is black, swarthy and nasty. 
Athens has its pretty touches, however, and 
its ruins are forlorn and beautiful. Captain 
Lankershim has in his house several paint- 
ings, some statuary and several lesser objects 
from all the lands he has visited during the 
past ten years, and he brought his sister, Mrs. 
Van Nuys, a set of silver spoons from Pompeii 
that had been buried in Vesuvius' ashes 
nearly two thousand years ago. 

" I wonder why it is," he said slowly, as 
he pushed back his plate, and, holding his 
wine glass by its slender stem, looked into it 
with the air of a connoisseur, " that women 
will do so many foolish things and sacrifice so 
much to have their gowns lined with silk. 
Why, I heard a woman say not long ago that 
if it were between a gingham lined with silk 
and a magnificent satin lined with cotton or 
other ordinary fabric, that she would take the 
former every time. Generally speaking, grades 
of people may be got at by the street cars 
they ride in — thus: The University comes 
first, then the Grand avenue and Traction, 
then the Main street, Pico, Ninth and Wash- 
ington, and then the Downey avenue, Maple 
and Boyle Heights. But women with silk- 
lined gowns ride in all of these cars, from the 
wealthy widow of the Harper tract to the 



Western Graphic 

People's store maiden of the First ward. Of 
course there are women— strange to say — who 
have foregone this unnecessary lining, believ- 
ing they would reach St. Peter's in dresses 
lined in the good old way. When the petti- 
coat is of stiff silk each movement, no matter 
how sligh t , makes that rustling noise that is 
like the sweetest music to the average femi- 
nine ear. Yet she will take great pains to 
shake her skirts when she sits down or changes 
her position till a theatrical thunderstorm is 
suggested." Then my fi iend, satisfied that he 
was correct in his diagnosis, resumed his sip- 
ping. But he was dead right. Why, there are 
scores of women — and not all noveau riche, 
either, — who bestow their friendships accord- 
ing to the weight and rustle of the silk lin- 
ings in the frocks of their acquaintances. Six 
beautifully dressed women got into a Univer- 
sity car on Monday last; — some pretty, others 
ordinary, and two sufficiently ugly to attract 
attention; yet the heavily embroidered dame, 
with oriental plaster and belladona, near the 
door, hardly vouchsafed the half dozen a 
glance because their linings were of only a 
slightly rustling kind, such as cheap silk and 
only a little way up barely, make. But pres- 
ently a stately brunette entered the car with a 
tremendous swish and magic betrayal of bro- 
cade of the stand-alone variety, and all eyes 
were turned toward the haughty creature, and 
the painted female who had only glanced 
coldly towards the six more modestly attired 
ones nearly twisted herself off her seat in her 
paroxysms of approbation and delight. "O 
Frailty, thy name is woman " — at least so said 
Shakespeare. 

One of the best things done by the last rain 
storm was the knocking down of the repelling 
two-story bill boards that disfigure our fair 
city from one end to the other and that are a 
shame to the authorities that permit them. 
To be sure, there are owners of vacant lots 
who get back tax money for permitting the 
ugly excresences on their premises, a business 
method that is not to be sneezed at; but do 
not these advertising boards injure the sale of 
their own and adjoining lots? — for no person 
would purchase a piece of land for the pur- 
pose of building with one of these gigantic 
objects with all manner of startling announce- 
ments, chiefly patent medicines or more in- 
decent characters and hieroglyphics, near by. 
The Council ought at least draw the line at 
immodest advertisements, such as may be 
seen on many of these repelling broadsides. 
A number of eastern cities have taken this 
bill board advertising in hand and the system 
has been knocked out in many places. Chi- 
cago is now wrestling with the matter, with 
Mayor Harrison in the lead, but as it has 
been proven that two or three of its aldermen 
are beneficiaries of the sign men, the wiping 
out of the blotches may be a tough job. 

Johnny Gaffey says the San Pedro cele- 
bration will be the most enthusiastic and 
numerously attended fiesta that has ever been 
known in California, and that among the in- 
vited ones are President McKinley, Admiral 
Walker, and others. " We shall also send an 
invitation to Secretary Alger," said Gaffey, 
''and if he comes we will kill the fattest calf 
we can find for his express use. With Hob- 
son safe away from the giddy girls who were 
smacking him into an unenviable notoriety; 
with the American flag floating from Morro 
Castle, and Aguinaldo being given the marble 
heart, and McKinley and Alger at my prodig- 



ious barbecue, the results of the past months 
form an annus mirabilis whose like the world 
will probably not soon see again." Whenever 
Gaffey runs up against Otheman Stevens he 
comes away with his Santa Clara Latin 
brushed up — therefore annus mirabilis. 

Ex Councilman Hltchins is ready to go 
on the stand and swear that the Democratic 
party supplied him with a large quantity of 
embalmed politics. 

We have heretofore congratulated J. S. 
Slauson and the Chamber of Commerce on 
the elevation of Mr. Slauson lu the presidency 
of that important and influential association, 
and now we take great pleasure in congratu- 
lating Robert Lee Craig upon his being se- 
lected as president of the Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Association. Surely it was 
putting the right man in the right place. 
Mr. Craig has been connected with the whole- 
sale business since he came here a few years 
ago. He was born in Wisconsin in 1860. In 
1862 his parents came to Watsonville, Santa 
Cruz county, where Mr. Craig's school days 
and youth were spent. He entered the whole- 
sale grocery business when eighteen years of 
age, most of the time in San Francisco, until 
his removal to Los Angeles, where he entered 
into partnership with R. H. Howe, and later 
became partner in the firm of Craig, Stuart & 
Co., of which he has been president for a num- 
ber of years. The other officers elected were: 
C. C. Reynolds, first vice president; George 
Arnott, second vice president; J. M. Schneider, 
treasurer, and F. J. Zeehandelaar was unani- 
mously elected secretary. A finance com- 
mittee, composed of Frank Simpson, R. E. 
Marx and J. W. Lynch, was elected. 

In reply to " Subscriber," who asks the 
editor of GRAPHIC what are the best means of 
disguising the breath after going to see a man 
between spells at the Orpheum, or after in- 
dulging in alcoholic stimulants, he is com- 
pelled to say he does not know, positively. 
But he has heard that cloves will remove sus- 
picions of a single high ball or a lone Man- 
hattan; that cardamon seeds are sufficient to 
give the proper Keeley Institute exhalation to 
a plain snifter with no water on the side, and 
that trix or cachows are necessary to remove 
the Kentucky odor from a sturdy rum and 
gum between each act. But none of these 
disinfectants is so thorough in its efficacy as 
a raw onion masticated wiih deliberation. 
Sometimes half an onion, if said esculent be 
a good sized one, or even a smaller fraction > 
will secure one from all suspicion of having 
taken alcohol into his system by putting the 
olfactories of others upon another and entirely 
different scent. But why go out of theaters 
between acts and make half a dozen or more 
well behaved people uncomfortable and tell to 
everyone who sees you that you can't get 
along a few hours without a drink? Say, 
" Subscriber," abjure the theater tod, and save 
the cost of onions. 

Otheman Stevens' telegraphic letters tothe 
Herald are among the best in the State, con- 
sidering them from the standpoint of general 
excellence. They are graphic and newsy, re- 
spectable and instructive. They deal in fact 
and purpose and are not too long drawn out. 
Mr. Stevens has a happy method of some- 
times getting in harness with his imagination 
as is necessary for all bread winners in his 
line to do, but he never deals solar-plexus 



Western Graphic 



blows nor goes rainbow chasing in the dark. 
He is a raconteur of conspicuous effulgence 
and is an adept in sometimes exhibiting the 
weaker points of a good fellow without mak- 
ing him ridiculous beyond the point of real 
genuine off-hand pleasantry. Stevens is one 
of the wits and gastronomes of the Sun- 
set Club, and when he is not present at that 
monthly dinner there are all sorts of voids at 
the goat end of the board and Colonel Mosher 
loses his appetite for bird and bottle and 
declares that frijoles are good enough for him. 

Colonel Peter Martin, who is a great 
favorite with club men and society people 
generally, is again in our city for a few days. 




Col. A. B. Hotchkiss and wife have just 
returned from a visit to Sacramento, where 
they attended the inaugural ball. Mrs. Hotch- 
kiss looked radiant on that occasion in an 
imported gown of gas-light green covered with 
black chiffon, bodice decked with spangles and 
rare lace. 



It would look as if one of our Senatorial 
candidates had been singularly unfortunate 
in his selection of political and financial man- 
agers — in other words the man Green has been 
appropriately named and the man Wright 
not well named, as he is not all right at all. To 
put it mildly Green and Wright may be said 
to be a brace of chumps. The present Sena- 
torial aspect presents an almost unmistakable 
chance for either Barnes or Bulla, with the 
latter in the lead, and who would make the 
proper and reasonable successor of another 
strictly pure and upright Senator — Hon. 
Stephen M. White. This paper is for Bulla, 
first; and, afterward, Grant of San Diego or 
Bard of Ventura. It was a long time after 
Simon Cameron bought votes outright for a 
seat in the United States Senate that another 
dared the same act. The next was Eugene 
Casserly of California in 1868. Then Sharon 
and Fair of Nevada, some ten years later, 
bought tbeir way into the august body by 



purchasing legislators outright. And subse- 
quently Leland Stanford of California did the 
same. Accusations have been made in the 
cases of others, but I do not know that the 
acts have been so perfectly traced as in con- 
nection with those mentioned. 

The dedication by Pomona College of the 
Pearsons Hall of Science will take place today 
(Saturday), January 21, and the exercises of 
dedication will begin at 10 a. m. The pro- 
gram is adapted to attract all friends of the 
college, and especially all teachers in Southern 
California. President David Starr Jordan of 
Stanford University will be present. An Ad- 
dress upon "Natural Science as a Factor in 



Education " will be delivered by Professor 
Thomas R. Bacon of the University of Cali- 
fornia, and Professor Walter Miller of Stan- 
ford University will speak upon " The Old 
and the New." The most representative edu- 
cators in Southern California have been in- 
vited, and some of them will have a part in 
the exercises of the day. There are a number 
of trains each way by Southern Pacific and 
Santa Fe. 

SOLID BUSINESS MEN OF LOS ANGELES BAN- 
QUET 

THE Westminster Hotel was in a brilliant 
state Thursday evening, the occasion being 
the banquet of the members of the Merchants 
and Manufacturers' Association of Los Ange- 
les. The hotel — and especially the banquet 
room — was tastefully decorated and delicious 
music was rendered by J. Fred Schmeisi's or- 
chestra, and ferns, interspersed with various 
colored carnations, were spread along the cen- 
ter of the table, which was arranged in the 
form of a U. Bouquets were set at intervals 
around the table and were alternately ar- 
ranged with bunches of long-stemmed clay 
pipes, joined with bows of red, white and blue 
ribbon. On the pipes were tied cards bearing 
various mottoes. 



Fred L. Baker, retiring president of the 
Merchants and Manufacturers' Association, 
sat at the head of the table. On his left were 
Gen. John R. Mathews, J. S. Slauson, presi- 
dent of the Chamber of Commerce; W. C. 
Patterson, H. J. Fleishman and R. S. Craig. 
On his right were Toastmaster Charles R. 
Boothe, A. Scarboro, president of the Manu 
facturers and Producers' Association of Cali- 
fornia, of San Francisco; Mayor Fred Faton, 
R. W. Burnham, C. C. Wright and Harry 
Chandler. 

After the repast there was the usual feast 
of reason and flow of soul, during which 
Postmaster Mathews responded to the toast of 
"The President of the United States;" Hon. 




W. C. Patterson to " The State of California;" 
Mayor Eaton to "The City of Los Angeles;" 
Hon. C. C. Wright to " Our Commercial Inter- 
ests;" R. W. Burnham to "Southern Cali- 
fornia;" H. C. Frank to " Modern Business 
Methods," and H. J. Fleischman to "The 
Merchants and Manufacturers' Association, 
Wholesalers as Well as Retailers." And then 
there were other than set speeches until the 
close which took place at about midnight. 
The following gentlemen were present: 

Fred L Baker, C B Boothe, J S Slauson. W C 
Patterson, Hon John R Mathews, Hon Fred lOaton, 
C C Wright, R W Burnham. H W Frank, H J Fleish- 
man, Harry Chandler, A Scarboro, G J Grilllth, 
George Arnott. N BonKlio, K L Craig, R D Scriver, 
E C Haskell, Byron Erkenbrecher, W E Keller, B 
Kingsbaker, J W Lynch, CC Reynolds, J M Schnei- 
der, Frank Simpson, Arthur B Thomas, A Loeb, C C 
Desmond, A Fusenot, M M Potter, Jacob Baruch, 
Karl Triest. M J Newmark, Charles Udell, M W 
Stewart, G W Hack, L Kimble, P E Bosbyshell, I A 
Lothian, G T (Jay, Morris Cohn, S M Newmark, Lee 
Chamberlain, W G Hunt, F W King, M A Newmark, 
S G Marsbutz. A C Jones, S Polaski, W C Bluett, 
Simon Maier, Max Meyberg, J J Bergin, K A Stuart, 
K II Berron, Niles Pease, Sherman Pease, L Winter, 
Thomas F Barnes. M C Adler, Alfred Stern, H P An- 
derson, John Chanslor. Sanford Newbauer, J W 
Warren, W ,H Burns. Henry Glass, F J Zeohando- 
laar. L A Craig, F W Brand, H Jacoby, A L Brown, 
E B Loventhal, C F A Last, Frank Wiggins, WS 
Porter, J Sehodor. Samuol Stein. A M Davidson, M 
F McLaurin, J Loew, L Baruch, A C Bilicke. S C 
Harry, Joseph Maier. James W Bellman, H F Voll- 
mer. J T Fitzgerald, Otto Sweet, George Rice, Ernest 
H Bresee, T Frank McGrath, John H Keefer, Har- 
rington Brown, Edward Chambers, P W Bresee, F O 
Johnson, Reese, Llewellyn. 




8 

Book Chat and Reviews 

L. BKHYMER. 
God is i>s author and not man, He laid 
The keynote of all harmonies.— Brainard. 
Earth with its thousand voices praises (iod.— Coleridge. 
The safety of n nation is not its armies, not its treasures 
tmt its friends.— Sallukst. 

It is chiefly through I oofcs that we enjoy intercourse with 
superior minds.— Channinu. 

He loved the twilight that surrounds 

The borderland of old romance.— Longfellow. 

AS WE glance over the numerous criti- 
cisms and reviews of the new books we 
are startled at the enormous number which is 
every month placed before the public in dif- 
ferent forms, shapes and binding?. As we 
step into our large book establishments in this 
city and see the vast number of attractively 
bound volumes grouped on shelves and coun- 
ters we wonder where they all came from. 
These features of the book business remind 
us once more of the great expansion that a 
few years have seen in the literary interests of 
the American people. It is a constant source 
of wonder that a public exists large enough 
and eager enough to absorb the large literary 
output of each year. But we seldom give 
sufficient importance to the taste and appetite 
for reading which the spread of education has 
created in this country since the war. It is 
unquestionably true that a thousand books 
are now sold where only a few hundred were 
sold a generation ago. Nothing shows this 
any better than the enormous sales for Kip- 
ling's writings, or for Crawford's, when we 
compare them with the limited sales which 
the writings of Hawthorne had, or the writ- 
ings of the New England poets. The fact is 
seen again in the support given to literary 
papers and magazines— periodicals any of 
which would have struggled hard for life in 
the late sixties. 

After analyzing all remarks made by book 
sellers we are led to believe that the best read 
books this moment, books most discussed in 
social chit chat, include, " Ave Roma Immor- 
talis," by F. Marion Crawford, "The Day's 
Work," by Rudyard Kipling, "Red Rock," 
by Thomas Nelson Page, " The Adventures of 
Francois," by S. Weir Mitchell, "The Battle 
of the Strong," by Gilbert Parker, " Roden's 
Corner," by H. S. Merriman, "The Castle 
Inn,'' by Stanley Weyman, "The Red Axe," 
by S. R. Crockett, " Cyrano de Bergerac " by 
Rostand, "The Gadby," by Voynich, "After- 
wards," by Ian Maclaren, " A Yankee Volun- 
teer," by Taylor, "The Great Salt Lake 
Trail," by Inman, " Rupert of Hentzau," by 
Hope, and " A Gunner Aboard the Yankee." 

One peculiar revival of the books of the 
past decade is the great demand for Francis 
Parkman's " Oregon Trail." I find the entire 
number of local dealers sold out and each one 
with several orders for it in different bindings 
awaiting new stock. 

Seven editions in four weeks is a striking 
testimony to the popularity of the clever 
writer, Mr. G. W. Steven's work "With 
Kitchener in Khartum," Decidedly it is one 
of the books of the hour. 

Mr. Wilson Barrett has associated himself 
with Mr. R. S. Hitchens in the double task of 
dramatizing a novel and novelizing a drama. 
The book that is being adapted for stage rep- 
resentation is that satirical novel, " The Lon- 
doners." The drama which is to be exploited 
n the literary arena is Mr. Barrett's Biblical 



Western Graphic 

and romantic 'play, "The Daughters of i Bab- 
ylon." Mr. John Macqueen will publish it 
early this year. 

To that large number of people who are 
trying to write dialogues for a play — anybody 
can do a plot — I commend the "Ambassa- 
dor," by "John Oliver Hobbes." Here are 
the speeches just right. The right number, 
short enough, cadenced so they run like con- 
versation, glancing, always about to say 
something, never quite saying it, and leaving 
no line in the memory. These are the indis- 
pensable technical conditions — save the two 
last; but unless you have them it is no use 
saying something and having lines that bite 
their record in the memory. After long lack, 
the current play is again literature, and Pin- 
ero, Jones, Hope, Rostand — all are publishing 
plays which sell by the edition. 

An edition of Browning in twelve octavos 
and to be complete is announced by George 
D. Sproul of New York. It will be limited 
to fewer than three hundred sets. Red initial 
letters and decorations will be us«d and the 
illustrations will comprise seventy-two plates. 
The editors are Charlette Porter and Helen A. 
Clarke. Each volume will have a special 
introduction. 




MRS. J. D FOSTER -Addressing 

Mr. Slason Thompson's biography of Eu- 
gene Field is in a decidedly embryonic condi- 
tion. He hopes to publish it next fall but the 
work is not yet begun. It will contain many 
of Mr. Field's inimitable letters. At present 
Mr. Thompson is engaged in going through 
the riles of the Record in the hope of making 
a book of Mr. Field's "Sharps and Flats" for 
Scribner's. The task is a difficult one because 
so many of them referred to events now for- 
gotten and would require much explanation. 

Sir Henry Irving's "The Theater in Its 
Relation to the State," his Cambridge Uni- 
versity address has appeared in a graceful 
dress which befits its dignified plea for the 
stage as an educator. 

Santiago has brought the usual swarm of 
war histories, but the only one likely to be 
permanently read is that of Lieutenant John 
H. Parkes' " History of the Catling Gun De- 
tachment." It is bumptious and glorifies the 
Gatlings, as is the way of us all; but Lieu- 
tenant Parker has written much and well on 
military affairs; he is a trained soldier; has 
no aim or end but narrative, and he is exact. 
Some things he says may hurt, but they are 
needed. Soldiering is a skilled trade. The 
volunteer had not learned it. He suffered in 
consequence. 




C. E. MAUDE— At First Tee 




Country Club Golf 

THERE were those who laughed at golf as 
a fad or sneered at it as snobbrey and 
declared that it would not last. But the 




MRS. HL'GH VAIL— Driving from first Tee 



tournament at the links of the Country Club 
a few days ago was a revelation of the sup- 
reme utility of the game — which is not at all 
the frivolous and inane pastime it had been 
accused of being by those who knew nothing 
of its test of strength, exercise, gentility and 
intellectuality. 

The upstart, by grace of money or genius 
or good luck or cheek, may succeed in pene- 
trating a certain distance into real society; he 
may, by the help of unlimited funds, natural 
adaptability and much perseverance, acquire 
an effect of being " to the manner born " 
when it is only a question of deportment and 
conversation, of a dinner parly or cotillion. 
But once you get him up to golf, his poor 
veneer of lineage cracks and falls from him 
like the patent leather in a cheap shoe in a 
rain storm. 

Probably thii is why society is really so 
complainant in respect of the parvenu. It 
knows that in the last analysis he is homeless 
because it is always possible to detect and 
confound him. It lets him give parties and 
hire threatre boxes and plunge around in 
handsoms or Victorias as much as he likes. 
But finally it thrusts a golf stick into his 




MRS. ED. SILENT— At Top of Drive 

hand and stands back with a cynical smile 
while the poor, forlorn, trembling wretch 
foozles his approach and socially extinguishes 
himself. 

The necessity of a postponement [of the 
Country Club's tourney from the first ^to the 
eighth not only produced no adverse effect but 
was productive of more than compensating 
features, as the rains made the links better 
conditioned and brought about that charm of 
atmosphere that follows a real old fashioned 
Pluvial visitation. It enabled the fair guests 
to appear in more magnificent plumage and 
more amplitude of hidden silken rustle. As 
we have once before stated, briefly, there was 
a brilliant assemblage and Messrs. M. S. Sev- 
erance, C. C. Carpenter and Charles Monroe, 
house committee; E. B. Tufts, Hugh Vail and 
J. F. Sartori, green committee; and the agree- 
able and energetic J. D. Foster, secretary and 



Western Graphic 



9 



treasurer, (the committee of arrangements) 
never lost a point in making the occasion 
highly delightful in every detail. A fine 
punch was served ad libitum and lunch and 
tea in the order named. 

It had been apprehended that B. C. Orr, 
the brilliant crack of the Pasadena Country 
Club, and graduate of the famous links of St. 
Andrews, Scotland, would carry off the hon- 
ors and the championship, and that W.Cosby 
would register an exceedingly close second. 
But no one had ever dreamed that M. S. Sev- 
erance, although a good player, would come 
so dangerously close, making the two 18-hole 
courses in ninety-two strokes each and finish- 
ing third in a field of twenty-five players. It 
will be seen by the score that Mr. Orr estab- 
lished a new record for the course of thirty- 
six holes as he made the four rounds in one 
hundred and sixty-eight strokes, lowering Mr. 
Cosby's record of one hundred and seventy- 
three by five points. Mr. Orr also took first 
honor in the driving contest, Mr. Cosby again 
scoring second. 

Mrs. Hugh Vail enraptured the crowd by 
her magnificent playing and won both the 
women's championship and the driving con- 
test. Her scores were fifty-nine and seventy- 
one. Mrs. J. D. Foster came dangerously close 
to Mrs. Vail and is a most excellent and 
hearty player and will become one of the most 
accomplished in the state. Mrs. Fred Griffith 
was a close second (95 yards) in the women's 
driving, Mrs. Vail accomplishing one hundred 
yards. 

The scores were as follows: 





C. E. ORR— At Top of Drive 

men's championship 
1st 

Name and club — R'nd 

C. E. Orr, Pasadena 82 

W. Cosby, Los Angeles.. . . 90 
M. S. Severance, L.Angeles 92 

E. C. Jones, Redondo 88 

C. E. Maud, Riverside 88 

A. Butcher, Riverside 91 

H. May, Los Angeles 98 

J. F. Sartori, Los Angeles. 97 
R. H. Chapman, L. Angeles 99 
W.A.Young, Santa Monica 98 
J. E. Cook, Los Angeles. . . 99 
E. B. Tufts, Los Angeles. . 108 
J.H.P.Voothees, Pasadena. 102 
J. H. Nicoll, Los Angeles. . 104 
H. W. Vail, Los Angeles.. 103 
R.J.C.Wood,Highland P's.104 
R. Jones, Santa Monica.. .115 
N.W.Howard, S. Catalina.106 

P. Rowan, Pasadena 115 

S. Bates, Catalina 109 

A. J. Morgan, Highland P.108 
H. R. Warner, Redondo. .. 109 
A. F. Borden, Redondo. . .122 
H. Robertson, Highland .. 127 

J. A. ParKer 142 

women's championship 

Mrs. H. W. Vail 59 

Mrs. J. D. Foster 69 

Miss Bertha Crouch 68 

Mrs. J. F. Sartori 75 

Miss Silent 66 

Mrs. Porter 68 

Miss McCrae 73 

Mrs. Bartling 76 

Mrs. J. Griffith 81 

Mrs. Warner 89 

Mrs. Ryan 85 



2d 




R'nd 


Total 


86 


168 


87 


177 


92 


184 


97 


185 


97 


185 


95 


186 


90 


188 


94 


191 


95 


194 


97 


195 


97 


196 


93 


201 


99 


201 


101 


205 


105 


208 


109 


213 


98 


213 


108 


214 


112 


127 


120 


229 


122 


230 


124 


233 


112 


234 


121 


248 


130 


272 


.71 


130 


64 


133 


66 


134 


66 


141 


68 


144 


76 


144 


72 


145 


89 


165 


93 


174 


89 


178 


93 


178 



The f)orse Show 

■pebruary I, 2, 3,4, 1899 

WILLIAM CURLETT, the architect of 
the Horse Show, arrived from San 
Francisco Sunday morning, and active build- 
ing will begin in preparation for the Horse 
Show in Fiesta Park at once. 

Handsome posters will soon be distributed 
throughout the cit3', Pasadena, Santa_Monica, 




ARTHUR BUTCHER— At Finish of Drive 

and so on, announcing the dates of the exhi- 
bitions. Notwithstanding the entries have 
closed many applications have been received 
for permission to enter horses in the different 
events, but as the official program has gone to 
press it is impossible to accept these entries. 
At least 250 horses have been entered in the 
books of the Horse Show, and all classes have 
filled with the exception of two or three. 

In addition to this array of horses and 
supplemental to the regular program there 
will be a number of post entries made during 
the Horse Show, such as special events for 
six-in hands, lasso throwing, rough riding, 
and so on. Among other attractive exhibits 
the entry of Mr. Dixie Thompson of Santa 
Barbara with his famous saddle horse and 
wonderful Spanish saddle and bridle heavily 
weighted with silver will be conspicuous. It 
has always been an attractive feature of the 
parades in which it has been shown. 

Mr. A. Howard of San Francisco recently 
telephoned from that city ordering a private 
box and making several entries. 

Additional to the $8,000 offered in prizes 
and to the cups which have been "hung up" 
there will be a large number'of special prizes 
offered for floral day, which under the super- 
vision of Count von Schmidt promises to he a 
picturesque feature. 

Following the Horse Show, on February 6, 
at Agricultural Park, will take place the much 
talked of polo match between the teams of 
Burlingame and Riverside. Each of these 
teams will bring two carloads of polo ponies, 
which will be entered in some of the post 
entries of the Horse Show as well as taking 
part in the polo game. On Februaiy 7 there 
will be at Agri- 
cultural Park a 
meeting devoted 
to pony races 
with gentlemen 
riders. There will 
be six races all 
told, for which 
Mr. M. M. Pot- 
ter of the Van 
Nuys hotel and 
Messrs. N. W. 
My rick and E. 
M. Ware have 
offered hand- 
some special 
prizes. The ri- 
valry between 
these two teams 
is great and the 



contests previously held have been so sharp 
that much interest will be aroused by this 
coming meeting of the two famous teams of 
Riverside and Burlingame and there will un- 
doubtedly be a large attendance. 

For the lasso throwing contest and other 
contests involving expert horsemanship there 
have already been several entries, among 
them being Mr. J. R. Carrillo, who has a 
national reputation for fine riding, and two 
vaqueros from Santa Barbara, who will be 
brought down from that city. There is no 
entry fee for these events of lasso throwing and 
so on, and the managers of the Horse Show 
will be glad to receive additional entries from 
the Spanish population who certainly must be 
able to contribute many expert riders. This 
feature should prove very attractive to the 
Eastern tourists who will be present, few of 
whom have seen a riata thrown or witnessed 
the marvelous feats in riding for which the 
Mexicans and native Californians are famous. 

Chari.es Cassat Davis i3 one of the happiest 
men in Los Angeles, a.nd in the world; for he 
was made President of the Board of Education 
because he was honest and had aligned him- 
self with the people and against the boodlers 
of the Board. The people of Los Angeles are 
greatly indebted to Mr. Davis because he pos- 
sessed the nerve and determination to ferret 
out the misdeeds of a number of members. 
It was Mr. Davis who ran down the scoundrel 
Webb and who made the smooth piano dealer 
let up on his bulldozing tactics of trade. 
There was more shame in that rotten old 
School Board than had ever been known 
before, and memories of it will remain a long 
time. The greatest honor that Mr. Davis has 
had, however, was when the people of all de- 
nominations of politics in his district voted 
for his re election. This paper congratulates 
you, Mr. President Davis. 



A man never knows how little he is worth 
until the sheriff disposes of his property. A 
case in view: Man mortgrges his house for 
$3000 at 10 per cent. House cost $6000. 
Interest, sickness, foreclosure, advertising, 
sheriff's sale. Man gets $.'5000 for his $6000 
house. Dead easy. 



Mr. Vanderbilt " laughed heartily and 
applauded vigorously " the cake walk at Bilt- 
more. Mr. Vanderbilt is a rollicking fellow 
and his laughter has the merry sound of 
shears clipping coupons, and his applause 
that of New York Central stock paying quar- 
terly dividends. 

The man who has enough money to enable 
him to live in idleness won't, and the poor 
man who would can't. 

Better fish remain in the sea than ever 
were caught. The bride never weds the " best 
man." 




THE CLUB HOUSE OK THE LOS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB 



Ill 



Western Graphic 




WE folks who from inclination or neces- 
sity must go to see everything in the 
theatrical line have been filled to a good deal 
more than a "'genteel sufficiency" this week 
and there is no doubt but that many church 
pews will be empty tomorrow through the 
necessity of their owners catching up on sleep. 
The Los Angeles theatre has been the center 
of attraction and manager Wyatt's face has 
been one continuous performance smile stim- 
ulated by the sight of the lines of people in 
front of the box office window. They were a 
grand series of performances and it would be 
an indeed officious critic who would presume 
to use even his weakest solution of gall upon 
the work of James Kidder- Warde. 

TT h particularly refreshing, and actually a 
J- treat after having been bored to death 
with poor plays, sticks posing as stars, late 
New York successes with most of the success 
left in New York, to be able to witness Sheri- 
dan's good old comedy " The School for Scan- 
dal " played by Louis James, Kathryn Kidder 
and Frederick Warde, whose names alone 
would suffice without further comment. 

I h8vea great affection for all these dear 
people; Warde and James have been with us 
many times and the applause accorded them 
on Monday evening proved beyond a doubt 
that their friends are legion in this, our Angel 
city. And Kathryn Kidder won our hearts, 
and incidentalty the contents of our wallets 
too, when she brought us " Sans Gene." 

"The School of the Scandal is an old love 
of mine. The quaintness of it, the brocades, 
the satins, the court grace and La! La! the 
frivolity of it all delights my soul. Heigho! — 
I am sighing for a day that has gone 
never to return, and it almost makes me long 
to be reincarnated and come back in the spirit 
of my great great-grandmother. I have a 
grudging sort of fondness for "ye old time 
lover." I wish that sort of thing went in our 
century; but on second thought nothing else 
in this hurly-burly work-a-day world would 
just exactly jibe with it; for instance, if a man 
came a-wooing me in a white satin court 
costume with silk stockings and ribbons and a 
lace kerchief, gold snuff box and a wig, his 
face besmeared with powder, and a lovely 
little black patch to leeward of his right eye, 
and should kiss my hand and mumble sweet 
nothings over it and tell me that I was lovely 
and positively distracting, I should consider 
it my duty to ring for the butler and have 
him shown the street door. 

Ah! "woe is me," I really have a vein of 
sentiment and romance which is being crushed 
and withered in this dry and dusty age. 

Goodbye to the court of George the Third, 
goodbye sweet Lady Teazle, and goodbye 
Charles and Joseph Surface. I wonder if you 
will ever come back to us. Miss K. 



AGAIN I must remark on the spectacle of 
such unquestionably talented people 
as Pilar Morin, Rose Eytinge and Clement 
Bainbridge presenting the same twenty-minute 
comedy two weeks in succession. Of course 
they will say that Augustus Thomas does not 
write skits like "That Overcoat" for two bits 
a dozen, and that in the East the show houses 
are so thick that there is no necessity for a 
repertoire; but that does not keep me awake 



during the second performance of the piece, 
and the Orpheum certainly pays them enough 
to provide a variety of entertainment. 

The Deltorelli brothers make one think of 
the old pantomime, and have most astonish- 
ing and grotesque makeups. 

Anna Teresa Berger is an artist on the 
cornet and it was one of the very few times I 
have been able to sit comfortably and listen 
to a cornet solo in an auditorium no larger 
than the Orpheum. Miss Berger puts feeling 
even into the air of a coon song. 

One of the prettiest turns for a long time 



Something ought to be done to keep George 
Golden here all the time; he is almost as good 
for the blues as an inch of rain. 

Willie Ozeola does some tricks on two 
wires with a lamp on his head, and possibly 
other things, but so many ill mannered people 
can not possibly wait for the last five minutes 
of the show and climb all over the others in 
their race for the door that those who do want 
to see it all must wait till next week, when 
Mr. Ozeola's turn will be advanced on the 
program. 




THE RAITO SISTERS-AT THE ORPHEUM 



is the Russian dancing of the Rappo sisters, 
and it is an item of education to see in these 
graceful, bounding, nimble young women the 
"real thing" from the land of the czar. Be- 
cause their legs are concealed in the ample 
folds of bloomers and skirts and their feet in 
dainty red boots they do not get the hearty 
recall from the bald heads; but nevertheless 
most people enjoy their dancing for it is such 
a relief from the buck and wing, clog and 
cake walk. 



For another week Nance O'Neil filled the 
Burbank at every performance, and after 
another week leave for a short tour of 
Southern California, and then East and to 
England. Miss O'Neil's best friends all hope 
that she will soon retire for a rest, as her fu- 
ture success undoubtedly depends largely upon 
the treatment she gives her voice, and at the 
pace she is using it now it will ere long be 
gone forever — and a human being only has 
one voice. 



Western Graphic 



As Leah, in "The Jewess," Miss O'Neildoes 
her best work, the part being especially suited 
to her style. In "Oliver Twist" the opportun- 
ities are in the character of Fagin, which Mr. 
Herbert Carr did with conscientious attention 
to every detail; and as Xancy Sykes Miss 
O'Neil is all that could be wished. Of all the 
horrible melodramas "Oliver Twist" is the 
most depressing and unsatisfactory. There is 
not a spark of the higher side of life deline- 
ated in the play; there is no moral or lesson 
that would appeal to respectable people, and 
the brutality and ugly passions leave only a 
bad taste and an inclination to dodge one's 
shadow on the way home. "Oliver Twist" 
should be laid on the top shelf in the chamber 
of horrors. 




HI HENRY, AT THE LOS ANGELES 



LOS Angeles Theater— Hi Henry's big city mins- 
trels of fifty star performers direct from their great 
success at San Francisco will hold sway at the Los 
Angeles theater the entire week of January 23, with 
two matinees Wednesday and Saturday. This at- 
traction is specially complimented by the press of 
New York City, Boston, Philadelphia and San Fran- 
cisco, as haviog exceptionally fine singers and tal- 
ented comedians, accomplished dancers and an exten- 
sive olio of eight high grade vaudeville, Mr. Hi 
Henry bears a national recognition as a minstrel 
manager and is in the field with a large, expensive 
organization and their program presents new, novel, 
refined and elegant minstrelsy. 

This consists of a grand patriotic naval represen- 
tation on board the flagship Brooklyn before Santiago 
Bay, marines and Jackies being represented by Li 
Henry's ninstrels. The big turret is there and the 
frowning guns, searchlights, and the moving prides 
of our navy, the battleships Oregon, Indiana, Texas 
and others. This is pronounced the most startling 
scene ever presented on a mimic stage. Their list of 
talents is composed of strictly New York City vaude- 
ville favorites, each of whom have made their hits in 
that city, among them the star comedian Dan Allman, 
the popular comedian Billy Clark, the noted charac- 
ter comedians, Teal and Baker, artists without a rival 
in their line; the wonderful harmonica imitation by 
Morton, the mysterious paper tearing by Elliott, the 
witticisms by Dan Allman, monologue and funny 
musical team Roberts and Clarke and the marvels of 
the country, the Parisan sensation lists, the Coulture 
Brothers, and Mr. Hi Henry will appear in his inimi- 
table cornet solos, supported by his full handsone 
military band of thirty soloists. Their vocal depart- 
ment embraces the names of the best artists in their 
line; we mention the great tenor, J. H. Davis, also M. 
J. Malvain also Robert Sinclair, the favorite bari- 
tones, Oscar Michaelis and Frank B. Morton, the 
well known soloist, J. Albert Gates, the wonder mas- 
ter, Johnny Reeves, the eminent bassos George W. 
Decker and Roger De Coverly. Watch for their 
great street parade at noon tomorrow and hear their 
grand classical concert in front of the theater at 
7 p. m. 

Symphony Orchestra— Owing to a very severe rain 
storm January 10 the attendance for the fourth Sym- 
phony Orchestra concert was very light. All day the 
box office of the Los Angeles theater was receiving 
requests to either have the concert postponed or have 
it repeated in the near future. Owing to quite a num- 
ber of subscribers who are residents of Pasadena, 
Santa Monica, Santa Ana and other points who had 
already telephoned to have their seats reserved it was 
found impracticable to postpone it, consequently the 
concert was given to the gratification and satisfaction 



of a small but enthusiastic audience. Since then so 
many requests have been made to Director Hamilton 
to repeat this concert that it will be given in its en- 
tirety next Tuesday afternoon, January 24, at 3 p. m. 
It is to be hoped that all the subscribers whose 
seats will be reserved for them and all the 
music lovers of Los Angeles will turn out in force to 
help make up for the loss incurred at the last concert. 
To those who enjoy an excellent musical program 
this concert as given by our local orchestra will in- 
deed be a pleasure and is undoubtedly the best work 
yet presented by this clever organization. Reserved 
seats now on sale. 



Orpheum - It will be a bit of welcome news to a 
host of people that the Orpheum next week numbers 
among its leading attractions the name of Barton 
Hill, known from end to end of the continent as one 
of the finest actors of his time, and even now a player 
excelled by but few in the skill required to worthily 
portray comedy characters. None surpass Hill in the 
esteem of the California public, for he is particularly 
of California, in that the old and famous California 
Theatre Stock Company numbered him as one of its 
leading members twenty years ago and more. Mr. 
Hill is supported by Charles Willard, Ella Sothern, 
and a fine company of comedians. He will present a 
splendid piece of play writing by Milton Nobles, 
called " Belinda Bailey's Boarders.'' It will be the 
strongest comedy card the Orpheum has played in 
many months and this is saying considerable. 

Frause and Rosa are two young women much bet- 
ter known in the east than on the coast, but the repu- 
tation they have of being among the sweetest singers 
and greatest fun makers in vaudeville, will, no doubt, 
insure for them a warm welcome next Monday night 
when they make their bow to an Orpheum audience. 

Querita Vincent, a dancer of great skill and a cap- 
able singer as well, has a prominent place on the bill. 
She is expected to contribute a very meritorious 
number to a strong bill. 

The Rappo Sisters, whose wonderful dancing has 
been the talk of the town since Monday night last, 
will be continued in a prominent place on the pro- 
gram. They have never been excelled or even ap- 
proached as danceis and their like is not apt to be 
ever again seen in this city. Crowded houses have 
applauded to the echo their matchless work. 

Miss Anna Teresa Berger has captured all hearts 
with her artistic cornet playing and will undoubtedly 
continue to be as great a favorite next week as she is 
this. 

Willy Ozeola, the equilibrist, and the funny Del- 
torelli Bros., musical grotesques, complete the great 
bill. 

Papinta, the fire dancer, is coming. 



Gerome Helmont — Of Master Gerome Helmont, 
the famous boy violinist, an eastern exchange writes: 
"When Helmont plays there is music in the air and 
when it comes to clawing the classics out of one of 
Mr. Stradivarius' best fiddles, he approached the 
peerless class in his own poiseful and peerless way. 
How the fiddle sings to a fellow who has a soul for its 
music—it weeps, it sobs, it chuckles, it grins, it breaks 
into loud gaffaws, and then there is a flood of tears, 
the music of rain among the leaves, strains of music 
from the throats of birds, phanlom-like phantasies 
that weave about one's heart exquisite sensations that 
fill the eyes with tears. Great is the violin and when 
Helmont lays it to his cheek and puts the bow across 
its melodious strings, the soul of it awakens and its 
spirit is alive and it is glad that it is living. He 
sweeps the bow about it and the air swims with the 
spirits of melody, the soul is entranced and the ear 
tickles until the heart aches. There are so few mas- 
ters of the little, shining, graceful music box which 
masters most people who attempt to play it, and 
when one comes along who has reached the very soul 
of its mysteries, the populace may be excused for 
lionizing it." 

The dates for Helmont's appearance in Los An- 
geles are the evenings of January 2<>th and 27th and 
the afternoon of the 28th at Simpson auditorium. He 
will be assisted by Miss Ida Simmons the distin- 
guished pianist, and Miss Grace Preston who will be 
remembered as the noted contralto with Nordica last 



Burbank— Nance O'Neil is to stay at the Burbank 
theatre one more week. Manager Shaw returned 
Thursday from a trip to San Francisco where he suc- 
ceeded in changing the dates for other companies in 
order to make possible a continuation of MissO'Neil's 
engagement. The coming week will afford the young 
tragedienne's admirers the last opportunity of Beeing 
her for some time as she starts for England immedi- 
ately following her engagement in this city whero 
she will remain for several years. The repertoire for 
the farewell week will be: Monday night and Wednes- 
day matinee "Led Astray," Tuesdey night "Camille," 
Wednesday night "Guy Mannering," Thursday night 
"Ingomar," Friday night "Tho Jewess," Saturday 
matinee "East Lynne," Saturday night "Oliver 
Twist." 

T OS ANGELES THEATKR 

| j The Most Perfect Acoustics of any Building i" Hie City 
Tuesday Afternoon, Jan. 24th. lit :s.ir> o'clock 
Fifth Concert of the Season 1898-99, given l>y the Los Alleles 




ii 



Miss M. Deane of Los Angeles is an acqui- 
sition to the ranks of pleasant people who 
have salved the problem of how to be happy 
by taking up their residence at the Redondo 
hotel. 



MAIN STREET 
BET. FIRST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vsudevil 
Theater 

Week Commencing Holiday, Jan. 23. 

Barton Hill land Company, in a new (oinedv l>v Milton 
riia*. Willard - Nobles, entitled : 

Klla Sothern ) " Belinda Bailey's Boarders." 

Km ma Krause / , ., . , ^ . . ^ , , 

Margaret Bona \ their original Dutch Picanninies. 

(juerita Vincent, Dainty Singer and Dancer. 

Ka|>po Sisters, Russia's Wonderful erpsichorean Artistes 

Willie Ozeola, Marvelous Equilibrist 

Anna Teresa I5erj;er, World's Best I.ady Cornet Virtuoso 
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EVENING 25 and 50 cts, gallery 10c. Matinees Wednesday 
Saturday and Sunday, any seat in the house 25c 



T3URBANK THEATER 

I ) Main St., bet. Fifth and Sixth. Tel. M 1270 

C. A. SHAW, Lessee 

Farewell Week, 

Monday Night and Wednesday Matinee " LED astray." 

Tuesday Night " CAM I U.K.- 
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Thursday Night " INUOMAK. ' 

Friday Night " TIIK JEWESS." 

Saturdav Matinee " K A ST I.YNNK " 

Saturday Night " OLIVER TWIST." 

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BestauTant and Befreshments 
Last car of the evening in every direction and for 
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After Theater Parties 



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f. edward Gray, prop. 

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Telephone M.iin 568. 

We grow all our flowers and plants at our 
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Haui.ky Hamilton, 
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s. w. jmnnaoRi 

Soloist 



Season Tickets, good for 20 admissions with preferred re- 
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Seats now on sale. Tel. Main 70. 



Three medals awarded at Hamburg Exposi 
tion for GLADIOLUS and AMARYLLIS. Particu 
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originated by us will be mailed on applicatiuo 



12 



Western Graphic 



A LOS ANGELES MAN IN CUBA 

LESS than two months ago Thomas D. 
Mott, Jr., eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas D. Mott, concluded that Cuba be- 
trayed prospects that contained more than 
promise to a man like himself, who had been 
liberally educated at Notre Dame in Indiana 
and the Columbia Law College in Washing- 
ton, and whose knowledge of Ihe English and 
the Spanish language was equally scholarly 
and useful. And away he went, with fine 
letters from prominent eastern commercial 
men, attorneys and theologians. He sojourned 
a week or two at South Bend, Indiana, with 
his wife and child, and in a few days after- 
ward was sailing out of New York for Santi- 
ago de Cuba. He writes very beautiful letters 
to South Bend, which are, in turn, sent to his 
parents here, one of which has been shown 
this paper, a portion of which we make use of 
today, reserving another portion for next 
week, as follows: 

We left the Seneca's dock at the foot of 
Wall street on the East river about 4:30 p. m., 
Thursday, November 10. It had been a mean 
day and the rain was now falling gently, so 
that when we reached mid stream the high 
buildings were almost lost to view. We did 
not pass under Brooklyn bridge, but as the 
ship turned and pointed her prow towards 
the Atlantic a good view of the gigantic 
structure could be had from the stern. 
Numerous cars, wagons and persons were 
crossing the bridge in both directions. Truly 
this is the great artery of the body corporate 
called "Greater New York," along which the 
people move, circulating backward and foi- 
ward like so many drops of blood, some to- 
ward the heart of the system, "Old New 
York," there again to be dispersed, each to 
his proper part of this immense organism. 

Down the river we went, passing numerous 
craft of all descriptions and getting a noisy 
and hoarse farewell. We passed Governor's 
Island on our left. A little farther down and 
the imposing lines of the Statue of Liberty 
loomed up on our right, and as we passed the 
torch was suddenly lighted and the great 
monument seemed to take on life, for in the 
change of light and shadow one imagined 
animation. It was an inspiring sight to see 
this emblem of a sublime civilization holding 
high in air its luminous torch and as you 
catch the brilliant rays to feel this holy light 
will one day ilood the world. It thrilled me, 
and unconsciously I hummed "America." 

After passing Staten Island on our right 
we reached the Narrows, and here the captain 
decided to cast anchor over night as there was 
almost a gale blowing and a storm had been 
predicted off the coast. The last thing I saw 
that night just before entering my stateroom 
was a large and brilliant star, almost midway 
between the horizon and the meridian, but 
somewhat nearer to the former. It was the 
torch of the Statue of Liberty. 



The ringing of the ship's bell awoke me 
early the next morning and by six o'clock I 
was on deck. A few moments later we had 
weighed anchor and were under way. There 
to our left was Coney Island, the gay, the 
giddy and. almost fantastic home of revelry 
and sport. There was something of frolic 
even in the bright reflection of the morning 
sun by the windows of the great hotels and I 
thought I caught a message of a merry " bon 
voyage." Soon we were abreast of Sandy 
Hook. At this point a man of war passed us 
on our port side. We knew by its dull gray 
color that it was one of the defenders of our 
" Uncle Samuel." It proved to be the Newark 
carrying Admiral Schley and the commission 
from San Juan. 

We passed Cape Hatteras about seven 
o'clock the next morning. The waters which 
hereabouts are usually troubled and boisterous 
were comparatively calm and smooth. We 
were not long in passing this dangerous point 
for which all mariners have a wholesome fear, 
and toward noon the temperature grew per- 
ceptibly warmer; we had entered the Gulf 
Stream. The weather continued fair, the ship 
plowed its furrows in a sea so calm that little 
more than ripples broke the surface, and so 
without misadventure or unpleasant experi- 
ence we reached Nassau about noon of Mon- 
day, November 14. 

We did not enter the inner bay as the 
Seneca was drawing too much water to cross 
the bar. The view of Nassau from where we 
had anchored was truly picturesque and beau- 
tiful; it looked like a terraced garden with 
the sea at its feet. A tug took us ashore and 
we landed almost in the heart of the city. 
No sooner had we set foot on terra firina than 
we were surrounded by a large, jabbering crowd 
of darkies, who hung to you like leeches offering 
their services for this, that or the other thing. 
The town seems to be a thriving and busy 
place, with good, clean streets. The soil of 
the island is of lime or coral formation, mak- 
ing the finest roads I have ever seen, hard 
and entirely free from dust. It was a pleasure 
to ride over them, even though it was in a 
vehicle that had long since passed its prime. 
There are no hacks in Nassau, the public con- 
veyances being all open carriages like rocka- 
ways, all in a more or less state of decay. 
They are driven by darkeys who call 3'ou 
" boss" and " massa " and end every sentence 
with a " sir." If these fellows see a stranger 
walking the streets, two or three will walk 
their horses along after him continually urg- 
ing him to ride. 

We drove through the different quarters 
of the town and out into the surrounding 
country. After passing beyond the business 
part the streets became very narrow, and from 
them still narrower lanes lead to the gardens 
and houses of more pretentions. But, for the 
most part, these roads are dotted on both sides 
at near distances by low, thatched roofed, 
frame buildings about fifteen feet square in 
dimensions and none containing more than 
three or four rooms. Here the darkies live. 



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WHEEL CHAIRS a 

Sold or Rented specialty 

Second Hand Gooda Bought, Bold 
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12 SHAVE TICKET $1.00 HAIRCUT 15c ~ 
SHAVE 10C 





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503 West Sixth St. 



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SPRING OF '99 * 

mN CALIFORNIA winter is such an obsolete season in reality that Western Graphic will christen its big annual 
number, that is to issue the latter part of February, (which in less favored climes would be correctly called "mid- 
winter") "The Spring of '99" edition. This will be an edition of forty or more pages, edited with the most 
painstaking accuracy, illustrated as only the Western Graphic can illustrate and the cover will be a photo-chrome repro- 
duction of a water color painted expressly for the journal by Miss M. E. Curran, a talented young artist of Los An- 
geles. Without exception this will be the finest newspaper cover ever printed in the United States. 

This number will be most entertaining for eastern people and will be sold wrapped for mailing at 25 cents per copy. 
Application for advertising space and orders for copies should be addressed to 

Western Graphic 

311=313 New High Street, Los Angeles 



Western Graphic; 



13 



These people all go bare-footed, and one can 
see women in ah sorts of attire, most of them 
wearing but one garment. In the tropics 
clothes are really a burden and oppresses one. 
In the city the children are, for the most part , 
clad in ligh trousers and a blouse, but beyond 
the business streets they usually wear but a 
skirt which reaches half way down to their 
knees, and some wear no clothes at all. Of 
this nothing is thought, custom and the clim- 
ate making it natural. 

A point intensely interesting on the island 
is Fort Charlotte, an old Spanish fort built in 
A. D. 1730. It is situated at the extreme west 
end of the town and occupies a commanding 
position. Here one goes down a spiral stair- 
way, straight down for about forty feet into 
the solid rock. Imagine a pillar going down 
perpendicular for a distance of forty feet into 
the rock, and a stairway winding round and 
round this pillar like the thread of a cork- 
screw down into the bowels of the earth, and 
you have the stairway in question. At the 
bottom there are two rifle pits from which a 
dungeon some thirty by twenty feet in dimen- 
sions is reached. Here political prisoners were 
kept; the poor fellows literally buried alive, 
never seeing the light of day or the beautiful 
blue of heaven above. An inky darkness, a 
chilling dampness, sickness and hunger were 
their constant companions, death was their 
only friend. One can yet see a small hole 
some seven inches in width and twenty-four 
in height piercing the wall five feet thick like 
a slit, through which food was thrown to the 
poor wretches. In a passage leading from the 
foot of the stairway and distance some one 
hundred feet therefrom is a wall from which 
the garrison of the fort was supplied with 
water. This well is sunk through the solid 



rock to such a great depth that it takes a stone 
three and a half seconds to reach the bottom. 
It must have taken a long time and required 
great persistence to have sunk such a well 
with the crude and primitive instruments of 
one hundred and fifty years ago. To cap the 
climax, there are seven miles of underground 
passages leading to various parts of the island. 
This fort has its legend as indeed have all the 
forts one visits in the tropics, but I shall not 
give it here as neither time nor space permit. 
Nassau has already taken too much of both, 
and so I shall bid it goodbye with one last 
reservation. For every white person I saw 
there must have been one hundred or more 
negroes. 

By nine o'clock the next morning the ship 
had finished discharging all cargo consigned 
to Nassau. Shortly afterward we weighed 
anchor and in an hour and a half had lost 
sight of the beautiful spot which stands like 
an emerald set in liquid blue. All that day 
we kept in sight of land for our course now 
cook us past the Bahamas. As a matter of 
fact from Nassau to Santiago there are so 
many is lands that one is not long beyond 
the sight of land at any one time. About 
midnight of Tuesday, Nov. 15th, we passed 
Cat's Island, but at such a distance to our 
starboard that only the light from the light- 
house could be seen. Here is where the Maria 
Teresa now lies, having gone ashore after be- 
ing abandoned in a severe storm. 

We were now in the famous windward pas- 
sage, usually a stormy and dangerous part of 
of the voyage, for here fierce hurricanes arise 
so suddenly and overtake a shij< so quickly 
that the barometer cannot give the warning 
and the ship is usually unprepared to meet 
the storm. Many an unfortunate ship and 



many good lives are lost in these waters every 
year. The islands hereabouts are inhabited 
only by wreckers who await only that misfor- 
tune overtake a ship and drive her ashore 
that they might pounce upon her and strip 
her of everything of value. I am told that 
one might as well fall into the hands of pir- 
ates as into the hands of these wreckers. The 
hurricane season begins about July 1st and 
ends towards the beginning of November. We 
found the windward passage comparatively 
calm, although the breeze which always blows 
here and the currents that here abound al- 
ways make the sea decidedly choppy. 

We sighted Cape Maysi about midnight of 
Wednesday; by the aid of the light from the 
light-house I could see the dark shadow of the 
coast. It was my first sight of Cuba. * * 

King Humbert of Italy has conferred the 
title of duke of Apulia upon the infant son of 
the duke and duchess of Aosta. 

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Tickets 
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Everybody who has One dollar to spend will 
take someone and go to the Horse Show. 

Western Graphic 



Will give to each new six-months subscriber 
A Present of Two Tickets to the 
Horse Show 

Think of it ! Twenty-six issues of the finest 
illustrated paper on the Pacific Coast and two 
50-cent tickets to -the show for $1.00. Call at or 
address 



Tel Main 1053 Geo. Rice & Sons (Inc.) 

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The Nation of the Nations. 

Grandly, proudly, she has risen from the 
slumber of the past. 

And tyrant nations tremble at her vi- 
brant trumpet's blast. 

As match li'ss as the radiant dawn that 
quivers into light 

The great peace loving nation stands, the 
champion of right. 

The nation of the nations! 

She was born to bleed for man 
When young war's wild pulsations 

Through her veins, God driven, ran 
And thrilled to birth the great of earth, 

Who broke a tyrant's ban. 

And now that she has risen, can she rend 

the future's veil 
And see the tears and treasures strewn 

along the crimson trail 
Of war? And can she read the lines 

which fate has yet to write? 
Does she know the power of patriotism 

to foster or to blight? 

The nation of the nations! 

In her youth she saw the star 
Of truth above temptations, 

In the clouds of doubt afar, 
And followed it, while glory lit 
Her faith, which naught could mar. 

Experience will show her that the truth 

is in these lines. 
The stars and stripes must ever wave 

above the Philippines, 
And all that she has conquered must be 

held by force of arms. 
From Porto Rico's fertile fields to Cuba's 

wasted charms. 

The nation of the nations! 

Trials, troubles she must face 
And bear her tribulations 

For the heroes of her race. 
Who falter not in storms of shot. 

But crowd for honor's place. 

ENVOY. 
Oh, nation of the nations! 

Instrument of liberty! 
Prom foreign complications 

One alone can keep you free! 
With outstretched hands she proudly 
stands, 
The "mistress of the sea!' 
-Will E. Maiden In St. Paul Pioneer 
Press. 



Antique Furniture in llnvnnn. 

Collectors of antique furniture have 
struck a bonanza in Havana. In prepar- 
ing to return to Spain army officers are 
placing on the market pieces of fine 
workmanship and ancient pattern, 
which are being eagerly snapped up by 
dealers. A correspondent cites a hand- 
some old walnut wardrobe, with three 
full length bevel mirrors, valued at 
$150, which sold for less than $15, and 
that is simply one of many examples. — 
Ciuc*niif> r i (JnmmeTcial Tribune. 



The ' Spring: of 99" Edition of Western 
Graphic will be an elaborate affair never 
before equalled in the United States. Cal- 
ifornia will be proud of the issue 

\ Queer Alliance. 

The Versailles (Ky. ) Sun tells this 
yarn of a queer feathered alliance: Mr. 
Emilius Moraucy tells of a partridge 
that took up with a turkey hen and 
brood of youug turkeys on Mrs. Sallie 
Neal's place a abort time ago and is 
still with them, roosting with then, ev- 
ery night and feeding with the turkeys 
at the kitchen door in the morning. 
Frequently when the family of turkeys 
gets separated tho partridge flies to the 
top rail of the fence and whistles "Bob 
White" until they all get together 
again. Several times the partridge has 
been driven away from the turkeys, just 
to see what effpot it would have, and he 
has always returned to them at the tir.-t 
opportunity. 

Thla Goose Came Over in Thirty-nine. 

Crawford county, O., lays claim to 
having not the biggest, but tho oldest 
goose perhaps in this country. Abram 
Guiss came to the United States from 
Germany in 18:i!) and brought with him 
a goose. After keeping her 20 years he 
sold her to Lafayette Nigh, who kept 
her until three years ago. He then turn- 
ed her over to John Guiss, a son of 
Abram Guiss, who has her in his pos- 
session now. She laid several eggs last 
spring and raised four goslings. Shu 
still looks well and walks around in a 
kind of a "don't yon want your life in- 
sured" way. She is nearly 60 years old. 
—Cleveland Plain Dtuler. 

Spain's. 820.000,000. 
What'll we do with this money of ours— 

Money we scarcely expected? 
No one will hint that we've wasted th* 
hours 

Nor the country's finances neglected. 

Shall we devote it to powder and shot 

And talk about fierceness and slaughter 
Buying ships, to be added no doubt to ou. 
lot 

Of scrap iron under salt water? 

Shall we simulate pride and still sneer at 
the rules 

By which the world makes Its progres 
sion? 

Or shall we hire teachers and open up 
schools 

And try to be In the procession? 

—Washington Star. 



14 



Tht Crown of the Valley 

THE most largely attended social event 
ever occurring in Pasadena was the 
opening reception given Monday evening at 
Hotel Green signalizing the completion of the 
west building of the hotel. The date for 
the function was chosen as being the anniver- 
sary of Colonel G. G. Green's birthday and it 
was thought this would furnish a fitting op- 
portunity for the people of Pasadena to extend 
congratulations to the owner of this mam- 
moth hostlery upon his achievement in add- 
ing such a magnificent building to Pasadena. 
In this, however, the guests were disappointed 
as Colonel Green was confined to his room 
with an attack of grip, this unfortunate occur- 
rence being the only thing which marred the 
pleasure of the occasion. 

The east and west buildings of the hotel 
as well as the connecting link of Moorish 
bridge was ablaze with electricity, myriads of 
lights Hashing from basement to roof garden. 
Turrets and minarets were outlined against 
the evening sky in red and green incandes- 
cent lights, and Japanese lanterns were strung 
about the balustrade of the roof garden and 
festooned from pillars to towers adding their 
dancing lights to the general effect of bril- 
liancy. 

Many guests from Los Angeles, Redondo, 
Santa Monica, San Gabriel and surrounding 
towns arrived at the hotel early in the after- 
noon remaining over night for the festivities 
and from seven o'clock to nine the broad ave- 
nues surrounding the hotel buildings were 
packed with conveyances bringing handsomely 
attired guests. The general formal reception 
was held in the west building but the entire 
hotel was hospitably thrown open. In the 
Moorish reception room with its harmonious 
furnishings in quiet green the reception party 
was stationed. This consisted of Mrs. G. G. 
Green, Miss Green, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. 
Holmes and Mr. and Mrs. Franc L. Grannis. 
Mrs. Green was elegantly attired in black vel- 
vet point lace and diamonds; Miss Green wore 
a lovely decolette gown of pale blue satin 
trimmed with duchesse lace, Mrs. Holmes was 
becomingly gowned in pink satin brocade 
with Nile green accessories, Mrs. Grannis wore 
a Paris gown of white chiffon exquisitely em- 
broidered with pearls and jewels. 

W. R. Staats and N. W. Bell of Pasadena, 
Wm. Garland and Rob Rowan of L03 Ange- 
les, acted as ushers presenting the guests, 
while Mr. Watson and King Macomber acted 
as representatives from the hotel. All of th«se 
gentlemen were decorated with red badges of 
honor. 

The Moral decorations were not lavish as 
the furnishings and decorations of the rooms 
were shown to better advantage by a splendid 
simplicity in this respect. Ferns, palms, car- 
nations and poinsettia were used, however, 
with admirable effectiveness in the rotunda, 
reception rooms, billiard and card rooms as 
well as in the long promenade afforded by the 
viaduct. 

The ball room was hung with raw silk 
draperies of red and green — the hotel colors, 
and further ornamented with Japanese lan- 
terns which shed a soft light over the brilliant 

scene. 

Twelve hundred guests were received be- 
tween the hours of seven and nine o'clock and 
later in the evening the splendid ball room in 
the west building and the old dancing hall 
were filled with dancers. Dainty souvenir 
programs were furnished ornamented with a 
cut of the newly completed hot -1 in gold. 

Music was furnished by Lowinsky and 
Schillinger in the respective ball rooms while 



Western Graphic 

a mandolin orchestra of six costumed Vene- 
tian girls was stationed midway in the prome- 
nade and discoursed sweet music. 

The dining room in the east building 
was thrown open at ninejo'clock and refresh- 
ments were served continuously until twelve 
o'clock. The menu included salads, sand- 
wiches, ices, confections and coffee. The din- 
ning room was prettily decorated with smilax 
and carnations, and the guests were served 
while seated in groups as fancy dictated. 

Los Angeles society was well represented 
and among the elegant toilets worn by the 
ladies of Pasadena and guests at Hotel Green 
were conspicuous those of several Los Angeles 
ladies, notably Mrs. Wm. Garland, who wore 
an exquisite gown of black velvet and jetted 
net; Mrs. T. E. Gibbon in a lovely combina- 
tion of black and white velours; Mrs. E. R. 
Killan, who wore an exquisite gown of yel- 
low and white Taffeta. 

As a social success the reception was not- 
able and Pasadena is to be congratulated up- 
on possessing such a magnificent hotel. That 
her citizens appreciate the public spirit and 
enterprise of Col. G. G. Green in building this 
mammoth hotel was abundantly evidenced by 
the manner in which the whole town turned 
out in gala day attire Monday evening to ex- 
press their appreciation and extend congratu- 
lations. 

The other social events of interest in Pasa- 
dena this week were the large reception given 
Wednesday afternoon by Mrs. George W. 
Stimson and the breakfast followed by cards 
given by Mrs. Henry Clay Durand Thursday. 

The reception was held from three to five 
o'lock and was attended by two hundred of 
Pasadena's society ladies. Mrs. Stimson was 
assisted in the reception of her guests by her 
cousin Mrs. Stutson, in whose honor the affair 
was given, and wore a handsome gown of 
rose brocade trimmed with point lace and dia- 
mond ornaments. Mrs. Stutson wore black 
net and diamond ornaments. The unbonneted 
ladies assisting were Mesdames Sherman, 
Morehous, Durand, Locke, and Miss Dur- 
and. 

The dining room was beautifully decor- 
ated with pink carnations and smilax and 
the table was ornamented with ferns and pink 
carnations arrayed on an exquisite Batten- 
burg centerpiece over pink satin. The draw- 
ing rooms were gay with poinsettia and potted 
plants. Music was furnished by a mandolin 
orchestra and the function was unusually de- 
lightful. 

Mrs. Simeon G. Reed of Orange Grove 
avenue entertained at cards Tuesday evening. 
The game was progressive euchre and prizes 
were won by Mrs. Sherman, E. H. May, Miss 
Lutz and Mr. Page Randall. At the conclu- 
sion of the game dainty refreshments were 
served. 



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In the Gay Life 

DR. AND MRS. F. R. FROST of West 
Twenty-third street entertained at din- 
ner Monday evening followed by a loge party 
at the Los Angeles Theatre. The guests were 
Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Moore of Alhambra, Miss 
Pattee Woodard of Chicago and Mr. Edward 
Saulisbury. 

Mr. and Mrs. \V r . L. Biese of Girard street 
entertained informally with cards and a sup- 
per Thursday evening. 

The Shakespeare Club met on Monday 
afternoon at the residence of Mrs. Kate Tup- 
per Galpin on Fremont avenue. Miss Mary 
E. Baldwin acted as hostess and gave readings 
from " Love's Labor Lost," followed by selec- 
tions and scenes from the play given by the 
members. Refreshments followed the discus- 
sion. In addition to the club members and 
alumni, there were some seventy-five guests. 

Mrs. Ira 0. Smith of West Adams street 
gave a large afternoon reception on Wednes- 
day. Assisting in receiving were Mrs. 0. H. 
Churchill, Mrs. J. Ross Clark, Mrs. F. M. Mc- 
Daniel, and Mrs. A. J. Salisbury. Mrs. E. L. 
Swain and Mrs. G. H. Freeman gave delight- 
ful readings and all the ladies guessing the 
number of fancy crackers in a handsome bis- 
cuit jar, Mrs. A. B. Manahan of Pasadena 
carrying off the same as the best calculator. 
Throughout the house potted plants, long 
stemmed roses, carnations and violets were 
lavishly arranged and cordons of smilax 
formed portieres and outlined the cornices and 
doorways. 

Mrs. Ira O. Smith entertains at cards 
Tuesday afternoon, the twenty fourth. 

The Ladies' Benevolent Society meets at 
the home of Mrs. Ducommun, 1347 Grand 
avenue, next Wednesday afternoon. 

Mrs. James C. Drake and Mrs. Randolph 
H. Miner have issued invitations for a large 
reception at the residence of the former on 
Hoover street, Thursday afternoon, the twen- 
ty-sixth. Four to six. 

Mrs. Clinton Norman Sterry of Wilshire 
boulevard gives a large "At Home" from 
three to six on the afternoon of Friday the 

Miss Nora Sterry and Norman Sterry will, 
in the evening, entertain with cards and 
dancing, 
twenty-seventh. 

The Midwinter Cotillion Club meets at 
Kramer's Hall next Tuesday night. 

It was a very pretty ceremony that on 
Wednesday night united Miss Mary Perry and 
William Bingham Nicholson at the St. John's 
church, the Reverend Taylor officiating. The 
decorations of the church were all in white 
and green. The bride's attendants were Miss 
Grace Perry, Miss Evangeline Perry and Miss 
Anna Jenkins,the best man Dr. Lewis Thorpe, 
and the ushers Dr. C. E. Rhone and Richard 
Sumner. Following the service a reception 
was given the bridal party by the groom's sis- 
ters Mrs. E. T. Wright and Mrs. M. J. Frick. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholson will be "at home" 
after February first at No. 515 West Thirty- 
sixth street. 

Mrs. Oliver P. Posey of South Figueroa 
street was the hostess at an elaborate lunch- 
eon given on Thursday. The decorations 
were in white and the varying mauve tones, 
the walls being draped with gauze and rib- 
bons, while adown the center of the table a 



Western Graphic 



16 



FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 

Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Entered at the postoffice in Los Angeles as second-class mail matter. 

LA Off O * .VVV^N.W rt ^v 

♦ A, OUlphur OpringS and Baths 



Oldest mid Largeat Bank In Southern 

California 



Farmers <S Merchants Bank SI 111 Oil Mal6T 



OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) 8500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 



Total 11,426,742 

OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

G. HEIMANN Assistant Cashier 



W. H. Perry 
O. W. Childs 
J. F. Francis 



DIRECTORS 

C. E. Thom A. (ilassell 

L W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 

H W. Hellman L W. Hellman 



f Wholesale 
J Butcher and 
a Packer 

J Telephone Main 155 

j 149-151-153 N. Spring Stre< 




• *»»> Cor. Macy and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St 

These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of 
Kidney and Liver complaints, Rheumatism, aud all Skin Affections. 

A. PUISSEGUR, Proprietor MES. L, LAEIEUX, Manageress 1 

THE HORSE SHOW 

a WILL BE HELD 

At LOS ANGELES 



FEBRUARY 1-2-3-4, i899_ 



*9~Speclal Collection Department. Oursafety 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent in its new fire and burglar proof va'ilt, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 

C F. IHMZEMIN] 

and Chemist 

222 N. Main St., Lanfranco Blk. 



All Breeds of Horses will be Kxhibited Handsome Turnouts 
Coaching Parades Hurdle Jumping Floral Parade Different Events Daily 

Afternoons at 2. Evenings at 8. Sale of Tickets commences Jan. 25, 1899, at Fitzgerald's 
Music Store, 113 S. Spring Sr. For all information address 



404 Byrne Building 



M. E. WOOSTER, Secretary 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



THE I^OSSlyil TheJ/ery Latest 



Main Street opp. Post Office 

The finest equipped Hotel at Moderate 
rates in 

LOS ANGELES 

140 Elegant Rooms— with steam heat, 
telephones, hot and cold running water, 
and light and air in every room. 

Electric Elevator, Continuous service. 
70 sunny suits with private baths. Super- 
ior dining room service. 

Kates American Plan S3 to S3 pei day 
Kates European Plan SI per day up 

Electric cars to depots and all points of interest 
Public and Private Parlors Orchestra music 
during dinner hours. 

ABNER L. ROSS, Prop. 



Wall Papers 



Three Carloads 



Walter Bros. 

627 so. spring street 
Tel. Main 1055 



Patents 



GoDUrirjhts 
H ade Marks 
Labels 



TOWNSEND BROS. 

Tel. Main 347 3JJ1-324 I'atoinac Block 
Broadway 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



Creamery Buildings* 

A NEW DEPARTURE 

IN CREAMERY CONSTRUCTION 

Write us for particulars.... 

Separators, Vats, Churns, or 

Anything you need 

To Make Butter or Cheese 
Spend one stamp on us. 

F. M. WILSON & CO. 

Selma, Clark Co., Ohio 



W. H. Perry, Pres. W. A. Morgan, Sec 

S. H. Mott, Vice-President. 

W. H. Perry 
Lumber 
and Mill Company 

Agents for the 

St. Paul and Tacoma Lumber Co., Tacoma, Wash 

■ffiffi MINING TIMBERS 

Correspondence Solicited 

136 Commercial St. Los Angeles. :al. 




THE BEST THING YOU CAN DO 
IS TO TRY A HOME REMEDY 

You have catarrh; perhaps you 
don't know it, but one bottle 
of the Mexican Calipornia 
Catarrh Cure will make a 
new head for you, and then 
you will know that you feel 
absolutely all right, so you 
must have had something like 

catarrh. Do not procrastinate; time is 
precious. See 

W. S. HALL, Sole Manufacturer- 

Home at Office 

1016 E. 32nd St. 471 Stowell Block 

Los Angeles So. Spring st* 



Nice Dry 
Oak and 
Juniper . , 



WOOD 



• Also COAL Delivered 

• Black Diamond - 910.00 

• Wellington - - 810.50 

• Special Prices by the Carload 



W. E. CLARK 

1248 SO. FIGUEROA 

Tel. West 69 



handsome strip of lace overlaid purple satin. 
A round mirror reflected a basket of hyacinths, 
violets and ferns, while posies of the flowers 
were at each cover. Bows and ends of rib- 
bons further adorned the table. The place 
cards were pretty Parisian conceits. About 
the hospitable board were Mesdames William 
Hook, C. N. Sterry, E. P. Clark, Ira O. Smith, 
John T. Jones, A. H. Naftzgar, Willard Stim- 
son, W. F. Bottsford, H. M. Sale, L. D. Sale, 
Margaret Hughes, Fanny Shoemaker, Jose- 
phine M. Butler and S. A. Van Gilson. In a 
guessing contest as to the number of violets 
used, Mrs. Naftzgar proved the best judge 
and was awarded a silver souvenir spoon. 

Mrs. 0. P. Posey of Figueroa street enter- 
tained with progressive whist yesterday after- 
noon. 

Mrs. Berthold Baruch of South Figueroa 
street gave a whist party of ten tables on 
Thursday afternoon to meet Mrs. Weiler and 
Miss Pauline Weiler of New York. The house 
decorations were all that could be desired, the 
soft shades of green in palm, fern, asparagus 
plumosus and smilax being accentuated by 
bold poinsettias, prim carnations, virgin cal- 
las and demure violets. The score cards were 
crescent-shaped with attached pencils oddly 
designed as keys, canes and guns and swing 
by baby ribbons. Wismer's orchestra and 
the catering of Christopher added much to 
the pleasure of the afternoon. The prizes 
were cut glass rose jars and a fancy silver 
lemonade spoon. 



Miss Ethel Mullins of ElLendale Place en- 
tertained on Thursday evening with "Old 
Maid Auction." About twenty young people 
participated, the maids, in quaint costume 
and disguise, being disposed of to the highest 
biddersjamong the youths. Refreshments closed 
the evening's pleasure. 

Miss Freda Hellman has returned from 
San Francisco where she has been extensively 
entertained. 

Mrs. J. E. Hooker and Miss Marion Hook- 
er of West Adams Street will leave for the 
east and Europe next month. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Skillman Murray 
(nee Olga Marix) of Salt Lake City will ar- 
rive in Los Angeles today on their wedding 
journey. 



Watches, Clocks a ". d >welry 

Carefully Repaired and Warranted 



Telephone 
...M 1159 



S- Conradi 

Optician, CQatcbtnakcr 

ft Mnd ft 



fine Diamond Setting 
H Specialty... 



113 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



A choice asiortment of Diamonds, Jewelry and Watches 
always on hand, 



Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Hinman of Dunkirk, 
N. Y., who have been spending the holidays 
with their daughter, Mrs. William M. Garland, 
on Adams street and at the Hotel Van Nuys, 
are now at the Hotel del Coronado. 

NOT1CK OK KOKKCLOSURK SAIjK 

Sheriff's Sale, No. 31,968. 
Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation), plaintiff', vs. Lizzie M. balton, 
defendant. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure ami sale. 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the JOth day of January, 
A.I)., 1899, in the above entitled action, where- 
in Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 

(a corporation) the above named plaintiff, 
obtained a Judgment and decree of foreclosure 
and sale against Lizzie M. Dalton, defendant on 
the 16th dav of January, A. D. 1899, for the sum of 
Three Hundred nnd Forty-three .t 10-100 (9848 10) 
Dollars, lawful money of the United States, 
which said decree was, on the JOtb day ol 
January, A. D 1899, recorded In Judgment 
Hook 82 of said Court, at page 12, I am com- 
manded to sell all the certain lot, piece, or 
parcel of land situate, lying and being in the 
countv of Los Angeles, state of California, ami 
bounded and described as follows: 

Lot Number One (1), block "A" of the Ninlh 
Street Tract Extension, as per map recorded in 
Book 55, pages 89 nnd 90 of Miscellaneous Rec- 
ords of said county of Los Angeles, together 
w itb the tenements, hereditaments and appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging, or in anywlscap- 
pertalning. 

Public notice is hereby given that on Tuesday, 
the 14th day of Kebruary, A. I). 1899. at 12 o'clock 
M . of that day, In front of the Court House door 
of the county of l.os Angeles, Hroadway entrance, 
I will, in obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with Interest 
and cost-, etc., to the highest and best bidder, 
for cash lawful money of the U. S. 

Dated this 20th day ol January, 1899. 

W. A. HAMM EL. 
Sheriff' of Los Angeles County 

By JOHN K. SLATER Deputy Sheriff. 

Miller h Brown, Attorneys for I'laintill. 




Major General Miles who was given the lie by Commissary 
General Eagan 



McCall's Patterns 10c and 15c 




Things New at Coulters 

The vast stocks are taking on a semblance of early spring. 
Many are the new things now being shown. Prominent among 
them are new embroideries. The display of these embraces all 
the very latest effects by clever makers. The Undermuslins for 
this year are coming in fresh and crisp as a spring morning. 
There is a dash and a style to them never attained in former 
years 

Piques and 1891) are identical. Everything will be pique this 
season. But we are well prepared. 

317=325 SOUTH BROADWAY 

Between Third and Fourth Street 



The Highest Limitations 

OF 

RICH CUT GLASS... 




HP HE finest produc- 
* tions of America's 
most famous factory- 
Perfect representations 
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rices — 
your table 



Pleased to Show You 



H. F. VOLLMER & CO. 

116 South Spring Street 



Sore Agents 
LIBBY'S CUT GLASS 



NEW FIRM 
NhW 

MANAGEMENT. 



City Dye and 
Cleaning Works 



345 




South Broadway 

We Use the Improved Dry Process and 
Clean Everything- from an . . . 

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made to look like new. 

Try Us Just Once 



"It looks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



Have Your Clothing- Cleaned 
Ready for Spring- 
Goods Called For and Delivered 
to any Part of City 

DURftND & MOFFITT, Props. 

TEL. CREEN 551 



WENDELL EASTON 
President 



GEORGE EASTON 

Vice-President 



GEO. D. EASTON 

Secretary 



ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK 
Treasurer 



WlOHRORfflGlm 



» 



W 1 - Estate Acct/rs A 



Be up to date and invest your money where it will bring quick 
returns. Invest in the most attractive part of the city, the 

MENLO PARK TRACT 

Large Lots. Streets Improved. Two Car Lines, but twelve minutes 
from business center. Nobby homes building in every block. 

It will pay you to call on us. 

EASTON ELDRIDGE & Co. 



121 SOUTH BROADWAV 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



?ress of leo. Rice & Sons (Inc.) 311 313 New Higb Street 



Western Graphic 



copy Righted ibbs 



-ylfi 1LLUSTRATM r ^JuE:KtT JOURNAL 



Volume VI. 
Number 4. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, January 28, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
10 Cents a Copy 




An Actual Southern California Scene in Mid-Winter 



Not from their snow crowned, shiveritig Alpine posts, 
Down gazing on the soft Italian coasts, 

On fairer land of bright e?ilrancing bloom, 
In longing , gazed the Carthaginian hosts. 

Oh, not beside the storied, castled Rhine, 
Such home of plenty hath the trailing vine, 

Low benditig 'neath its clustering burdens sweet, 
To lure the weary wanderer s feet, as thine. 




Not where Sorrento's golden glories gleam, 
Or soft Sicilia's dark-eyed daughters dream, 

Beneath the shade of si umbo in g /Una's bowers, 
Spread fairer groves, beside a brighter strea,-. 

Upspringing thickly from the sleeping plain, 
As sprang the hosts from proud Minerva's brain, 

In marshaled ranks, dim fading 'neath the gaze, 
Thy golden glories gleam — a fairy train. 

Albert Kercheval. 



Western Graphic 



SAD POET OF FRANCE 
Jehan Bights, Laureate of the Parsian 
Slums 

Jehan Rictus, the lean, sad poet of 
the Parisian "submerged tenth, " who is 
soon cotning to America, is very diffei 
ent from the usual poet of the hour. He 
is not a poseor. He does not come to 
lecture uor to give readings from his 
own poems He does not wish to make 
money — indeed could not afford to 
make money, for be would lose caste. 
He is and must always be poor. He is 
the poet of poverty — this lean, sad Je- 
han. 

The woes of the toiling masses appeal 
to him. He came from the streets. The 
streets have been his home,' and his life 
has been spent upon them. The streets 
of Paris! He sings of their grime and 
their music, of their laughter and their 
tears. For years he has been the mouth- 
piece of the Parisian street people. They 
pass tbrougii his plaintive poems in 
endless procession — gamins, flower girls, 
ragpickers, laborers, the poor and the 
wretched. In him they have found 
speech at last 

All Paris listened, wondering, to his 
«oug. When it first fell upon their ears, 
it struck them with a sort of shame. 
It was so plaintive, so real. The horde 
of thin and shabby poets was stricken 
with terror. Their own verses seemed 
suddenly to glare with affectation and 
strained nonsense. While they were 
being decadent and symbolistic, another 
man was being sincere. That which 
they had held to be pure gold was but 
tinsel. Their poems were paper flow- 
ers. His were burning red roses. Some 
of the horde wore furious, others thrust 
their own tinsel away from them and 
stooped to liarn from the lean, sad 
Jehan. 

And the people of the streets? They 
took Jehan to their hearts. He was their 
advocate. They gave him of their broad 
aud water. Those who could not read 
learned his songs by heart. They sang 
them everywbzre aud derived peace 
from them. They saug them on the 
street when they were out for a holiday. 
They sang them beating clothes at the 
wash and picking rags aud digging. 
They saug them sobbing by the little 
coffin with the four tapers at its head 
and feet. Jehan entered into their lives 
and became a part of their existence. 
Aud they were proud of him. 

His poems were published by a great 
publishing house. They were brought 
out in an inexpensive but beautiful edi- 
tion, with little colored drawings scat- 
tered all over the pages. Great people 
were anxious to take him up and lion- 
ize him. But he refused to be lionized. 
He refused to be rich. He was thu pen- 
pie's. He belonged to the toilers Ho 
would live nowhere but in his dear 
Latin quarter aud his dear slums. He 
would be shabby and free. He has an 
infinite trust in the toiling people, a be- 
lief in the beauty and generosity hidden 
away iu their breasts. Their affections, 
their griefs, their passions and suffer- 
ings never cease to move aud affect 
him. He sings a song for them in thiir 
own dialect of the streets, full of pretty 
terms aud keen slang. 

Not long ago some of the new rich 
people invited him to read several of his 
poems at a reception. He went. The 
house was brilliantly illuminated. 
There were women dressed in trailing 
silk, with glittering jewels flashing out 
against the white contour of their skins. 
There were young girls, new to society, 
tittering and laughing in corners. There 
were satyrlike old men leaning over the 
bare shoulders of beautiful women. The 
odor of patchouli intermingled with the 
exquisite fragrance of the flowers. There 
were young men about town strolling 
around in listless fashion — men who 
had never known what suffering and 
hardship mean. There was a buzz; of 
languid conversation between the inter- 
ludes of the music. 

Iuto this atmosphere came Jehan 
Rictus, the lean, sad poet of the sub 
merged. Fait women came forward to 
greet hirn, pleading with him to recite 



FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 

Western Graphic 



*"."'-> iiuMBAirn .miwvMimi.-\i ] 

Ml'3 writ re- <AOrf>usr*_^ ^ 

Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 
311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angelks, Cal. 
Entered at the postoffice in Los Angeles as second-class mail matter. 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. Single 
Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe, Per Copy Ten Cents. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

We Solicit Contributions of Short Stories and Articles of Interest about Southern 
California, which we will pay for at our regular rates The usual 
rules regarding Anonymous Contributions aud 
Rejected Mss. will be observed. 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



Bakery 



LEADVILLE BAKERY 



W. H Mayo, formerly at 826 W. Pico St., has re- 
moved to 546 S. Spring St. If not convenient 
for yon to call on us at our new place, 'please 
leave your street and number so our wagon 
can stop at your home. 

Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa' e mas- 
sage, HairdressiiiL'. Shampooing*, Human Hair 
Goods of all kinds. Titv ('heme de Acacia 
Skin food. 224-226 W. Second St. 

Bicvcles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

327 So. Spring St are selling the old reliable 
Hoffman and have added the Tribune (blue 
streak) to their line. Wheels from S25 00 up. 

Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULEY 

Bookbinder am! Blank Book Maker Magazine-, 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

1I5J4 N. Main St., Los Angei.es 



Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Make tine halftones, line ruts, embossing plates, 
newspaper cuts— just any hing you want en- 
graved. See them at the Times Building, Los 
Angeles. 



Grillework 



JNO. A. SMITH 



40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique aud artistic. 
707 S. BROADWAY. 



Kodak Supplies 
F. L 



DUNGAN 



Boots and Shoes 
H.C. 



BLANEY 



Boots and Shoes for Ladies, Gents. Mis-es, Boys, 
Children, and Infants. Prices reasonable. 

352 S. Spring St. Los angei.es 
Business College, 

y/O^asm^ M 

2Xo So. Spring St.. Los Angele", Cal. In session 
all the year students enter any day. 

Carpet Cleaning 

PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet. Ax. 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Rugs Sewing 
and tilting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. 6d South Broadway. Phone M. 217 
Robt. Jordan 

Dancing School 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL 

For Dancing 

The Glide system. A class will organize for be- 
ginners Wed. eve. Jan. 25. Residence 1022 S. 
Bonnie Bra \ Aciidemy sixth and Broadway, 
Illinois Hall. Los Angeles '1 el. Gkeen 12yl 



The most complete Stock in Southern Califor 
nia. First-c'.a-s Developing and Finishing our 
Specialty. 307 W. Foi rtii St., near Broadway. 

Printing 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

The largest and best equipped iu Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halftone and photo-chrome 
printing a specially. 

311-313 New High St. - Los Angeles 

Real Estate 

*' May in* tindH the bargains " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading Heal Estate Agents 

US West Fourth St - - Las Angeles 

Schoal of Shorthand 

The Great Shorthand Revolution 

Gregg's Light Line Shorthand 

Principles acquired in ten easy lessons. Students 
write 60 to So words a minute with five weeks' 
instruction. Institute B40}£ S Broadwav. 

Specialist 



J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon. Specialist for women 

Office hours: 9 to 12 M 2 to 5 and 7 to s P. M. 
Sundays. 10 to 12 M. 

s. Si'king St. - - Lot Angeles 



Trusses 



W. W. SWEENEY 



Dermatologist 

JOSEPHINE R0DD0N 

Shampooing and scalp treatment Bust and 
neck development a specialty. Medicated 
baths. Facial treatment. Agent for Mrs. Nettie 
Harrison's goods. 321 West Fourth St. 



•■"•^•^^••■^•''^•••^••fe'r^ 

i 




I Los Angeles 
I Pipe Organ Co. 

Ituilde s of 

Church 
..Concert.. 

And 

I Parlor Pipe Organs 

Factory: 
8th and San Pedro Sts. 
Los Angeles Tel. Qreen 1633 




Some of Uis beautiful verses. He repliv,.. 
iu a strange voice, "I wish to see a lit- 
tle more first." He wandered about the 
room, gazing with his large eyes curi- 
ously at the glittering throng. The 
whisper ran about the room that it was 
the poet. He looked at the light9, he 
looked at the flowers, he looked at the 
beautiful, vacant faces of the women. 
Finally he said simply, "I will now 
recite. " 

His tall, gaunt figure was outlined 
against tho rich curtains of amber satin. 
He commenced to speak. The satyrlike 
men aud the vacant faced women be- 
came interested. In an almost monot- 
onous voice he commenced to speak, 
aud, instead of the flowers aud the 
ligiited halls of the ballroom, they sud- 
denly saw the grimy Paris streets, 
where they weut up and down an end- 
less procession of faces white with evil 
and poverty. There was something in 
his dark, piercing eyes that made them 
uneasy. His monotonous voice became 
a reproach to them. He stopped abrupt- 
ly, as though suddenly comprehending. 
"Do you know," he said, addressing 
them directly, "that there are thou- 
sands of children in this city tonight 
who have not enough to eat? Yet you 
sit here in your tawdry trappings." 

Such is Jehan Rictus, the poet of the 
slums of Paris, the Burns of modern 
France, singing not of field mice, but of 
gutter rats. He is lean and sad. He has 
moved all Paris with his song, aud now 
he comes to see the American toiler, to 
mingle with the poor and the wretched 
of our own cities. He may be heard, he 
may see fit to speak to America, but be 
will not make money, for he does not 
speak iu epigrams, he does not write 
treatises, and, above all, he is hope- 
lessly sincere. — Washington Post. 



Expert maker and titter of Trusses, Elastic Hos- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. he only 
mnnufactur. r in s. cliforni i. Rtmember the 
number, 313 S. Spring St. Under Kamona 
Hotel. 

Undertakers 

BRESEE BROTHERS CO. 

Funeral Directors. Broadway and Sixth Sts. 

i riva e Ambulance. Lady Assistant. The best 

service a id the lowest prices. 
Tel. Main 243 - - - LosAngei.es 



Wood-Carpet 

JNO. A. SMITH 

81 25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
Floors, Strip lloors, etc. Cau be laid equally 
well in new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
aud permanent. 707 S. Broadway. 



( In-. It. Conrad 
Henry Wilhelni 

Pneumatic Electro Pneumatic _ 
Action and Pueumatic Couplers ¥ 
our Specialty. Organs 
rebuilt by the latest sys- 
tems. Special specifica- 
tions furnished on short 
notice. Organs taken care of 
by yearly contract. Piano 
and Organ tuning and 
repairing 



NOTICK OF FORECLOSURE SALE 

Sheriff's Sale, No. 31,963. 
Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation), plaintiff, vs. Lizzie M. Dalton, 
defendant. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale. 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 20th day of January, 
A. P., 1899, in the above entitled action, where- 
in Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a eirporation) the above named plaintiff, 
obtained a judgment and decree of foreclosure 
and sale against Lizzie M. Dalton, defendant, on 
the Ifith day of January, A. D. '.899, for the sum of 
Three Hundred and Forty-three & 10-100 (8343.10) 
Dollars, lawful money of the United States, 
which said decree was, on the 20th day of 
January, A. D 1899, recorded In Judgment 
Book 82 of said Court, at page 12. I am com- 
manded to sell all the certain lot, piece, or 
parcel of land situate, lying and being In the 
county of Los Angeles, state of California, and 
bounded and described as follows: 

Lot Number One (1), Block "A" of the Ninth 
Street Tract Extension, as per map recorded In 
Book f>f>, pages 89 and 90 of Miscellaneous Rec- 
ords of said county of Los Angeles, together 
w ith the tenements, hereditaments and appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging, or in anywise ap- 
pertaining. 

Public notice is herebv given that on Tuesday, 
the 14th day of February, A. D. 1899, at 12 o'clock 
M of that day, in front of the Court House dooi 
of the county of Los Angeles, Broadway entrance, 
I will, in obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure aud sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with interest 
and cost-, etc. , to the highest and best bidder, 
for cash lawful money of the U, S. 

Dated thiB 20th day'of January, 1899. 

W. A. HAMMKL. 
Sheriff of Los Angeles County 

By JOHN R. SLATER Deputy Sheriff. 

Miller .v Brown, Attorneys for Plaintiff. 



Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed Interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from $10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment oa mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

1 31 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VI. 
Number 4. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, January 28, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
lo Cents a Copy 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 



BEN. C. TRUMAN 



EDITOR 



THOSE legislators and journalists who 
are attempting to underestimate the 
men who fought through the last war and to 
undersize the results are getting themselves 
into a prodigious hole which they will soon 
have to pull in after them. The war that flew 
into the blood of the American people last 
spring is hard to get immediately out of the 
national system. Everything there is of ex- 
citement in the world concentrates itself in 
that greatest and- most spectacular of all 
games. For example, what is the devotion of 
a very king of football rooters to the team 
which represents his college in comparison 
with the thrill felt by every countryman of 
those brave fellows who strode up the hill at 
San Juan on that torrid day last July? Men 
will work and sing and write and play tor 
their school; they will fight and die for their 
country. It is the most elementary of all in- 
stincts, for it is the law of self-preservation 
presented in the most grandiose form; and, as 
it is the first, so it is the last, of them. With- 
out patriotism there is no country; without 
country, no home nor family. These things 
. are all taken as a matter of course in times of 
peace, but when the war cloud bursts they all 
take on a new fairness. This it is which gets 
in the arteries and makes the blood flow a lit- 
tle redder and a great deal faster. 

The death of Hon. Romualdo Pacheco in 
Oakland on Monday last removes an old citi- 
zen of honor and renown, who has served his 
state and country faithfully and well. He 
was a native Californian and one of the hand- 
somest men of our time, and he was as charm- 
ing in every way as he was handsome. No 
more gallant or courtly man has ever lived in 
this state. He had been lieutenant governor 
and governor of California, Member of Con- 
gress from this district, minister to Guatemala, 
and had served in other lesser official capac- 
ities. It is a curious fact that the deceased 
was elected lieutenant governor by one major- 
ity and was also once elected Congressman by 
one majority. 

It is not from the intentionally wicked that 
the world suffers the most. Torquemada be- 
lieved that he was working the salvation of 
hia fellow men; Robespierre thought he was a 
philanthropist; and to multiply examples, J. 
Noonan Phillips regards himself as a perfect- 
ly good and harmless man. Thus, it is not 
strange that a device which threatens to add 
many fold to the oppressive burdens of life 
should come from one whose mission is peace 
— a clergyman has invented a process which 
will photograph sound and then reproduce 



tht original sound from the photograph. In 
other words he proposes to load the family 
photograph album with limitless potentialities 
of vocal as well as of visual distress. Who 
has not looked over the ancestral collection of 
which all well legulated households boast and 
reflected that, after all, they had one redeem- 
ing feature — they couldn't talk? Now, this 
well meaning preacher will take away that 
one tolorable circumstance, for there is no 
genuine family album which does not contain 
the counterfeit presentment of faces that no 
sane person would feel safe in the neighbor- 
hood with if he knew that their conversation 
as well as their aspect might be reproduced to 
him at any moment. Therefore, let some mil- 
lionaire who might fritter away his money on 
pretentious tombstones buy this dreadful in- 
vention and destroy it for the benefit of man- 
kind. 



fire him so hard that when he strikes he will 
never know "where he is at." 



It begins to look as if Miles and Eagan 
and Shatter and Breckinridge were not the 
only ones that are calling each other hard 
names — indeed there are good many newspap- 
er men and legislators in Sacramento saying 
hard things of each other. Why not let the 
president of our Athletic Club go up to Sacra- 
mento and arrange a meeting — the essential 
features to be ten rounds with ten-pound 
megaphones? 

Under General Wood's vigorous treatment 
Santiago has almost wholly recovered from 
the manana habit. 



There is no doubt but that all who voted 
for President McKinley in 1896 because he 
iepresented the best interests of the country* 
and not because he was of their poliVcal way 
of thinking, are perfectly satisfied that they 
did right and that they have seen certain 
promises fulfilled. No surer indication of 
said fulfillment can be presented than the 
ever-increasing volume of bank clearances 
which seem to go on like the river. It is esti- 
mated that something like 90 per cent, of all 
of our commercial transactions is done 
through the banks and an increase or decrease 
in the aggregate of clearing shows whether 
business is expanding or contracting. To be 
sure, increase in the business of banks may 
sometimes be spasmodic, but the expansion 
during the past twenty months has been regu- 
lar and gradual, showing a feeling of security 
and confidence that is the best possible evi- 
dence of improved business conditions and 
prospects. We have yet to meet a democrat 
not a professional politician that voted 
for Mr. McKinley in 1896" who is not 
proud of his act, and there are not many in 
Southern California that did not vote for Mr. 
Gage and who will experience some nausea 
should they file back into their old party. 

The telegrams from Washington for more 
than a week asseverate that Secretary Alger 
will be censured. Censuring such a creature 
as this man Alger reminds one of the censur- 
ing of unruly boys in the old school days of 
fifty years ago — anything less than a censure 
administered at the end of a birch rod or a 
rattan made the young rogues smile up their 
sleeves. So with this scamp Alger. The only 
censure that should be administered to him 
should be a request for his resignation. He 
has been a disgrace to .the cabinet since the 
start and should never have been forced upon 
the President. His career in the army should 
have precluded the possibility of his becom- 
ing the head of the War Department, for he 
was a skulker and a deserter, who managed to 
obtain sick leaves and then loaf around hotels 
awya from gun, powder and ball. He is a 
failure in everything but making money and 
an upstart that has paid his way into society 
and into political place and power. The only 
correct way to censure Alger is to fire him and 



Congressman Carmack of Tennessee com- 
pares President McKinley to " Nero, Machia- 
velli, and all other classic bogies.*' If the ter- 
rified Carmack will only read up he will con- 
clude that neither Mack nor the great fiddler 
was a bogy man. But there is no doubt but 
the Tennessee Congressman is. 

Chauncey M. Dei-ew has been elected 
U.S. Senator from New York; and if his states- 
manship shall have been as pronounced as his 
executive and legal management of the Van- 
derbilt systems of railways, he will have filled 
the position quite as acceptably as anyone 
from the Empire State since Conklin and 
Fenton of twenty-five years ago. As a post- 
prandial orator he will have ample time to 
expand over the gastronomic processions of 
canvasbacks, bivalves and Pseudemys rubri- 
ventris of Chesapeake bay. 



Nevada has again elected Mr. Stewart to 
the Senate, and it did a very smart thing for 
Nevada because no new man could do so much 
for Nevada as Senator Stewart. It may not 
be generally known that Stewart is the author 
of the 14th amendment and has given other 
evidences of statesmanship. He is the only 
man in the Senate that was there thirty years 
ago, but his membership has not been contin- 
ual. 

The man who can square the circle has 
an easy job compared to the statesman who is 
called upon to explain why he favors the 
adoption of the peace treaty in one breath 
and argues against national expansion in the 
next. 



We had a pleasant visit from that fine 
actor and charming fellow, McKee Rankin, 
one day during the week. There is not a 
millionaire in America who looks half so well 
fed and happy as does our old time friend, 
and we doubt if there iB a coupon cutter in 
the land anywhere near so entertaining — for 
McKee Rankin has been in many lands, in- 
cluding all over Europe, Mexico, Cuba, Can- 
ada, Hawaii, and parts of Asia and Africa, 
and has observed closely, and of course intel- 
ligently, and has the happy faculty of express- 
ing himself felicitously regarding what he 
has seen. While not "aged," as we some- 
times say of horses, he was on the stage away 
back when Charlotte Cushman played Meg 
Merriles and Hamlet, when Forrest played 
Damon and Coriolanus, and when the elder 
Booth played Iago and Richard and Mrs. 
Farren Parthenia and Pauline. 



4 



Western Graphic 



A LOS ANGELES MAN IN CUBA 

THE following is a continuation and con- 
clusion of the article by Thomas D. 
Mott, Jr., the first part of which was pre- 
sented to our readers last week. It will be 
found to be a most graphic and interesting 
description of a section that is full of kaleido- 
scopic pictures and other entertaining fea- 
tures: 

* * * At seven o'clock Thursday morn- 
ing we reached Guananamo bay. Here we 
stopped until Friday evening as the ship had 
quite a large cargo to discharge and some to 
take on board. The most interesting point 
hereabouts was the ruins of a Spanish fort or 
rather block house upon a small island called 
Cayo Torro and commanding the entrance to 
the inner harbor. This fort was so well and 
effectively shelled by the Marblehead and 
Texas during the war that only portions cf 
the walls are now standing. These have large, 
gaping holes through which a horse can be 
driven, showing the effect of shells fired at a 
distance of seven miles. Here I saw large 
cannon of bronze metal which had been 
brought from Havana during the war to aid 
in the defence of this place; but only two 
were ever put in place and none were fired. 
They are about to be shipped to the United 
States as trophies of war. These cannon are 
about seven feet long and weigh three tons 
each. In accordance with an ancient Spanish 
custom each piece has a name engraved ufon 
it. There was the "Helemundo" cast in 
A.D. 1788, the " Conde de Estevan " cast in 
1847, the "Mansajero" cast in 1787, and the 
" Emiliano" cast in 1788, beautiful pieces 
truly but scarcely effective against modern 
guns. 

We left Guantanamo bay at four o'clock 
in the afternoon of Friday. As we passed 
from the inner bay into the outer harbor we 
saw the cruiser Cincinnati and the supply 
ship Glacier gracefully riding at anchor. 
When well out from the coast the captain 
slowed the engines as he could not enter San- 
tiago harbor until daylight the next morning 
and we had only forty miles to go. 

Naturally I was anxious to be up early 
next morning to see the beautiful entrance to 
the harbor of which I had heard so much, and 
also the famous Morroand fortifications which 
had held our navy at a respectful distance for 
so many days. Six o'clock found me on deck. 
The day was just breaking and out toward 
the eastern horizon dawn was appealing clad 
in rosy garb. There was yet the smell of 
freFhness in the air and the evening dew still 
bathed with gentle touch the bosom of the 
earth and sea. Sunrise in the tropics, at least 
as I saw it then, is something marvelously 
grand. It must have been some ancient sun- 
rise which formerly inspired the ancients to 
picure the dawn as a maiden wondrously fair 
and the sun as her lover. 

The Morro lies to the right of the chan- 
nel as we enter. That massive fortification, 
grim and ancient in appearance and con- 
struction, looked yet more grim in the solemn 
stillness of that early hour. At first sight it 
appears to be a series of walls reaching from 
the top of the hill to the water's edge. But 
as you pass it the massive proportions of its 
battlements are clearly discernible and you 
see that it is something more than mere walls; 
it is a perfect fortress. Apparently the only 
damage done by the terrible rain of thirteen- 
inch shells and the more terrible discharges 
of the Vesuvius which caused the earth to 
tremble for miles around was nothing more 
than the side of a tower carried away and a 
corner of a wall broken off. Then it is that 
one marvels at the solid masonry and is filled 
with wonderment at this old fortification built 
almost in medieval time and according to 
medieval plans. Truly impregnable and in- 
destructible has it proven itself, this Morro. 
I will venture to guess that no contractor 
raked off a big profit in its construction. The 
days of jobs had not yet appeared 

Near the Morro on the channel side is the 
wreck of the Reina Mercedes, a Spanish 



cruiser of the old type. One side projects out 
of the water and so close do you pass to it 
that it seems you could almost jump on 
board. At a distance of some three hundred 
feet up the channel lies the Merrimac, an elo- 
quent record of American courage and in- 
trepid daring, a monument to Hobson's eter- 
nal fame and that of the brave fellows who 
accompanied him on his fearful mission. 

I can imagine no more beautiful entrance 
to a harbor than this one. I have always 
been proud of our famous " Golden Gate," but 
this has won from me the reluctant admission 
that in point of beauty California has no port 
to equal it. This is so exceedingly pictur- 
esque, that there is no heart so sordid, no 
mind so mean or dull or prosaic, no soul so 
critical, but must be touched and moved and 
enraptured as the eye dwells upon the won- 
derful combination of color and outline. The 
channel at the entrance is so narrow that you 
can throw a stone to either shore as the ship 
passes in. Slowly and cautiously it moves as 
if feeling its way between the banks of what 
is really a winding and narrow river. These 
banks are covered with a luxuriant vegetation 
and stately palms and graceful banana trees. 
In the distance of three-quarters of a mile 
the channel makes a perfect letter " S," and 
so we wind in and out under a gorgeous bower 
of tropical growth until we enter the large 
bay. It seems as though each change of scene 
affords fresh opportunity for admiration, and 
when well into the harbor a new and pretty 
picture came into view. There to the front 
but a little to the right was the city of San 
tiago, with its low houses and red tiled roofs 
contrasting beautifully with the vegetation 
surrounding the town and the tall verdant 
mountains which form the background. The 
city is built on a gentle mountain slope and 
is ideally located being comparatively easy to 
drain. 

The people here are divided into two 
classes, the negroes and the whites. The for- 
mer though ignorant are very tractable; the 
latter are scciable, extremely hospitable and 
decidedly intelligent. My views concerning 
these people have been considerably changed; 
the papers in the United States have scarcely 
done them justice, and have served rather 
more to misguide than to inform. It would 
be hardly fair to judge our own Southern peo- 
ple by the negroes; neither should we follow 
that rule in forming our estimate of the Cuban. 
At the landing I looked about for the naked 
children, but failed to find them; through the 
city I walked and still saw none until I got to 
the "por" quarters. In the country more of 
this is seen but the children are scarcely more 
than infants. Thpre has been exaggeration 
in the reports concerning this subject as, in- 
deed, of a great many others, for I am told 
even by army people that the number of 
naked children was no greater when the 
Americans first arrived. Army officials and 
Cubans alike complain of the correspondents; 
I assure you that little dependence is to be 
placed upon the newspaper reports. I remem- 
ber a private communication which also men- 
tioned the "naked children." In this regard 
as also in one other point the author was, to 
put it mildly, what in the vernacular is called 
"away off." In a conversation with me he 
treated the "facts" as being different from 
those given in the letter, not knowing that I 
had read what he had written. I have visited 
the church or cathedral and attended services 
there last Sunday. I had expected to walk 
into a place of sumptuous elegance, but lo, be- 
hold ! the only thing decent about it was the 
floor of marble squares, which every house 
h 're has, and the altar. It is a large building 
with the usual high ceiling but there are any 
number of edi6ces there that far surpass it for 
beauty or elegance. St. Patrick's in South 
Bend or your own church building is a palace 
compared with it. Alas, the evidences of 
"where some of the blood money went to " 
were not to be seen; they had disappeared 
like all weak creatures of a not too scrupu- 
lous imagination. The church here was not 
supported by the people directly, but by the 



government, which paid the Archbishop and 
the priests their salaries amounting to $18,000 
yearly. This sum paid all church expenses 
in the archdiocese. 

I find most of the houses here two »tories 
in height, people conducting their business on 
the ground floor and living above. There are 
no front yards, the houses immediately abut- 
ting on the sidewalks, and having in the center 
a large court around which the house is con- 
structed. All rooms open out upon this court 
making the house much cooler. 

The sidewalks are about two feet in width 
and the streets are about twice as wide as the 
alley leading to Maud's stable. They present 
a very monotonous appearance as there is no 
variety in the architecture of the buildings. 

I find the Americans busily engaged in 
rocking the cradle of this infant nation. Gen. 
Wood is doing wonders and is universally 
praised by the Cubans, who highly esteem 
and greatly admire him. I paid him a visit 
and found him a very genial gentleman. We 
had a social chat and upon my departure I 
was asked to call again in a few days. 



HOW A FINE MIND BECAME UNBALANCED. 

AFTER RICHARD HARDING DAVIS 

PALLID was his multvm in parvo brow! 
Paroxysms of knee deep fright threw 
his noble bicycle-accident features into the 
convulsions of an awful fear. Before his muy 
mucho malo eyes swam a mist of yellow, and 
behind him was a chaotic mob of raveled- out 
hankerings after something that carried with 
it a per annum district attorneyship or a per 
diem senatorship or any other old sinecure 
that had a 16 to 1 gilt-edged, remunerative 
string adroitly attached to it. 

He gazed frantically up Temple, then up 
Main, then down Spring; then he clutched 
aimlessly at his inside overcoat pockets, and 
then he gasped faintly and then broke out in 
a wild delirium of harsh, feverish, Silver Re- 
publican laughter: 
"Ha! ha!" 

The little policeman on the corner was 
panic-stricken but never for a moment forget- 
ting his business of letting bicycles and cars 
rush past like lightning and of threatening 
all owners of quadrupeds who were jogging 
along at a funeral gait. 

" Ha ! ha ! " 

The little policeman advanced toward the 
seemingly demented man, who shrieked: 

" Death ! deep, dark, dank death I Cres- 
cendos of abysms of nothingness and Long 
Beach side entrances ! And I ! So young I 
My eyes ! I see a coward's heart, all striped 
with yellow and pink polka dots and criss- 
crossed with vermilion centers. Ah ! I hear 
the death song and the demon rattles away 
down the whole length of my poor elon- 
gated throat. There is a pounding in my 
ears like the hammeringdown of a picturesque 
Harper tract record — a scream, a howl, a lurid 
screeching like that of a crimson-stained 
skeleton with a jumping toothache and com- 
plications of Pasadena grippe, neuralgia and 
too much rara avis sesamoid. lean see Batty's 
bears I I can see " 

"Say!" ejaculated the Herculean custo- 
dian of the Trafalgar square of Los Angeles, 
who had just had an altercation with an al- 
falfa ranchero whose nose was on the run, 
"what's the matter with you, anyway ?" 

" What must be, must be," he replied more 
serenely; "even though the entire astronomi- 
cal and ethnological " 

" See here ! " cried the Colossus of the 
roads near Temple Block, "what in the world 
is the matter ? " 

" Matter ! matter ! You sublime little 
idiot ! I'm from Pasadena 1 There comes 
my car and I've forgotten to have mv flask 
refilled I " 



Western Graphic 



5 



A CHAMPION HUNTER 

BY ELIZABETH A. VORK 

HE is from the north, he is young in 
years as well as in some other things, 
and he is, according to his own account of 
things, a champion deer hunter. 

One does not know that his express mis- 
sion to Southern California was for the pur- 
pose of teaching its masculine inhabitants all 
about deer, but one received a vague impres- 
sion that such was the case, after listening to 
his conversation on the subject. 

"When you are ready to go deer hunting, 
he would say benevulently, "just let me know 
about it. I'm the fellow to plunk 'em every 
time. Holy man alive! I've shot more deer 
up north than your Sierra Madre mountains 
can trot out." 

No one contradicted him. The people of 
Southern California are nothing if not polite, 
and so he went gamboling along the green 
pastures of his verdant imagination, unre- 
strained. 

A few weeks ago he ran up against an old- 
timer, who has been in the habit of going up 
into the mountains on an annual deer hunt 
every consecutive year of his life for twenty 
years. He listened to the effervescent babbling 
of this northern Nimrod with a dry smile. 
When he had received all the valuable knowl- 
edge that gracious philanthropist desired to 
impart he eyed the dapper youngster from 
head to foot and said laconically: "Young 
man, I go for my annual deer hunt next 
week. I have asked two friends to go with 
me, an' if you want to join us, out of courtesy 
to your superior knowledge, an' owin' to the 
fact that you air a visitor to our part of the 
state, we will give you the first shot." 

The young man accepted the invitation 
with great enthusiasm. 

The opportunity came to distinguish him- 
self shortly after they reached the mountains. 
A deer was discovered browsing quietly on the 
opposite side of a small open space, and 
slowly making its way toward them. The 
hunters crept cautiously around within easy 
shot and waited. 

"S — h! Now young feller get your gun 
ready," whispered the old hunter. 

A moment later the deer, a fine buck, 
came loping at a deliberate pace through the 
opening in the brush. There never was a 
finer opportunity for a sure aim. But no re- 
port broke the stillness. 

"Fool!" muttered the old hunter, "why 
don't he shoot?" He moved his head 
cautiously and looked at the enthusiastic 
Nimrod. 

The champion deer hunter's mouth stood 
open, his eye3 were glued upon the magnifi- 
cent animal. As he saw it disappearing, he 
deliberately lowered his gun, and pointing 
a trembling finger at it, said in an awe-struck 
voice: 

"There— it— goes!" 

"And by gum!" said the old hunter al- 
most tearfully, in relating it; "it did go, too. 
He lost the purliest shot fate ever wasted on a 
stag-struck fool!'' 

A PHILOSOPHER OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

THERE was a time," began Hesekiah 
Turnipseed, as he deftly extracted an- 
other prune from the village grocer's stock, 
that the word "fake" was scarcely in vogue, 
but those times have long since past; the age 
in which we now live is as full of "fakes" as a 
sugar coated pill is of bitterness, and unless a 



man sleeps with both, or at least with one eye 
open, he has no more show to get up in the 
world than a cut- tail steer has in fly- time. 

We are all familiar — some of us from pain- 
ful experience — with the green goods fake, the 
three shell game, the lighting-rod bluffer, the 
smooth agent with all of the worlds' knowl- 
edge tmbodied in an encyclopedia of innumer- 
able volumes, on easy payments, the estate-in- 
Europe liar, the courtesy fake to run for office 
at the earnest solicitation of many friends, 
the bewhiskered gold brick fake, the fake of 
naming children after rich relatives, and so 
on and so on. 

I say we are all familiar with these traps; 
they are all old indeed and have become 
threadbare from so much use, and are capa- 
ble of practicable demonstration with no one, 
except possibly the class of hay makers that 
"blow out the gas," and they don't usually 
livelong enough to be very profitable to tha 
class of humanity that thrive by tutoring 
their untutored fellow countrymen. But of 
late years one bumps up against fakes of such 
a high order that he don't know afterwards 
how it all came to pass, in fact they are so 
scientific and so artistic that they rope in the 
high-browed and purse-proud class of people 
who are in the habit of making fun and 
laughing immoderately at the gullibility of 
their country cousins. 

These schemes are worked up to the keen- 
est point of perfection and then presented by 
an agent who has a way of telling funny 
stories, predicting rain, chucking the children 
under the chin ; in short, making you think 
he is your long lost best friend and as a friend 
bringing to your attention a gilt-edge, silk- 
covered proposition that only a limited num- 
ber will be allowed in on, calling it possibly a 
"scientific discovery" — the result is a depre- 
ciated bank account of the victim. Others 
are brought to our attention in the shape of 
cards, circulars, dodgers and such like, la- 
belled "fads," and are snatched up with the 
avidity with which a fond mother grabs her 
long lost child. But no matter in what guise 
they are decorated they are all fakes, simon- 
pure and simple. One of the latest is the fake 
of "Superiority of Mind over Matter;" for in- 
stance, the victim is told to rub a loaf of bread 
over his abdomen and then believe he has had 
his dinner, thereby saving the price thereof, 
for which secret he pays a very handsome 
fee. Then we have the fake of family trees 
and coats-of-arms for persons rich in skads but 
poverty stricken in gray matter — and the fake 
of fashion which alters the shape of garments 
as often as a woman changes her mind. The 
fact is we are in an age of fakes, and I might 
even add that "marriage" is-er-er "what's 
that Sarah? yes, I'll be right" along." As I 
was saying marriage is a kind of lottery, but 
the subject is too deep for discussion just now. 
In the line of my previous remarks, however, 
I will say, in conclusion, that fakes and traps 
and swindles are so numerous nowadays that 
a man has to set with both feet tucked under 
him to keep from getting "his legs "pulled." 

C. Bob Syer. 



OUR NATIONAL PROGRESS. 

We Will Become the Naval Nation of the Earth. 

JUST as the Louisiana purchase in 1803 
made America a steamboat nation, and 
just as the acquisition of California in 1848 
made America a railway and telegraph na- 
tion, so the acquisition of Hawaii and Porto 
Rico and, above all, of the Philippines, in 
1898, must make America the naval nation of 
the earth, says the National Geographic Mag- 
azine; for the problem born of the accession 
would be that problem of navigation which 
needs American genius for its final solution, 
while America needs the incentive to 
strengthen that element in which alone she is 
weak. The Phillippines are remote — only a 
fraction so remote in time as was California a 
half-century ago, yet remote enough to compel 



the invention of devices for shortening time 
and annihilating space; and the problem of 
bringing Manila within a fortnight of San 
Francisco is one worthy the genius of the in- 
ventors of the innumerable devices involved 
in steamboating, railroading and telegraph- 
ing. Given swift vessels, the other problems 
presented by the garden of the east are of little 
consequence, save as forecasting directions for 
the profitable expenditureof long-pentenergy ; 
the 7,000,000 pastoral natives and tax-gather- 
ing Spaniards are a far less menace to our 
quadrupled population and multiplied power 
than were the savage tribes and resident Mex- 
icans of California; while it is the special 
function of the republican form of govern- 
ment to render the inhabitants of acquired 
territory not only self-supporting but self- 
governing. 

The progress of mankind may be measured 
by advance in speed of locomotion, beginning 
with fleetness of foot, coming up through 
tleetness of ridden and driven animals and 
ending with swiftness of locomotive engines 
and seagoing craft; and, with vessels of suffi- 
cient swiftness and projectiles of sufficient 
velocity, there need be little fear of foreign 
complications, little occasion for maintaining 
great navies; for, if commercial competition 
be but aroused, individual effort may be 
trusted to develop the devices required for 
national protectisn. 

$TRADE MARKS OF ROYALTY. $ 

MDE ROYER, gives an "incomplete" 
• list of members of the French "nobil- 
ity" who have taken to themselves American 
wives. He leads off with the Due de Choiseul 
Praslin, who married Miss Mary Elizabeth 
Forbes, with a dowry of $1,000,000. He states 
that Miss Clara Coudert brought the marquis 
de Choi-eul $250,000 and that Zefita Heyward 
(comtesse de Gallatan) took $200,000 as a 
dowry to the Comte Guy de Rohan-Chabot. 
The other Americans who have married into 
the noble faubourg, with their dowries, are 
given by M. de Royer as follows: Duchess 
Decazes (Isabelle Blanche Singer), $2,000,000; 
Duchesse de Dino, "widow of Levington [sic] 
Stevens," to quote M. de Royer, brought her 
husband $7,000,000; marquise de Mores (Me- 
dorah Hoffman), $500,000; Comtesse Boni de 
Castellane (Anna Gould), $15,000,000. 

NO REVOLUTION IN KENTUCKY. 

THE world returns to its accustomed equi- 
librium. The wholesale raid on the 
pool rooms of Louisville, Ky., was not the 
sign of a frightful social convulsion in the 
blue-grass state. It was simply the freak of 
an irrepponsible person who happened to be 
foreman of a grand jury. The judge before 
whom the cases were brought promptly dis- 
charged all the prisoners, lectured the grand 
juryman and properly denounced the raid as 
"the greatest outrage on personal liberty ever 
known in Louisville." 
We should say sol 

If it comes to the pass that a man is not at 
liberty to run a poolroom in Kentucky, where 
will the Goddess of Liberty herself find a nook 
in which she may reasonably expect to be 
secure? It goes back of the Declaration of In- 
dependence; for ages before it was dreamed 
that all men were created free and equal it 
was fully recognized in Kentucky that horse- 
racing and all that pertains thereto consti- 
ted a sanctuaried occupation in which a man 
might not be disturbed. 



6 

T^own ITalk and prattle 

IT ill becomes a great nation like the United 
States, boasting a free school system 
second to none in the world and many other 
institutions calculated todiffuse needful knowl- 
edge, that the citizens of a large and pros- 
perous city should be left in ignorant help'ess- 
ness respecting one of the most common of 
evils. 

We t^ach our children arithmetic that 
they may know how to make change while 
bucking against the nefarious slot machines; 
we teach them natural history that they may 
be armed against the man who would show 
them where Poker Davis has his fascinating 
little games; and political history that they 
may have their eyes open when buying Con- 
federate currency; and, yet, to our shame be 
it said, we have made no comprehensive effort 
to enlighten our strangers as to the danger 
which in a way comprehends all those enu- 
merated above. 

For instance, a gentleman from Philadel- 
phia arrived here a few weeks ago and put up 
at one of our leading hotels. He was war- 
ranted to be of high commercial and social 
standing. But he hadn't been in the hotel 
but a few moments when an inclination seized 
him to go out on a bat, whatever that means, 
and he went up to First street near Los An- 
geles and began to fill up on tarantula whis- 
key until he became confused in his intellect- 
uals and lost all his money. And when he 
came to his senses he explained that he knew 
nothing about liquor and had been astounded 
by the effect it produced. 

His innocence of liquor, which is the uni 
versal condition in Philadelphia and Pasa- 
dena, is a beautiful and admirable thing so 
long as the inhabitants of those places sta) T 
at home, but every now and then one of them 
comes to Los Angeles, or some other wicked 
place, and starts out to engulph himself in 
high balls and rock and rye. Knowing only 
Schuylkill or Altadena water he drinks with- 
out one thought of harm and afterward under- 
goes many peculiar and painful experiences. 
Now I would suggest to Chief Glass that, as 
an adjunct to his other system of duties, he 
give some lectures for adults, explaining the 
deleterious effects of Los Angeles whiskey, so 
that any Philadelphian or Pasadenan who 
comes here may recognize its dead sure work 
and shun it as he would a poor relation. 

These are ideal Southern California days 
— and nights, too, for that matter. And 
among all the beautiful ways to spend a day, 
or a half day and evening, none can fully 
compare to the trip to Santa Monica by the 
Electric Railroad. Barley and grass give an 
emerald hue all along the way and checker 
the freshened hillsides, and delicate wild 
flowers peep bashfully out in little patches 
here and there. Santa Monica is perfect these 
lovely winter days, the breezes from the sea 
coming laden with rt freshing elixirs that put 
to blush many of the solutions and embroca- 
tions of apothecary and seer. The sunsets 
are always entrancing, with their crimson 
banners and ethereal drapery and canopy of 
azure and gold. To the lover of aerial scenery 
descriptions of these celestial phenomena can 
never be overdrawn. To the disciple of Wal- 
ton we would impart the solemn fact that 



Western Graphic 

fishing is again good off the new wharf. And 
to the gastronome, and particularly to the 
lover of an occasional ichthyological repast, 
Roberto Eckerto, I would gently say, is back 
from the thermal vapors of Elsinore, ruddy 
of skin and nature, and always ready to serve 
those viands that are supposed to add gray 
matter to cerebellum and tissue to body and 
limb. 

The Sunset Club had its regular monthly 
dinner at Jerry Illich's last evening, an d the 
famous caterer of Third street made his guests 
feel happy over a menu that would have 
made many banquets ashamed of themselves. 
More than an average crowd was present, in- 
cluding all the railroad fellows, as Charles 
Monroe was to read a paper entitled " Popu- 
lar Prejudices Against Railroad Companies," 
and which proved to be able, interesting and 
comprehensive. There were other speakers, 
and at one time it looked as if there were two 
s des essaying to pass each other on the same 
rail — raillery being r fe throughout the hours 
devoted to the literary part of the program. 
The annual election ot officers took place and 
of course Frtd L. Alles was re-elected secre- 
tary and Louis F. Vetter treasurer. To be 
sure there were the usual charges made against 
these two fiduciary despots, but they were 
unanimously selected to rob such innocents as 
J. .1. Byrne, J. A. Muir, and others who are 
not always in favor of standing all the traffic 
will bear. 

Bi.ly Rowland of Puer.te and Isaac Lord 
of Ioamosa make many journeys a month be- 
tween their homes and Los Angeles and de- 
clare they hardly ever make a trip that some- 
thing funny or dramatic does not occur. The 
smart Aleck is often abroad with the new 
catches. Almost always someone will bite. 
George W. Burton was on the train the other 
day and bought an evening paper. All of a 
sudden he cried out: "My, that's awful; the 
great Sousa loses his life by drowning! " 
"Where?" "How?" came from a dozen 
voices. "He was playing 'On the Banks of 
the Wabash ' and fell in and was — " and 
then the shout that was expected went up 
from suckers and all. The same afternoon a 
bluffer from Bluff ville sought to do the crowd: 

" Look here now, but I'm a bluffer from 
Bluffville, and I want to wake this crowd up. 
I've had it poked at me that the world was 
round. I don't believe it. I believe it's as 
flat as a pancake, and here's money to bet on 
it. It's even up for $250 that the world is 
flat." 

" I couldn't bet with you," quietly replied 
Professor Swift, the man addressed. 

" Oh, you back down, do you? " 

" No, sirl I don't, but I happen to believe 
with you that the world is flatter than that. 
I'll also bet $250 that it is." 

The bluffer looked hard at him for a 
minute and then passed on to the next man 
and said: 

"It's generally believed that the Bible is 
an inspired book. I don't believe that it is, 
however, and I'll bet you $300 to $150 you 
can't prove that it is." 

" My friend," said Burt Estes Howard, as 
he looked up. " I'll give better odds than you 
offer. I'll bet five to one that it isn't in- 
spired." 

" You don't believe it then? " 

"Of course not." 

The bluffer seemed disappointed but passed 



on to the next, who was half asleep; be patted 
him on the shoulder and said: 

"Does the sun move around the earth or 
the earth around the sun?" 

" What do you ask me for? " was sleepily 
queried by my friend Lord. 

" Because I'll bet you $250 even up the sun 
moves around the earth. Everybody but me 
believes the other way, but here's my money 
to back my opinion." 

'• Put it up, my friend — put it away! Any 
man who says the sun doesn't move around 
the earth is a blasted fool ! I've seen it on 
the move myself and have money to bet on 
it." 

The bluffer looked surprised and put out, 
but there was a passenger on his left who 
seemed to be a humble and religious man and 
he tackled him with: 

" No doubt, sir, you believe in hell, as mil- 
lions of others do, but I'm one of the few who 
don't. I'll bet you $300 to $100 that all talk 
about such a place is the veriest nonsense. 
Put down your stuff ! " 

"I couldn't — not on that side," replied 
Billy Rowland. 

"Oh! You have an excuse, eh?" 

" Yes, sir. I don't believe in hed any 
more than you do. In fact, I'm on my way 
to see a man who does, and to bet him ten 
to one that he's either a fool or a lunatic." 

The bluffer from Bluffville looked up and 
down the car and saw that everybody was 
smiling at him, and thrusting the roll into his 
pocket he shook his head and ruefully said: 

" I never got into such a crowd before. If 
I'd offer to bet two to one that old Uncle Billy 
Rubottom was alive every blamed one of you 
would claim to have shaken hands with him 
this morning! " 

I wish to applaud the new Library direc- 
tors for suspending one of the attendants 
charged with holding out books for friends, a 
game that has been played right and left by 
the well paid Library attaches for a number 
of years. It is a well known fact that there 
are hundreds of tax paying men and women 
in the city that admit that they long ago 
abandoned the idea of obtaining a new or a 
popular book, and there are hundreds of 
others who pay no taxes who boast that they 
can get either at any time through their 
chums at the Library. There are thousands 
of people in Los Angeles — journalists, law- 
yers and others — who have never been able to 
get new books, and have been really laughed 
at by saucy female attendants for asking for 
them. The writer of this has never been able 
to obtain a new book from the Library that he 
pays some round taxes to keep up, and has 
not attempted to get any for eightyears, for 
he was long ago convinced that all the new 
books and especially novels, were gobbled 
immediately by the friends of the girls to do 
no such improper things. It ought to be that 
the tax payer should enjoy some privileges of 
the Library and not that the easterner and 
Library girls capture them all. 

Senator and Mrs. John P. Jones and Miss 
Jones of Nevada and Santa Monica are domi- 
ciled for the winter at the Arlington, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Cream, Cheese, Butter, Eggs, Poultry. 
It is one of toe most convenient things in house- 
keeping to have these staples delivered fresh to your 
kitchen when you want them. T. Page Reeve, 548 
South Spring St. 



Western Graphic 



7 




TLbt Crown of the Valley 

DEAREST BETTY:— The great event 
which has nearly absorbed all the in- 
terest of the younger society set in Pasadena 
during the past two months has taken place; 
the wedding of Miss Virginia Preston Row- 
land and C Warring Leffingwell Jr. The 
marriage was solemnized Wednesday evening 
at All Saints Church, and all went as merry 
as the traditional wedding bell although 
death has twice crossed the rose-strewn path- 
way of the bride and groom since preparations 
for the marriage were begun. First the swell 
reception which was to follow the wedding 
was given up on account of the death of an 
aunt of the bride, next two of the bridesmaids 
were prevented from assisting by the death of 
their grandmother, and one of the ushers lost 
his mother by sudden death". 

Jessica says everything had been too rose- 
colored and ideal for this young couple and 
she will be contented if nothing interferes 
with her dreams of love when her time comes 
worse than the death of a few relatives. 
Jessica is shockingly heartless sometimes. 

The wedding was lovely anyway. The 
church was beautiful in green and white and 
the bride looked perfectly lovely in her white 
bergaline gown and long tulle veil. The 
bridesmaids were chosen from the prettiest 
girls in town, Misses Libby, Cloud, Armstrong 
and Leffiingwell acting in that capacity, and 
the Misses Hubbard were to have been of the 
number. Miss Edith Rowland, the bride's 
sister, was maid of honor, and wore the sweet- 
est gown of bright green. All the girls carried 
American beauty roses except the bride, who 
carried li 1 lies of the valley, and a prettier 
group of girls couldn't be found anywhere. 
The ushers were Messrs. Rowan, Hastings, 
Groenendyke, Macomber, Leffingwell and 
McGilvray. A. M. Lindeay acted as best 
man. 

After the ceremony the bridal party was 
entertained at the home of the bride's parents, 
Dr. and Mrs. Francis D. Rowland, and the 
wedding cake was cut. Then the bride and 
groom went away on a bridal journey, and 
of course wouldn't tell any one where they 
were going. When they return, or later in the 
season, a large reception will be given in their 
honor. 

Miss Libby gave an elaborate bridesmaids 
dinner at Hotel Green, in the private dining 
room, Monday evening, in honor of Miss Row- 
land. The decorations were all in red. Red 
carnations were arranged in a tall cut glass 
vase for a center piece, and the cloth was 
strewn with maiden hair ferns. A spray of 
orange blossoms was laid at each place and 
the dinner cards were ornamented with two 
red hearts pierced with an arrow of gold. 
The scene was illuminated by red candles in 
silver candelabra, and the lights were subdued 
by red shades. The whole effect was charm- 
ing. The bridesmaids and ushers were 
present as well as the prospective bride and 
groom, and the affair was chaperoned by Dr. 
and Mrs. Up de Graff. 

Another noteworthy social event of the 
week was the entertaining of the San Souci 
Club Thursday afternoon by Mrs. A. R. Met- 
calf in the parlors of the East building of Hotel 
Green. 

Dr. and Mrs. Fenyes have issued invita- 



tions for a large reception to be followed by a 
dance, for February tenth. The function is 
in the nature of a coming out party for their 
daughter, Miss Leonore Muse, and we are 
greatly anticipating it. 

Mrs. E. R. Hull of Waverly Drive gives a 
large ladies card party this afternoon, but 
only married ladies are invited. 

Phyllis. 

INCIDENTS THAT ARE NEVER FORGOTTEN. 

ONE of the most charming persons in 
Washington thirty odd years ago was 
George Otis, who was an Epicure of high 
degree. He was agent of Ben Holliday and 
the Overland Stage Co., and was quite inti- 
mate with ways of getting "star" contracts 
and of renewing the same. He could give 
lessons to many a chef and he was past grand 
master of the mysteries of the charing dish. 
Otis used to "lay" for some fellow to "break- 
fast" with him, as he everlastingly hated to 
eat alone. While placidly encouraging my 
staunch ally, Dame Nature, at Welcker's, on 
14th street, one winter afternoon in 1866, who 
should come in straight from the Baltimore 
depot but Otis. He hadn't time to eat any- 
thing as he had got to see three senators, six 
congressmen and an auditor and leave for 
New York in the evening. I had just ordered 
some chicken fried in cream — not chicken 
Cromesque, mind you, but plain old chicken 
fried in plain old cream — and he sat down 
with me. It was about 3 p. m., and being in 
a hurry he ordered only a dish of terrapin, a 
canvas-back, a plate of celery, a pint bottle of 
dry Monopole, black coffee, and a Victoria 
Reina cigar. Nothing could be simpler, you 
see, and all purely and patriotically Ameri- 
can. Nothing exotic or far-fetched about that 
plain little dinner. Terrapin and ducks 
swarm in nearby waters, only waiting to be 
snared; celery is to be had for the asking; so 
is the bill. It was of course after bank hours 
when Mr. Otis arrived, and as I was thus 
privileged to lend hjin the money to settle the 
bill, I am able to itemize the account, which 
will show even the humblest gastronome that 
a plain dinner in a first-class place costs no 
more than the same articles indifferently 
cooked and carelessly served in a second-class 
place. Canvas- back duck, .$'2.50; terrapin, 
Maryland style, $1.25; celery, 30 cents; cham- 
pagne, $1.75; coffee, 25 cents; cigar, 25 cents; 
total, $6.30. Otis used to dilate on break- 
fasts, and once said to me: "Breakfast, be- 
ing the most important, should be the most 
comfortable meal of the day. Every day of a 
well-ordered life should be a succession of 
pleasant surprises, and may be made so, no 
matter how light and trivial some of the sur- 
prises may seem to be to solemn old bores. 
So a good breakfast should be arranged in 
little surprises to the stomach of digestible, 
palatable dishes, varied every two or three 
days. Any man of average ability with a 
substantial breakfast can earn his dinner, and 
if he should chance to be temporarily a little 
down on his luck, and is half as popular a 
fellow as, say, Jack Wharton or Dick Winter- 
smith, he may be invited to dinner; he may 
even, if necessary, go without his dinner, but 
to go without breakfast after a night's long 
fast, is to destroy onesself on the very 
threshold of the day's possibilities. Now, do 
as I tell you, and resolve to pay more atten- 
tion to your breakfast and waste less thought 
and time on that most artificial of the exac- 
tion of a high civilization, dinner. There are 



but two necessary and enjoyable meals — 
breakfast and perhaps a late supper with an 
agreeable and good-looking woman." 

Old General Schenck was a splendid liver, 
and once said to me that he ate dinners to 
please other people and breakfasts because 
they were necessary and because he enjoyed 
them. 

Joe Howard, the distinguished correspon- 
dent and I met one snowy morning at 
Welcker's and we talked over this subject of 
meals, and I remember Joe said: "I would 
suggest that the menu for dinner be changed 
to one for breakfast to aid lazy, undecided 
people to know what they want to eat at that 
helpless hour of the morning when they are 
usually the defenseless prey of a greasy, heed- 
less waiter. The imagination should act in 
happy accord with the material appetite. For 
that reason select]a snowy morning, like this 
— a thick, fast, dazzling white snow is best. 
Face the bow-window with a warm cannel- 
coal fire at your right hand at 9 o'clock, 
watch the people trudge paet with cold feet 
and the snow banked up in their ears and on 
their coat-collars, compelled to be out every 
day and drudge for a living because they 
don't know how to sit in doors all day if they 
want to, and earn their woodcock, sausages, 
muffins, Spanish omelette, and hot, fragrant 
coffee, with a simple five-cent Faber pencil 
No. 2, or a little pack of cards, only 52, no 
bigger than a man's hand." 

I was once a guest of Sunset Cox at a din- 
ner at Welcker's that I have never forgotton 
not only on account of the delectable viands 
and service and irreproachable wines, but be- 
cause every minute sparkled with "feast of 
reason and How of soul." The guests were 
Hon. David Davis, Gen Joseph E. Johnston, 
Gen. Horace Porter (now minister to France)) 
George Alfred Townsend and John Russell 
Young. The first movement toward expan- 
sion was the absorption of a Manhattan cock- 
tail of Jeffersonian proportions and then fol- 
lowed the viands made extremely palatable 
by a. chef who knew the market by heart and 
wines of vintages most approved by Epicurean 
consecration. But it was the wit and wisdom 
that gave divinity to the merely material act 
of mastication. The host was in his cheeriest 
mood and abounded in brilliant reminiscences 
of travel from Indus to Poles. Judge Davis, 
from a treasury of memory, poured forth 
anecdote after anecdote of bench and bar. 
General Johnston was enthusi asticover Napol- 
eon and Sherman, and would not brook dis- 
paragement of the "vastest intellect that ever 
commanded men." General Porter was as 
pyrotechnical as when down in front of Mur- 
freesboro he was the genius of everlasting 
mirth. Townsend was most felicitous in de- 
tailing the phenomena of politics and journal- 
ism, and Young told of the charms of such 
men as Forneys, Henry Winter Davis, Fre- 
mont, Wintersmith and Sam Ward. And 
even the writer did not confine himself to 
"eloquent flashes of silence" alone. Now, 
was that not a gastronomic and intellectual 
symposium worth remembering with pride? 
Every man there was a bread winner at the 
time and, with the exception of Porter, had 
perhaps never cut off a coupon in his life. 

B. C. T. 

Some eastern editor cries out " 0 for one 
single hour of Cleveland! " Well, we don't 
object — we could put up with the old man for 
just about that length of time. 



8 



Western Graphic 




<XUtb Our Boys at JHanUa 

FILIPINO PECULIARITIES. 

Cl' ARTEL DE MeISIC, 

Manila, P. L, Dec. 4, 1898. 

NOT the least interesting of the many 
singularities of the Tagalo (natives) is 
the laying to rest the bodies whose spirits 
have taken their flight to the land where 
sorrow turns to gladness. 

The manner in which the bodies are treated 
leads one to conclude that after all with them 
the vital point in man's existence is the salva- 
tion of the soul. For dust thou art to dust 
returnest. 

Among recent interments I have noted 
these methods of solemnizing the last earthly 
rites. As a funeral procession arrives at the 
cemetery the departed is generally laid to 
rest without any additional eulogies, prayers 
or benediction; these solemn rites having 
been performed at the church by the padre 
(priest). 

A little grave scarcely two and a half feet 
deep and usually too narrow and too short, 
necessitating a great deal of scraping in order 
to enlarge the same, is to be the resting place 
of the deceased. Sometimes the remains of 
some forgotten member of society are un- 
earthed. These are laid aside and when the 
new tenant takes up his abode in "God's 
Acre," these remains are thrown on top of 
the new coffin and the twain rest together. If 
the people are very poor, the church furnishes 
a coffin to take the body to the cemetery. It 
is then taken out, wrapped in a bamboo 
wicker, and perhaps a month later not a trace 
remains of the interment. 

While on outpost the other evening a 
small procession of mourners were following 
a hearse headed by a brass band. Most of 
them were smoking and chatting in merry 
humor, and, arriving at their destination, the 
band struck up a lively air as the remains 
were taken from the hearse. 

In the case here cited, a sweet little babe 
that had seen the sunshine but twelve months, 
had passed away. The gorgeously decorated 
coffin was stripped of all adornments, the lid 
removed and the mother allowed one last 
look. How touching this scene; many were, 
moved to tears as she arranged for the last 
time the pretty shawl that made the winding 
sheet, bending a while over the form, and then 
again and again readjusting the shawl, a 
crown daintily wreathed was placed upon her 
brow, the lid replaced, and the band struck 
up "There'll be a Hot Time in the Old Town 
Tonight." The grave proved to be too small, 
and by the light of the candle it was widened 
and deepened. A short time of quiet, all 
was ready for "filling in," and a member of 
the pany called for music; "Yankee Doodle" 
set all hearts glad, there was clapping of 
hands and not a few cheered. The earth was 
replaced and as the last spadefulls were put 
in place the notes of "Dixie" died on the eve- 
ning air. These natives are practical and 
demonstrate that they rejoice in the promise 
of life eternal Geo. J. Oden, 

Battery "H," 3d Artillery. 

Varying emotions are caused when read- 
ing in the detailed vote of the assembly for 
United States Senator, "Bliss of Oakland," 
"Blood of Angels," "Knight of Sacramento" 
and "Works of San Diego," 



A HYPNOTIST'S SURPRISE 

BY FRANCES WORKMAN 

MR. HARRIS was a Harvard graduate 
and though he had been in the West 
three years, " working like a trooper," as he 
wrote his family, still he had time to " do 
society a little." 

His strong, magnetic iniluence over people 
had been the pride of his life; his boast was 
that, given a certain length of time, he could 
make any woman bend to his will. 

He was a great reader, and of late his 
tendency had been toward books on hyp- 
notism, and finally he had arrived at the con- 
clusion that, instead of possessing strong per- 
sonality, he had, in reality, a hypnotic power 
merely waiting opportunity of cultivation. 

He had procured many works on the sub- 
ject and had practiced on all who would sub- 
mit, until he had reached quite an enviable 
degree of perfection. 

Mr. Harris was a constant visitor at the 
house of Mrs. Gibbon, a widow with four 
married daughters — and one more, the flower 
of the family, still enjoying single blessed- 
ness. Miss Lucie was a tall, thin young 
woman, so loose jointed that each portion of 
her body seemed to work in a way quite its 
own and not at all accountable to the tout 
ensemble. Her hands were long and bony and 
when waved in the air the fingers undulated 
like the lash on the end of a whip. 

But these little defects were happily neutral- 
ized by an exceedingly amiable disposition 
and a certain indescribable way of attracting 
people. In fact it had been said that she had 
had thirty proposals in the twenty-eight years 
of her maidenhood. No one could deny it — 
she would not — nor could they account for 
this unusual popularity with the masculine 
sex. 

One evening there was the usual crowd of 
young people at her home, including all her 
married sisters and their husbands. Lucie was 
writing by planchette, much to the amusement 
of all, when the door bell rang and Mr. Harris 
made his appearance. 

After speaking to all he came to shake 
hands with Miss Lucie. 

"You are a great success," said he, " that 
is something I have only tried once or twice 
so far, but I am a complete failure." 

"O that is nothing compared with what 
she can do," said one of the guests. " Lucie 
can make tables and chairs follow her, find 
hidden objects and do all sorts of wierd 
things." 

" What an unfailing source of amusement 
you must be to your friends," paid Mr. Harris 
in a condescending tone, "but while you 
have power over inanimate things, I have 
power over living, breathing human beings, 
such as your charming self, and I would like 
to wager that I can hypnotize you." 

" You can't do it," said some. 

" Try," said others. 

But Miss Lucie declined. 

"Of course he could hypnotize me," said 
she, " I have no power in that line, but he 
won't, for I shall not give him the chance." 

All begged her, but still she refused. At 
last her mother, a sweet faced little woman, 
said, " Let him try, Lucie, no harm can come 
of it, and it will be amusing. I did not know 
that Mr. Harris could lay claims to such a 
power; let us see if they are well founded." 
And after much persuasion she finally gave 
her consent. 



" Now," said Mr. Harris, " sit down here, 
look me straight in the eyes. Of course you 
can exercise your will power against mine, 
but you must look at me all the time, and if 
you — turning to the rest of the company — 
will all be perfectly quiet, you will soon see 
the result of my experiment." 

Miss Lucie sat down, her hands in her lap, 
and riveted her eyes on the hypnotist. Fix- 
ing a stony stare upon her he began mov- 
ing his hands in a slow, snake-like motion. 
Silence reigned supreme. 

These movements continued for some time, 
but gradually his eyes wavered and his head 
dropped a little, but all thought that was part 
of the hypnotic process, and never once did 
Miss Lucie take her eyes from his face. 

Suddenly to the surprise of all present his 
head dropped forward on his breast, his hands 
fell, his body swayed, and before anybody could 
catch him Mr. Harris dropped on the floor, 
and Mrs. Gibbon cried in an appalling tone: 
" Why Lucie, what have you done? What is 
the matter? It's all my fault. Have you 
hypnotized him? Is he dead? 01 what shall 
we do?" 

Just what was the matter no one knew, 
but all ran to the rescue, and finally they de- 
cided he had been hypnotized. 

Mrs. Gibbon gently and ineffectively 
rubbed his forehead, and the four brothers-in- 
law each took a limb, which they worked 
up and down in the most extraordinary 
manner. 

Miss Lucie was at first too astonished to 
say anything, but, collecting her shattered 
wits, she rushed from the room, soon return- 
ing, and before anyone could stop her on- 
slaught a whole pail of water had been dashed 
over the now unresisting hypnotist. 

Miss Luoie dropped to her knees and with 
one hand wildly pounding the poor man's 
chest she kept in the other a wet rag with 
which she energetically slapped his face. 

The energy of the entire company was too 
much for even Mr. Harris' collapsed state, and 
finally he opened his eyes to find himself a 
much bedraggled piece of humanity. 

His chagrin was great, but he was not al- 
lowed to leave until he had been fussed over 
by the women and bundled up by the men, 
although he insisted he was quite himself 
again. 

But he did not look it, and appearances 
count for something. 

When they were alone they all looked for 
Miss Lucie to talk things over, but were horri- 
fied to find her in tears, and all their sym- 
pathy, enthusiasm or admiration elicited but 
the one response, " I don't care, I just won't 
ever be hypnotized again by anybody, and 
don't you ever ask me af. ain, either." 

It is always a pleasure to meet Fred 
Warde, who is as fine a fellow as he is an 
actor. When in New York he is always a 
welcome visitor at the Lotus and Lambs' 
Clubs and when in San Francisco at the 
Bohemian and Press Clubs. Warde is one of 
the best story tellers in the country, and he 
always used to to take his lunches and dinners 
among the newspaper men and artists of the 
Bohemian Club when in San Francisco, and 
always paid that sunshiny resort a visit after 
he play. He is a jolly good fellow and can 
take as many stirrup-cups as anyone and yet 
be up with chanticleer in the morning. He is 
also an exemplary gentleman and would 
scorn to do a mean or ignoble thing on or off 
the stage. He has made a multitude of friends 
all over the country by his pleasant ways and 
by his charitable methods that are not con- 
fined to his own profession. 



Western Graphic 



9 




Tlbe fiorse Sbow 

february 1,2,3, 4, 1899 

THE following letter from Governor Gage 
will show his interest in the Horse Show 
and his desire to co-operate in the opening 
exercises: 

Sacramento, Cal., Jan. 14, 1899. 
M. S. Severance, Esq., 

Prest. Horse Show Association, 

Byrne Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Dear Mr. Severance: — Your kind letter 
of date January 10, 1899, requesting my pres- 
ence at the Horse Show on the evening of 
Wednesday, February 1, has just been re- 
ceived. 

As you well know 1 am deeply interested 
in horses, and while I would like very much 
to be present with you at the opening of your 
show, yet the great pressure of state affairs, 
due the ineetiog of the Legislature, will pre- 
vent my attendance. However, if you can 
arrange the matter suitably so that I could 
press the button in Sacramento which would 
open the Horse Show in Los Angeles, as you 
suggest in your letter, I will very gladly take 
part in the ceremony. 

Thanking you for your favor, and with 
best wishes for the success of the Horse Show, 
I am, as ever, 

Yours very sincerely, 

Henry T. Gage. 
Among those who have lately engaged 
private boxes are Mrs. E. T. Earle, Mrs. Cap- 
tain Thorn, Mrs. Emeline Childs, Mrs. Arcadia 
B. de Baker and Mrs. A. Howard of San 
Francisco. 

The Southern California and Southern Pa- 
cific railroads have both shown a further in- 
terest in the Horse Show by granting a one- 
third round trip rate from all points in 
Southern California, to hold good during the 
Horse Show, and for the two days of the fol- 
lowing week on which the polo match and the 
pony races take place at Agricultural Park. 
This commendable liberality of the railroads 
will go far towards insuring the success of 
the Horse Show, and will produce a sort of 
gala week in Los Angeles which should be a 
source of gratification to the merchants and 
others. 

A large force of workmen are at work put- 
ting up tents, stalls, private boxes and other 
adjuncts for the horse show in Fiesta Park 
and the Los Angeles Electrical Company is 
planning many unique and picturesque fea- 
tures by way of electrical displays. 

It is probable that on Saturday afternoon, 
February 4, a low rate of admission will be 
granted to all school children of the city, 
enabling the little folks to enjoy the Horse 
Show at a mere nominal price. Due an- 
nouncement will be made of this later on. 

Mayor Eaton has accepted the invitation 
of the Horse Show Association to be present 
and take part in the opening exercises on the 
evening of Wednesday, February 1. 

Bernhardt has been tempting Vesuvius 
and the volcano's flames clipped a curl as a 
souvenir. The gallant old crater evidently 
appreciated what was expected of it in the 
way of advertising and now has one more 
relic to lay away with those several Pompeiian 
beauties of 79 A. D. 



It is hoped that the trouble at Iloilo will 
take a few kinks out of the city's name, as 
well as out of the insurgents. 



AN EPISODE OF TOMBSTONE 

BY BEN C« TRUMAN 

THERE had been many an event in and 
about Tombstone that had been lacking 
in neither the dramatic nor the sublime. The 
bodies of those restless adventurers who had 
started in to run the town after the spontan- 
eous municipality had become an argentifer- 
ous reality had been the first to fringe the 
otherwise neglected footpath from the ceme- 
tary gate to the declivity in the center of the 
plat; and it may be noted, incidentally, that 
"Arkansas Bledsoe," who had been the first 
victim of the " latv-and order-vigilantes " — 
who had strung up Bledsoe because he had 
boasted that he would walk up and down the 
vertebrae of the first mayor that dared to put 
water in his whiskey — was lain to rest in the 
lower part of the declivity at his own request; 
for, as he had felicitously put it, "the rains 
will settle there and the grass will grow luxur- 
iantly and no kind person need trouble him- 
self about keeping my grave nice and green." 
" The Sun-flower Twins " from Missouri had 
made a great fight against the sheriff and his 
posse, and seven cadavers had been taken to 
the graveyard in one wagon, the whole town 
turning out in the procession, except one bar- 
tender and one faro dealer of each saloon; — to 
be sure, this had been one of the most stir- 
ring and spectacular occurrences in the whole 
history of Tombstone, partly because " Three- 
card-Monte Thompson " had read the service 
over the graves in the absence of the Rev. Mr. 
Goodlove, who had eloped with the .widow 
Grass the day previous. Avatars of evil, who 
had experienced magical escapes from other 
violent localities, had come to grief after only 
a few days' denizenship; and the redoubtable 
Ben Armstrong had kicked his hangman 
twice so severely under the chin that he failed 
to adjust the noose properly and the vigilant 
spectators were compelled to perforate the re- 
doubtable Benjamin instanter — and there had 
been many other events that were not only 
highly dramatic and interesting but that were 
the talk of the sample rooms and pool rooms 
by those leading members of Tombstone soci- 
ety who wore Mexican ppurs and sombreros 
and who eked out a desperate livelihood by 
doing nothing respectable except to occasion- 
ally get the drop on worse men than them- 
selves and who generally celebrated New Years 
by shooting out the lights of all the stores 
where intoxicating drinks were not sold. 

But there was one cowboy at Tombstone 
who stood at the head of his class in all fron- 
tier diversions and avocations, and there were 
none to say nor do him harm. He was six-feet- 
one in hi3 boots and wore the finest kind of 
doeskin trousers made by a New York tailor; 
his spurs and pistols were of silver and he 
affected white linen shirts and collars and the 
most fastidious of ties; he clung to the regu- 
lation handkerchief for the neck, but rolled 
his cigarettes with his gauntlets on, and dared 
a boutonniere of dainty colors and proportions, 
especially when starting out with pigment 
sufficient for a whole night's patrol. He 
might even invite himself to drink, alone, 
without eliciting the least seeming disappro- 
bation from the most vicious of his com- 
panions. 

It was understood that he had come from 
a good Boston family, and his avowed prefer- 
ence for brown bread and baked pork and 
beans as regularly as Sunday mornings came 
around betrayed his gustatory allegiance to 



and punctiliousntss for the forms practiced 
during his twigship on the family tree; and 
it was fully known that he was a graduate of 
Harvard, and that he had been a prominent 
young member of Philip Brooke' church. 

His irreproachable manners at the table, 
at the roulette, in the bar room and in com- 
pany, generally, was a pleasure rather than 
otherwise to his frontier classmates; and that 
he abjured all profanity and slang and was 
the more attractive by its eschewment was as 
palpable as the heat of a July day from Yuma 
to Maricopa Wells. That he parted his hair 
in the middle and wore a Van Dyke beard 
never even incurred the slightest aggravation 
of his admirers. To be sure a Tucson Terror 
once commanded him to take off his " biled 
shirt," which he deliberately did, after which 
he took away the six-shooter of the Tucson 
masquerader, then made him take off his 
clothes and put on the garment that had of- 
fended him — and then the Chesterfieldian ath- 
lete caught up his victim and placed him in 
the big refrigerator of the Gem Sample Room, 
and set up the drinks for the crowd including 
the unfortunate fellow in cold storage. Once 
the postmaster had said to him that he had 
noticed that all his letters were addressed in 
a feminine hand. But he made no reply in 
words. Just a single pistol shot and a new 
appointment from Washington in the usual 
rapid transit time. 

But he was the bravest, the most chival- 
rous, the most liberal, the most charitable and 
the most generally attractive cowboy that 
ever lived in Arizona; he was a superb rider, 
an unerring shot, and a friend of the unfor- 
tunate as far as he could be. And, so, when 
Edward Everett Raymond died the grief of 
Tombstone knew no bounds. He had been its 
most eminent and respectable citizen, and the 
attaches of the Gem and Topaz, and of all 
the saloons and faro banks, in fact, attended 
the funeral with department store crape on 
their left arms, and Johnny Handy had im- 
provised a hearse from his go-as-you-please 
express wagon, and the mayor had closed his 
bar room during the movement of the gro- 
tesquely amplificated procession through the 
principal streets. 

There had been no inquest on Raymond's 
body, although he had dropped dead at the 
Delmonico Restaurant just after his break- 
fast had been served. But his companion at 
that sad meal, Solomon Mendenhall, a travel- 
ing man from San Francisco, always claimed 
that he knew the cause of Gentleman Ed's 
demise: "He took up his cup of coffee," says 
Sol, "and there were two flies in it, don't you 
see? — and he fell over dead ! He was a Bos- 
tonian, you know." 

"The lesson inflicted upon us," says Sa- 
gasta," "has been hard, but it will be fruit- 
ful." If it will be, and all the world hopes it 
will be, Spain should thank the United States 
from the bottom of her heart for giving the 
lesson, for no country known to man needed 
it so much as Spain. 

Those statesmen who argue that the 
United States cannot accept the Phillipines 
should pause long enough to remember that 
the acceptance is already made, signed, sealed 
and delivered to one William McKinley, 
Washington, D. C. 

Col. Bryan is again suffering from a severe 
cold. It is remarkable the large number of 
political motives that man hasl 



10 



Western Graphic 




THE Orpheum bill this week is just a little 
better than the average — that means a 
most enjoyable entertainment for two and a 
half hours. Willy Ozeola has first place on 
the program and while there is little origin- 
ality in his balancing he does his work very 
creditably. 




MISS <)I"ERITA VINCENT, at the Orpheum 

I like to see a graceful girl dance, espec- 
ially when the prelude to the dance is a clever 
song. Qucrita Vincent is a graceful girl, and 
no doubt has a good voice for topical songs, 
but like many misinformed young women per- 
sists in reciting the words so that if one is 
interested in the music, which comes only 
from the orchestra, Miss Vincent becomes a 
secondary consideration, and on the oiher 
hand there are only too few topical or coon 
songs the words of which are even of passing 
interest — and there you are, Querita. 

Charles J. Stine and Miss Ollie Evans pre- 
sent a very labored conglomeration of noth- 
ing, which is in unfortunate contrast to the 
comedy, "Belinda Bailey's Boarders," given 
by Barton Hill and Charles Willard and 
company. What a lot of events surround old 
Barton Hill. Those who know the history of 
this veteran of the stage can almost lose 
themselves in thinking of his past, and that 
his joints should seem to be a trifle stiff 
when he is forced to run across the stage is not 
surprising when it is known that he has a son 
nearly or quite fifty years old. Mr. Hill 
starred with some of the greatest actors of 
half a century ago and with Edwin Forrest 
he played alternate roles. It was to Barton 
Hill that Modjeska first applied for a hearing, 
he finally bringing her out. But to get back 
to 1899, Charles Willard is the jolliest kind of 
an old forty niner and Ella Southern is as 
sweet as any widow ought to be. 

The Rappo Sisters give some new figures 
in their dancing and Miss Berger continues 
in favor with her artistic cornet playing. 

HI HENRY'S minstrels held things down 
at the Los Angeles theater for the entire 
week, giving a very good show as minstrels 
go. The daily street parade, headed by Hi 
Henry and his Russian wolf hound as large as 
a colt, was the most notable feature of the en- 
gagement, the thirty-piece band presenting a 
most interesting spectacle with many instru- 
ments not often seen in Los Angeles. 



THERE was a murmur of disappointment 
when Gerome Helmont came upon the 
platform and occupied the first fifteen seconds 
in picking the hair out of his eyes and tossing 
his head in a Ysayesque way. Then one 
naturally looked at his face. He is fat and 
well fed and his round face is mobile, he is a 
veteran of the concert stage at fifteen, and 
will be a memory at twenty. His tone is 
wonderful for a boy; a man's strength is his 
greatest need, and through all can be seen the 
charm of Musin of ten years ago. 

Miss Grace Preston has a delightfully 
smooth and round contralto and sings with 
cultured finish. 

Miss Ida Simmons, aside from being an 
excellent pianist is a handsome young woman 
and her grace and simplicity of manner is 
quite the charm of the evening. 

AT the Burbank Nance O'Neil has had a 
very successful third week and aside 
from her voice shows little fatigue after ten 
performances a week for so long. The com- 
pany leaves at once for a short Southern Cal- 
ifornia tour, and then north and east and 
then to England, where Miss O'Neil will be 
given a rest which she richly deserves. 




BARTON HILL 

Los Angeles Theater— The next attraction at the 
Los Angeles theater is to be an up to date, cleanly 
cut farce comedy, entitled "Two Married Men," 
which has been playing to splendid business through 
the East and Northwest, and comes to us heralded by 
excellent press notices and a fat bank account, which 
is the best indication of a successful and entertaining 
traveling attraction. It is a farce comedy presented 
by a clever company, full of funny situations gath- 
ered together by George R. Edeson, its author, who 
is a well known comedian himself. This farce is very 
lively, full of movement, a bright, witty dialogue with 
a few acts which flavor of the old time negro features, 
but which are so carefully placed as not to be detri- 
mental to the piece. It is full of witticisms which 
keep one laughingand is entirely free from horse play, 
the kind of an attraction that the Los Angeles pub- 
lic seem to like. It opens on Sunday evening, Feb 
ruary 5, with Monday and Tuesday evenings ending 
the engagement. Following this attraction comes 
that delightful actor. Frank Daniels, one of the 
greatest comedy artists that ever appeared in Los 
Angeles, with his two big comedy operas, "The Wiz- 
ard of the Nile" and "An Idol's Eye." Daniels has 
not been seen here since he appeared in " Little 
Puck " a long time ago. Since then he has forsaken 
farce comedy and entered light opera with the result 



that today he keeps an acknowledged position in the 
first rank of light opera comedians. His two operas 
which he will produce under the management of 
Kirl La Shelle are by Henry D. Smith, the author of 
" Robin Hood," and Victor Herbert, ihe well known 
composer. Daniels is as great a favorite as ever. It 
is a great stock in trade for a comedian to have a 
fuDny mug, and many an actor has won fame as a 
comedian on his face alone. Time has dealt kindly 
with Frank Daniels in this respect, for, if his face 
was his fortune many years ago, it is a big bonanza 
to him now that it has wrinkled and seamed itself 
into the semblance of a Japanese nut cracker. It is 
funny, too, that the lines which from any other actor's 
lips would fall with a dismal thud are absolutely 
humorous when accompanied by the select assort- 
ment of mugs which give them point and emphasis, 
as Mr. Daniels plays the part 

Owing to the very excellent patronage received by 
the Hi. Henry Minstrels and the extreme satisfaction 
expressed by those musical entertainments during 
the last week Manager Hi. Henry has arranged to ex- 
tend his engagement through Sunday, Monday, 
Tuesday and Wednesday evenings, with a Wednes- 
day matinee. A splendid pr ogram will be presented 
during the ensuing week. 

Orpheum— The cream of European and American 
vaudeville is again skimmed by the Orpheum people 
for their bill next week, and the prospect is for a great 
attendance on the splendid new features provided. 

One of the most sensational of the many great 
European acts imported by the Orpheum circuit, is 
the Arbras group, four in number, who perform a 
series of musical and gymnastic feats that are un- 
precedented in every way. There are three girls and 
one man in the company, and they combine to play 
all sorts of instruments in all sorts of positions, such 
for instance as where the man supports the three girls 
who are seated on a board doing a bell ringing act. 
Another of the trio plays a cornet while doing a one 
hand balance on a slender stand. 

The best Irish comedian on the American stage is 
undoubtedly Johnny Carroll, and he, with Miss Addie 
Crawford, is coming to swell the tide of merriment 
at the Orpheum next week. His latest song "How'd 
You Like to be the Iceman," is a world better accord- 
ing to report and is certain to be whistled every- 
where after next Monday night. 

Carter de Haven, the juvenile prodigy whose sing- 
ng at the Orgheum a couple of years ago was the 
sensation of the season, is to return next week and 
with him a little girl, called nothing more than 
"Maie," the twain doing a sketch "A Naval Reserve " 

Barton Hill, the famous old California actor and 
manager, whose name is a household word on the 
coast, has enjoyed an ovation nightly during the 
week. The piece in which he with Chas. Willard and 
their company appear, "Belinda Bailey's Boarders," is 
a splendid comedy and will be repeated, by request, 
next week. 

Chas. Stine, of whom so much was expected in the 
way of fun making powers, has, in the professional 
jargon, "made good." His skit "A Frisky Doctor'' 
will be repeated by him with Miss 4 OHie Evans next 
week, new songs and witty sayings being, of course, 
incorporated in the proceedings. 

Frause and Rosa, the gay girls with their scream- 
ingly funny ' Dutch Pickaninnies" will also vary their 




'TENNES9EE8 PARDNER," at the Bnrbauk 



fun making vehicle, and Miss Querita Vincent is to 
have new coon songs and dances. 



Burbank— Nance O'Neifs three week's season at 
the Burbank concludes with the Sunday night per- 
formance. "East Lynne" will be given at the mati- 
nee Saturday. Oliver Twist will be repeated Satur- 
day night by request and the young tragedienne will 
make her farewell appearance Sunday night in an 
adaptation of Wilbranth's great play " The Daughter 
of Frabrisua." 

Manager Shaw has secured a return engagement 
of Arthur C. Aiston's company presenting "Tennes- 
see's Pardner," which scored a positive artistic and 
financial success here last eeason. From the way the 
crictics of the country have again endorsed this pro- 
duction, the company which will present " Tennes- 
see's Pardner" at the Burbank theatre six nights and 
at the usual matinees, commencing Tuesday, has 
shown no 6igns of let-down in quality that generally 
comes after a season or two of success. The company 
this season contains the principal people who have 
been identified with the play's success and the Gol- 
den Nuggett Quartette will be included among the 
favorites. They will be heard in an entirely new 
repertoire of vocal selections. • 

HOME LIFeIn^HAVANA. 

MR. Duque, of the Main Street Savings 
Bank, in March last, in conversation 
with me one day, drew a picture so perfect of 
what would occur if our troops moved on 
Cuba before autumn that I can find in it 
nothing but prophtcy. Yesterday Mr. Duque 
said: "Home life in Havana is a matter of 
little consequence; getting married is a matter 
of much detail and expense. There are, 
therefore, many young men in the city who 
live in barely furnished rooms and make life 
as light as possible. To these the well ordered 



Western Graphic 

T3URBANK THEATER 

1) Main St., bit. Fifth anri Sixth. Tel. H 1270 

'^-^ V. A. SHAW, lessee 

nn<ZE OWL 

Saturday Night "OLIVER TWIST." 

Sunday Night (farewell performance) "TRl'K To LIFE " 

Next Attr.lOt ion . 

Six Nights and two Matinees, commencing Tuesday, Jan 81: 



11 



First time at popular prices. 



OS ANGELES THEATER 



Tel. 
Main 70 



C. M. WOOD, and H. C. WY ATT, Lessees. 
They Have Captured the Town: 



Owing to the extraordinary success of the Kings o! 
Music and i^ong, 

The cngasement is extended through Sunday, Monday, Tuesday 
and Wednesday, Jan. J9, 30, 81, and Feb. L 

Fei,.5.6,7 "TWg PUfRRIEb HENo" 5 

Feb. s, 9, io. n-FRANK bJINIEL/ OFERd CO. 

SEATS now on sale for the Minstrels. Tel. Main 70, 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIRST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, Jan. 30. 

The Arbra Troupe, an Acrobatic Musical Troupe. 
Johnnie Caroll and* \ ..*;,.*„ 

A.Wlie Crawford ( Clever American Artists. 

Carter OeHayen I America's Greatest Juvenile Sketch Art- 
and Bonnie Maie / ists in "A Naval Reserve." 
Barton Hill 1 and Company, in a new Comedy by Milton 
Chas. Willard > Nobles, entitled : 

Ella Sothern j " Belinda Bailey's Boarders." 

MargkVeYuosa | and rhelr ° r 'g inal Dutch P«*nninies. 
< ha-. Stineandf In the Absurdly Funny Farce, "A Frisky 
Ollie Evans. t " Doctor." 

Querita Vincent, Dainty Singer and Dancer. 
EVENING 25 and 50 cts, gallery 10c. Matinees Wednesday 
Saturday and Sunday, any seat in the house 25c 





NATIVE STATE 2:14'-.; By Star f'ultan. Dam, Miss I.oveland by Wellington a son of Cuyler— Owned by C. E. Mayne, Los Angeles 



clubs are a source of supreme comfort. El 
Circulo de Asturianas is probably the biggest 
club in the world from a point of membership. 
The women of Havana have only a small 
share in the affairs of every day life such as 
the American ladies possess. Custom makes 
it impossible for them to enjoy that miscella- 
neous association so agreeable in the United 
States. There is no place in church or chari- 
table work for them to occupy. So nine- 
tenths of their waking time is spent in swing- 
ing lazily in a rocking chair, while the other 
tenth is used up in shopping excursions and 
in attending the dances." 

LegaITbusiness 

Wu attend to your leeal cases and make no charge 
if not successful. Our specialty is settling cases out 
of court. Hard collections collected. Advice free. 
Correspondence solicited. Langwortby Co., 22f> So. 
Spring street, Los Angeles. 



The Methodists in the Broadway M. E. 
church sat quietly last Sunday listening to 
their pastor's vivid description of hell fire, 
when, all of a sudden, Hames began to issue 
from the interior of the sacred structure, and 
despite the fact that they were just everyday 
flames that Walter Moore could easily extin- 
guish, the congregation made a rush for the 
doors, and that consecrated building was 
emptied instanter. The old Bible fire never 
caused a bit of scare, but when the real thing 
came issuing forth a few yards from the pul- 
pit no Shedracs nor Abednegos were to be 
found. Those old fictitious fires of Calvin, 
Wesley and Jonathan Ed wards seem to be go- 
ing out, anyway, but when it comes to the 
real thing, here, vou don't want to stand in 
its way, wbether it breaks out in a poker joint 
or a Methodist meeting house. 



Ben C. Trtt'MAN, Editor 



Western Graphic 

SPRING OF '99 EDITION 




The above miniature cover of the "Spring 
of '99 Edition " will be an exact reproduction 
in photo-chrome of a "water color painting. 

25c a Copy; 6 for $1.00 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

'Publishers 

311-313 New High Street 
Tel. M 1053 Los Angeles, Cal. 



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Restaurant and Refreshments 

Last car of the evening in every direction and for 

Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
After Theater Parties 



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12 



Western Graphic 



THE ROMANCE OF CHONITA. 

BY MARGARET KNIGHTLY. 

CHONITA had lived the eighteen summers 
of her uneventful life in the quaint little 
city of Santa Barbara, often called at present 
the "Newport of the Pacific," and by lovers 
of romance another Genoa. 

Lucky Chonita, to have first seen the light 
of day in a land where the air is sunny, 
balmy, dreamy and seductive, making the 
mere being alive in it a pleasure, with no 
care but of one's self, with no thought of pur- 
pose for time to come, or a future defined, 
than "manana" — not today. No wonder then 
that this child of nature, just budding forth 
into womanhood, reared under a sun that 
shone perpetually amid the fragrance of the 
ever blooming rose and fruits and grains 
growing riot, should have instilled in her a 
tinge of romance that would have proven a 
boon to the poets of old. 

Chonita's mother died when she was but a 
NiniTA, and her good Tia Juana had taken 
her to her heart where she was nurtured as 
her own. Her father, the venerable Don 
Pablo, with his only son Juanito, lived on a 
little plot of four acres lying close upon the 
sea margin in the Montecito, and somewhat 
fitfully, to be sure, did he work his small 
acreage, with too little steers and a wooden 
plow. While Juanito, paddling about bare- 
footed in the mud with a small clumsy hoe, 
turned the water in the acequi from ditch to 
ditch, until the whole field was freshened by 
the steady flowing streams. 

Tia Juana's CASA was a low, rnt-llow-brown 
adobe built round a patio, covered outside by 
graceful climbing Castillian roses, passion 
vines and wisteria; in the rear was an exten- 
sive grape arbor, and it was here in the cool 
summer evenings that Tia Juana dispensed 
the lavish hospitality, characteristic of the 
race to which she belonged. She bad no 
"day at home," but met her numerous friends 
at the pi'erta with the graceful salutation 
"Bien Venida, whenever they chose to come. 
Her guests were always bidden to the festive 
board, laden with tortillas that were white 
and flaky, enchiladas that were most tooth- 
some, and her tamales and dulces would 
tempt the most fastidious epicure. After the 
feast was over, Chonita would dance the fas- 
cinating Cachuca to the accompaniment of 
the tinkling guitar. It was impossible for 
the gay cavaliers to gaze upon her, while 
dancing to the plaintive music, not to feel the 
tendernesses of the heart awaken. The pic- 
turesque figure of the dancer, her black man- 
tilla draped round her slender figure, and 
with a mixture of wildness and melancholy in 
her fine black eyes, was to them entrancing. 
The very birds seemed to chirp their sweet- 
est, as if to keep time with her dainty feet and 
the click of the castanets. Tia Juana would 
puff slowly at her cigarrito, and sighing, 
would gaze with a fondness akin to adoration 
upon her sobrinita and wonder which one of 
the SEnoRs would some day claim her for 
his own. 

It was always the custom of Don Pablo, 
on Saturday of each week, to mount his 
burro, throw Juanito behind him, and go to 
Santa Barbara to visit Chonita. Chonita 
looked forward to these visits of her father 
with delightful anticipation, and on Sunday 
morning she would dress in her finest, don 
her prettiest reboso and, accompanied by her 
father, Tia Juana and Juanito, attend high 
mass at La Mission. 



To the native Californian these monu- 
ments of the past are objects of deep venera- 
tion. The saintly friars who came out into 
the wilderness to save souls showed an eye 
for the picturesque when they selected the 
site for this mission which, for charm of view 
and surroundings, is unsurpassed. 

In the chapel of the mission is an image of 
the Virgin which Chonita greatly loved, and 
she never omitted before leaving the church 
to kneel in front of the statue, and offer up 
an earnest prayer. This simple act seemed 
to greatly puzzle her old father; he knew that 
Chonita was a good girl, and could not 
imagine why, when her life was still so young, 
pure and joyous in its sweet innocence, it was 
necessary for her to pray so fervently. 

One evening after she had performed her 
simple household duties, he called her to him. 
He was seated on the vine-covered portal, 
where the gentle breeze wafted the fragrance 
of myriads of flowers over the broad valley, 
and the blue sky above was tinged with the 
many colors of the sun, while sinking in a 
blaze of glory behind the old mission. 
Chonita took her seat at the foot of her father; 
it was indeed a picture of contentment 
sublime. Don Pablo carefully rolled and 
lighted his cigarrito, and placing his hand 
upon the head of his beautiful daughter said 
to her: 

"Chonita, why dost thou pray so fervently 
to the Virgin, is there something special thou 
wishest for, querida?" 

For the first time in her young life Chonita 
felt selfish, her prayers were for her own con 
solation, and the good Padre Sanchez and Tia 
Juana had always instructed her to pray for 
her fellow being, but she resolved to tell the 
truth, and placing her arm around the old 
man's neck, said: 

"Padre mia, I have long had the secret 
which I now must tell; I do not love Pancho_ 
I have seen another I like more; he is not one 
of us, but an Americano. Ay dios! papa; he 
have the skin white like the altar cloth, eyes 
blue as the cielo, and hair yellow as the 
trigo, and I have called him "Mi Angel 
Blanco." 

The effect on the old man of this outburst 
of girlish enthusiasm was most pitiful, and 
thus he pondered; had Chonita, in whom he 
had always placed such confidence, so far for- 
gotten the sentiment of her people, the will of 
her father, and her faith to her lover that she 
had suffered her love to go out to one of those 
strangers, and had Tia Juana grown careless 
in her duty as duenna? 

"TellmeniJi mia where didst thou meet 
this stranger? " 

"Oh it is long ago. I go to La Mission to 
early mass and when I go in the door there 
sit the Americano, making the pictures, and 
he take off the sombrero and say, 1 Buenas 
dias Senorita,' and I say, 'Buenas dias 
Senor,' because Tia Juana always tell me be 
polite; and then he say, ' Can I go in the 
church?' and I say ' 0 si Senor ' because I 
think it is good for him to go to mass. He 
sit on the bench and I sit on the floor and 
pull the roboso tight around my face and try 
to say the rosary, but Madre de Dios! I feel 
so wicked because every time I look, he look, 
and I hear not the mass and see nothing but 
the Americano; and when the mass is finished 
I come out and he come with me and ask if 
he can walk with the Senorita, and I say 'Si 
Senor ' because he look so gentle, I cannot 
say no. Then he ask me, 1 What is the name, 



Senorita?' and I answer 'Chonita." Then 
he say, ' Chonita — it is very pretty, like the 
music' Then I tell him he must not walk 
very far because Tia Juana get cross, and I 
think maybe we meet Pancho. He say he 
like make picture of the Senorita Chonita, 
and I feel very proud and tell him I will ask 
Tia Juana. The next day when I go to mass 
he is there again and say to me, 'Chonita, 
come this afternoon, put on the lace mantilla 
and the pretty vestido, then I will make pic- 
ture of you.' 0 Padre mia! I have tell the 
lie to Tia Juana, I tell her I have to go to 
confess to Padre Sanchez; I put the lace man- 
tilla under the reboso, when I come he is 
there. Then he tell me 'Stand in the portal, 
Chonita, very still,' and I try to look so pretty 
and he make on the paper with brush and 
picture, then he call me to look, and, car- 
ambaI it is me, Chonita — the same eyes, the 

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Western Graphic 



13 



same hair, everything. Then he tell me his 
name is Reginald, he live in England, that he 
is no Americano but Ixglks, hut I like better 
to call him the Americano, and he is going 
hack to his own country, but he say he is 
come back soon and he like live in this beau- 
tiful California, with me, his Chonita. Then 
he ask for me to give him un besito, and I 
feel su ashamed, but — he is so grand, and — 
Dios de mi alma! He is gone! Padre mia, 
this is why I pray to the Virgin to watch mi 
angel Blanco and bring him back to his 
Chonita." 

During her simple narative the old man 
had listened with bowed head. Evidently this 
was not a case in which mild measures would 
prove useful and yet on second thought he re- 
called the days of his own youth when he had 
been a veritable Don Juan and was as bold as 
the Americano; Chonita had the same lithe- 
ness of figure and grace of movement with 
which the mother had been endowed, and 
among the fair maidens of her day, none 
bore her water jar upon her head or danced 
the contra danza with more grace than did 
the wife now lying cold up there in the campo 
santo. Ay de mi ! Why should she not be 
admired. 



Don Pablo wondered if Chonita had given 
one little thought to Pancho, who while yet 
the two were children, had been chosen for her 
future husband. Little did he dream that 
their manifest destiny had been objected to by 
either, as they grew up out of childhood and 
came to know about it. 

Pancho would have been hard to please in- 
deed had he not been captivated by Chonita 
the handsomest senorita in the valley; and 
Chonita had equal reason to be satisfied with 
Pancho for he was a gallant caballero with 
hair black as night, eyes that were bold yet 
tender, and a natural grace that is the heritage 
of the children of the south, and no one in all 
the country round could sing the plaintive 
"La Golondrina" or "La Paloma " to 
the soft cadence of the guitar with more pas- 
sion and tenderness than could Pancho. 

Chonita continued taking her trouble to 
Our Lady in the chapel, and with all the 
strength of her young heart, prayed that the 
love that was in her might be guided aright, 
and as day after day she came out of the 
dusky church into the golden sunlight, it 
seemed to her that her petition would be an- 
swered, and yet the gentle lady seemed to tell 
her that her thoughts should be of him who 



belonged to her own kind and not for the 
stranger and as she walked down the camino, 
she found herself repeating again and again 
the name Pancho, Panchito, and for the first 
time in a long while her heart seemed to go 
back to her native lover. 

Days came and went and Chonita saw 
nought of her angei bianco. Had she really 
sinned ? she could not think so. The kiss she 
gave him was of farewell; true much of her 
life went out with it, but all that was left 
would be Pancho's and slowly the love that 
had so mastered her faded away as a dream, 
and her love for Pancho grew once more, strong 
and true. 

A year has passed and Chonita has en- 
joyed the dignity of the title Senora. It is 
Sunday and a little procession is wending its 
way toward the mission; the old Franciscan 
meets them at the baptismal font,and the name 
bestowed upon the first born of Pancho and 
Chonita is Reginaldo. 

In one of the most fashionable houses in 
Picadilly, London, in a studio filled with 
works of art, is a little sketch of a Spanish 
maiden and inscribed thereon, in a bold Eng- 
lish hand, are the words: " Chonita — Sketched 
from life, Santa Barbara, Cal." 



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A. PTJISSEGUK, Proprietor MKS, L. LARIEUX, Manageress f 

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14 



In the Gay Life 

FIESTA PARK will take on its old time 
gaiety next Wednesday with the open- 
ing of the first Horse Show. The ladies will 
be resplendent in their most modish gowns 
and millinery and the arena will be bright 
with color and beauty. Our own society folk 
will be augmented bj' parties from San Fran- 
cisco, Itedlands, Pasadena and other "sub- 
urbs." Among the Los Angeles box sub- 
scribers are certain who will ente-tain that 
week and attend each day accompanied by 
little coteries of friends. Mrs. (Governor) 
Gage will be at the opening, as will Mayor 
and Mrs. Eaton and Miss Eaton; F. K. Rule, 
Captain C. E. Thorn, Mr. Garlmd, J. F. 
Francis, Alfred Solano, E. P. Earl, M. S. Sev- 
erance, O P. Posey, H. W. Hellman, Charles 
Forman, A. G. Hunbard, A. C. Bilicke, J. G. 
Mossin, J. J. Fay, G. \V. Luce, J. A. Muir, W. 
S. Hook, J. E. Plater, Count Jaro von Schmidt, 
Thomas P. Bard, Iff. L. Hinman, H. T. Lee, 

H. J. Crocker, R. B. Fithian, L. V. Harkness, 

I. N. Van Nuys, Kaspare Colin, H. Xewmark, 
E. P. Clark, A. Hamburger, F. 0. Johnson, 
H. G. Wilshire, L. J. Rose, F \V. King, S. 
Iffaier, J. Maier, E. P. Ripley, Mrs A. How- 
ard, M. J. Newmark, Abe Haas, W. S. Hobart, 
W. G. Kerckhoff, W. B. Cline, John S. Cra- 
vens, Prince A. Poniatovvski, H. M. Dobbins, 
A. Wilcox, W. S. Newhall, George A. Newhall, 
Homer Laughlin, Graham E. Babcock, M. M. 
Potter, E. M. Ware, Byron Erkenbrecher. 
William Banning and W. L. Vail with their 
wives and guests will all occupy boxes, and 
a!so Mrs. E. Childs, Mrs. Baker, Mrs. P. C. 
Stverance, Mrs. C. W. Dobbins'and the Pasa- 
dena Board of Trade. 

Mrs. Ira O. Smith of West Adams street 
gave a progressive hearts party on Tuesday 
afternoon, ladies being seated at twenty-two 
tables. Assisting in receiving were Mesdames 
Sumner P. Hunt, C. Balch, E. H. Moore, 
Misses Gooding, Fay Clark, McLellan, Stone, 
Gardner and Schroeder. The dowers and 
plants in their arrangement and coloring were 
bewilderingly lovely. One room opening into 
another revealed vistas and glints of reds, 
pinks and yellows, with the ensemble of 
green; roses of queenly crimson nodded from 
basket and "mantel, and vases of deeply blush- 
ing carnations bo-peeped with the ribbons on 
the buffet, while seeming endless chains of 
smilax held the whole in cobweb entourage. 
The score cards were bits of water color, 



Western Graphic 

heart shape and ribbon tied. The prize distri- 
butions were, first, Japanese call bell of bronze 
and gold, Mrs. Darling; second, handsome 
powder box, Mrs. Goodwin; third, Japanese 
box for toilet table, Mrs. White; consolation, 
set of silver and gold salt spoons, Mrs. Hunt. 
A beautiful bon bon box was drawn for by 
the young ladies of the receiving party, and 
fell to Miss Anna Fay. 

Mrs. W. H. Holliday of West Adams 
street gave a small luncheon on Wednesday 
to meet Mrs. Grace Moon Beardsley of Mich- 
igan. The guests were Mesdames J. H. Nor- 
ton, J. F. Foster, Willard Stimson, Victoria 
Harrell, E. T. Earl and John J. Meyler. There 
was a handsome display of pink roses on the 
table and ribbons ran hither and yon with 
bows and ends. 

Mrs. Willard H. Fales of North Chicago 
street asked several ladies informally to 
luncheon on Wednesday to meet her guests, 
Mrs. J. L. Maynard and Mrs. H. L. Russell of 
Boston, daintily spreading the table with lace 
and pink ribbons and vases of " Corbett " car- 
nations. The others of the party were Mrs. 
George Drake Ruddy, Mrs. Shelley Tolhurst 
and Miss Madeline Boles. 

The Midwinter Cotillion Club met Tuesday 
night at Kramer's Hall. The ballroom had 
been simply decorated in green, the palms, 
ferns and foliage plants showing off to best 
advantage against the ivory walls. Witmer's 
orchestra furnished music for the hundred or 
more dancers and the following ladies were 
patronesses: Mesdames Olin Wellborn, Thos. 
Lewis, C. C. Carpenter, C. Modini-Wood, 
George J. Denis, J. M. Elliott, J. Ross Clark, 
C. D. Jones, Wesley Clark, J. J. Fay, A. M. 
Stephens, W. L. Graves and Cameron Erskine 
Thorn. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Hubbell of Aliso street 
will entertain on St. Valentine's evening. 

Mrs. J. D. Works will entertain with cards 
on the afternoon of February the third. 

Mrs. C. E. Thorn of East Third street gave 
another of her delightful box parties and sup- 
pers on Monday evening; the following 
young people attending the Orpheum: Miss 
Nora Sterry, Miss Ella Clark, Miss Millar, 
Miss Mason, Miss Thorn and Messrs. Norman 
Sterry, Albert Stephens, Carroll Allen, Otto 
Gottschalk and Ross Smith. 

Mrs. Victoria Harrell of Figueroa street 
had a box party at the same theater that eve- 
ning, followed by a supper, entertaining Mr. 
and Mrs. Holliday, Mr. and Mrs. Mayler and 
Mr. Innis. 

Mrs Henry T. Gage began her Wednesday 
afternoon receptions at her apartments at the 




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SPRING OF '99 ^ 




]N CALIFOR.NIA winter is such an obsolete season in reality that Western Graphic will christen its big annual 
number, that is to issue the latter part of February, (which in less favored climes would be correctly called "mid- 
winter") "The Spring of '99" edition. This will be an edition of forty or more pages, edited with the most 
painstaking accuracy, illustrated as only the Western Graphic can illustrate and the cover will be a photo-chrome repro- 
duction of a water color painted expressly for the journal by Miss M. E. Curran, a talented young artist of Los An- 
geles. Without exception this will be the finest newspaper cover ever printed in the United States. 

This number will be most entertaining for eastern people and will be sold wrapped for mailing at 25 cents per copy. 
Application for advertising space and orders for copies should be addressed to 

Western Graphic 

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Wosiorn Graphic 



15 



Golden Eagle Hotel, Sacramento, on the 
eighteenth. The rooms were filled with flow- 
ers and thronged with the ladies of the social 
and political life of the Capital. Mrs. Wil- 
liam Beckman gave Governor and Mrs. Gage 
a large box party one evening last week. Mrs. 
Beckman has been a social leader at Sacra- 
mento through several administrations. 

Mrs. O. W. Childs of Hoover street enter- 
tained with cards Friday. The delightful 
afternoon was planned in honor of her guests, 
Mrs. Voorhees and Miss Carr of San Fran- 
cisco. The pretty house was charmingly ar 
ranged for the game, eight tables being placed 
in and about the palms and plants, vases of 
roses and carnations and bowls of violets filling 
all the air with fragrance. A daintily ap- 
pointed and gracefully served luncheon con- 
cluded another of Mrs. Childs' hospitable 
affairs. 

Mrs. Clinton Norman Sterry of Wilshire 
Boulevard, who since her residence in Los An- 
geles has become known as one of our most 
indefatigable entertainers, planning always 
for the pleasure of her friends, was again the 
gracious hostess Friday afternoon, holding 
an "at home" from three to six, to which 
were bidden a large number of guests. In 
the evening the young people of the house, 
Miss Nora and Norman, Jr., gave a 
dance. The orchestra from the Abbots- 
ford Inn furnished music for both the 
reception and cotillion and Reynolds served 
a delicious luncheon and supper. Mrs. 
Sterry was assisted in receiving by Mesdames 
J. G. Mossin, Nevin, Oliver Cosby, Houring, 
Kidder and Childs. The spacious home was 
florally beautiful, delicate traceries of smilax 
intertwining the light woodwork and stand- 
ing out" against the softly tinted frescoes. 



Roses, carnations and violets, hyacinths and 
lillies and all the wealth of the season's gay 
blossoms lent charm, fragrance and color to 
the handsome furnishings and settings of 
palms and potted plants. Among the guests 
of the evening were the Misses Thorn, Bab- 
cock, Farley. Bellini, Schroeder, Booihe, 
Davis, Hunsaker, Muse, (iootirich, the Misses 
Kemper, Mi>s (Jedding, the Misses Wellborn, 
Misses Clark, Carleton, Moony, Sansford, 
Shinn, the Mioses Strong, Misses Brown, 
Perry, Whittaker, the Misses Hotch; Messrs. 
Dr. Filbert, Dr. McGarry, Dr. Smith, Mesers. 
Billings, Overton, Kevins, Bicknell, Lawler, 
the Messrs. Leurst. Philip and ("has. Hender- 
son, the Messrs. Re npers, Messrs. Murrietta, 
Field, Meyer, Carlton, Mcany, Cosby, 
Shinn, Holterhoff, Campbell, Duflill, Vaughn, 
Cerrey, Neal. 

Mrs. James C. Drake and Mrs. Randolph 
H. Miner held a large reception on Thursday 
between the hours of four and six at the resi- 
dence of Mrs. Drake on Hoover street. Two 
hundred invitations were sent out and nearly 
that number of ladies called and were hospit- 
ably entertained. Assisting in receiving were 
Mesdames Wilcox, Longstreet, Hubbard, 
Percy Hoyle, Miss Arguello, Miss Elliott and 
Miss Carrie Winston. Mrs. Barker served 
the chocolate, Miss Margaret Winston the 
ices, Miss Julia Winston the tea, and Miss 
McFarland and Miss Hortense Childs the 
punch. An orchestra was stationed in the 
hall and upon the opening of the street door, 
a waft of violets, a murmur of voices, a soft 
rhythm and a glint of color and light gave the 
incomer a sense of pleasure and greeting. 
Potted plants, ferns and palms were used in 
decoration of the hall and library, the Turk- 
ish "smoker," with its rich oriental upholster- 



ing and jeweled lamps, needing 00 further 
embellishments than the dark woods and 
draperies. The drawing room, on the right, 
was sweetly pretty with California violets, 
lavishly placed on mantel, pedestal and cabi- 
net, while the dining room was done with a 
lighter touch, white and green and silver 
forming an exquisite finish to the blue and 
mahogany walls and woodwork Here the 
table was spread, wax like hyacinths nodding 
their lily bells amid a miniature forest of 
maidenhair, their heavy perfume rising as an 
incense and filling all the place. Tall, silver 
candelabra, brightlv burning tapers under 
green shades, rose at either end, shedding a 
pale radiance over the blossom-strewn cloth. 
The decorations were under the direition of 
Mrs Annie Bancroft, who, seldom, if ever, 
finds a residence that lends itself so readily to 
her artistic desire for perfection of detail — 
many lengths of Japanese embroideries and 
oriental hangings being placed at her disposal 
and used with striking effect about the stair- 
way and hall. Panoramas of beautiful pict- 
ures succeeded one another in the glimpses of 
flower trimmed and wax lighted rooms, 
glinting in the bravery of crystal and silver 
and gay with the throngs of handsomely- 
gowned women. 

Mrs. Max Meyberg of West Twenty-eighth 
street gave a large card party Friday after- 
noon. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Plater of the Baker 
block are in Sin Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Garland of West 
Adams street, accompanied by Bobert Bowan, 
went to Coronado this morning. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hinman will return with them next 
week and remain over the horse show and 
polo matches. 



LOS ANGELES 

Assay OTTIgc and Mining E,xGiianoe 



C C. DEAN, MANAGER 

Assaying a Specialty Low Rates and Accuracy 
MINES EXAMINED AND SAMPLED 



JOSEPH MAIER 

President and Tre&s 

Home 
Industry 



(iEORGK ZOBELEIN 

Vlce-Prea. and Sec y 

Keep Money 
at Home 



149 N'OKTII MAIN si . 

I; ...in - r> i ... I c 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



MAIER & 

ZOBELEIN 




Rave You bad Your CQltltCr Suit ? I 444 ALISO STREET 



TEL. 91 



LOS ANGELES, CAL 



JNfced.. 



ONE OF KELLfl/VTS 

Business 
Suits 

362 S. Broadway 

Corner 1th Street 



$15.00 




,••>»•»>»•».;»:•....:«:' » » 



*>:;«X:»»>: » .« > ■ > > t;v-,>;;.;. 



Our Wines flre unexcelled 

They are selected from the finest Sonoma Valley anil Southern California 
Vintages. 

Our prices make them within the reach of every purse. A trial will 
convince you. 

Old Sonoma Claret 35c gal I Wines in bottle*, the 50c kind, 

Old 8onoma Zinfandel, very fine 41c ,,'al I per bottle, 25c 

5-year-old Port 50c gal I Good Whisky in bnlk $190 gal 

6 '' Sherry, Angelica (i Muscat, 65c gal I Quart Bottle of Fine Whiaky 75c 

All other goods in proportion. 
We carry a full line of FINE LIQUEURS 
Eastern shipments a specialty. 



EDWARD GERMAIN WINE CO 4 



397-399 S. Los Angeles St 



Tel. n. 919 
No bar In con- 
nection 
Free Delivery 



California 
Limited... 



Santa Fe 
Route 



The Fastest Regular Train E,ver Run Across tlie Continent 

HAVE YOU NOTICED THE SCHEDULE? coxnk mm; trains 

... j „ Arrives Omaha - ■ fi 00 a.m . Thur. Sat. Tue*. 
Leaves Los Angeles 1.20 p.m. Mon. \\ cd. Sat. Arr|vellSt i .„„ . . 7 00 a.m. Thnr. Sat. Tucs. 
Arrives Denver - ■ 6 00 p.m. Wed. Frl. Mon. Arrives Fort \\ 'h - H.00 a.m. Thnr. Sat. Tnca. 
Arrives Kansas City - 9 10 p.m. Wed Frl. Mon. Arrives St Paul - • 7 00 p.m. Thur. Bat. Tuea. 
Arrives (hlcago - - 9 ,8B a m. Thnrs. Pat. Tuea. Arrives New York ■ 1.30 p.m. Frl. Hun. Wed. 

Arrives Boston - - :t.0i> p.m. Frl. Sun Wed 

The California Limited Is made up of the highest clasa of equipment Is lighted by eleetrlrlly 
iind carries composite and observation cars with every accommodation for ladies and gentlemen. 
The Dining car gives une-ioaled service. 

This splendid train Is for first-class travel only, hut there Is no extra ctnrge beyond the regu 
lar ticket and sleeping car rate «'i<' Is In addition to the regular Dally 0 vcrlmi.l I x press 
which eairles both Pullman Palace and tourist cars through to Chicago. 



II K. <;K F.fJOK Y. A-st Ccn'l Passenger AiM 
8. C. and 8. Fe. P. roads. I,os Angeles. 



JSO. .1. HYKN K. (ien'l Passenger Agt. 

H. (.' and S. Fe P. roads. Los Angeles 



HOTEL RflMONfl 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Most Centrally l.ocnted. Flrst-chias it Modern Kates 

Cor. Spring and Third Streets 

F. B. MALLORY, Prop. 



EASTERN STAR LAUNDRY 



We <lo Fine Work ami do not wear out the 



.0 -t^'-.t. 



♦ 817 EAST 5th STREET 

G. G. CEZAR, Proprietor 




Aotinaldo, the troublesome Poo Bah of the Philippines who o nee 
sold out his followers for half a million Mexican dollars. 



WE ARE SOLE AGENTS FOR LIBBY'S CUT GLASS 




FOF Table Decoration nothing has yet been found to equal 
Rich Cut Glass. People of refinement and culture all pay 
tribute to its sparkling beauty. All the finest collections are 
largely made up of LIBBY'S cuttings — the most famous makers 
of the world. 

AT THIS TIME WE ARE OFFERING OUR 
ENTIRE STOCK AT REDUCED PRICES 

Step in and Look it Over 



H. F. Vollmer & Co. 

116 South Spring Street. 



DIRECT 
IMPORTERS 



McCALL'S Patterns are Perfect 




Dress Patterns at $2.45 

Here's an exceptional line of more than twenty-five styles 
in dress patterns, bought from the mills at a price they would 
have laughed at sixty days ago. The assortment includes Fancy 
Cheviots, Novelty Mixtures, German Suitings and other weaves 
and color effects that are just suited to this season of the year. 

You cannot find a thread of cotton in the entire lot and 
many patterns are silk-mixed. Serviceable, stylish, new and 
only $2.45 for a full pattern. Equal them short of $3.50 if you 
can. 

Dress Goods Remnants at exactly one-half our yardage price 

317=325 SOUTH BROADWAY 

Between Third and Fourth Street 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 




"It looks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 



Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & MOFFITT 



WENDELL EASTON 
President 



GEORGE EASTON 

Vice-President 



GEO. D. EASTON 

Secretary 



ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK 
Treasurer 



moNELOKiDGtafo 



tfUtSTJITEAGlt/rS 4 

QtHERAl/JUCrtOj/fffi;, 



Be tip to date and invest your money where it will bring quick 
returns. Invest in the most attractive part of the city, the 

MENLO PARK TRACT 

Large Lots. Streets Improved. Two Car Lines, but twelve minutes 
from business center. Nobby homes building in every block. 

It will pay you to call on us. 

EASTON ELDMDGE & Co. 



121 SOUTH BROADWAV 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



?re»8 of leo. Eice & Bone (Inc.) 311 313 New High Street 



Western Graphic 




COPY RIGHTED 180B 



\ ulumc VI. 
Number 5. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, February 4, 1899. 

^The Horse that Guide the Golden Eye of Heaven, 
cAnd blow the cMorning from their Nostrils- -Marloiv 



Edition de Luxe 
lo Cents a Copy 




"THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS" 



By permisssion II. C. Lichtenberger, Art Emporium 
Engraved by American Engraving Co. 



Kngraved expressly for Wkstkhn Graphic from n steel print 
of the famous painting by L. K. Herring, 8r. 



2 



Western Graphic 



FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 



Western Graphic 



Published Ever}- Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 

311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Entered at the postoffice In Los Angeles as second-class mail matter. 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. 

Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe. Pei Copy Ten Cents. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 




fl Chance 
For Men. . . 



Single 



We Solicit Contributions of Short Stories and Articles of Interest about Southern 
California, which we will pay for at our regular rates The usual 
rules regarding Anonymous Contributions and 
Rejected Mss. will be observed. 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



w 



The illustration shows the 
shoe, but the quality is 
even more desirable than 
the style. Tan Wiillow Calf, of the best wear- 
ing grade it is possible to buy, hand-sewed welt 
soles and excellent lining, the exact proper style: 
" Blucher." You'll have hard work to find their 
equal at $5: We say gQ 

nnes-GriDPen Shoe Go. 

258 So. Broadway 231 W. Third St. 




♦ A. OUiphur OpringS and Baths 



i 

Cor. Mat y and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. 



Bakery 



LEADVILLE BAKERY 



W H Mayo, formerly at 82(! \V. Pico St., has re- 
moved to 546 S. Spring St. If not convenient 
for you to call on us at our new p'.ace. 'please 
leave your street and number so our wagon 
can stop at your home. 

Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa' e mas- 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair 
Goods of all kinds. Thy Ckeme »e Acacia 
Skin food. 224-226 W. Second St. 



Electrical Contractors 
WOODILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 
Electrical Supplies and Heating Appliances. We 
give special intention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 108 W. Third St. 

TsUCPHOKB Main 1125. 

Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Make fine halftones. linecutB, embossing plates 
newspaper cuts— just any hing you want en- 
graved. See them at the Times Building, I.os 
Angeles. 



£ These Baths are recommended by tbe medical profession for the cure of 
Sj Kidney ana Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. 

A. PUISSEGUK, Proprietor MRS. L. LAKIEUX, Manageress 



Oldest and Largest Hank in Southern 
California 



Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

327 So. Spring St are selling the old reliable 
Hoffman and have added tbe Tribune (blue 
streak) to their line. Wheels from $25 00 up. 

Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULEY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker Magazine , 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115*4 N. Main St., LOS Asgki H 

Boots and Shoes 

H.C. BLANEY 

Boots and Shoes for Ladies, Gents. Mis«es, Boys, 
Children, and Infants. Prices reasonable. 

352 S. Si'itiNi; St. Los Anuei.es 



Grillework 

JNO. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S. Broadway. 



Kodak Supplies 
F. L 



DUNGAN 



Business College 





226 So. Spring St., Los Angeles Cal. In session 
all the year students enter any day. 

Carpet Cleaning 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet," Ax. 
minster. Moquette Carpets, Fine Hugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpels taken up, cleaned 
and laid. 611 south Broadway, Phone M. 217 
ROBT. Jordan 



Dancing School 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL 

For Dancing; 

The Glide system. A class will organize for be- 
ginners Wed. eve. .Ian. 25. Residence 1022 S. 
Bonnie Bra". Academv Sixth and Broadway, 
Illinois Hall. Los An geles Tel. Ghees 12'jl 

Dermatologist 

JOSEPHINE R0DD0N 

Shampooing and scalp treatment Bust and 
neck development a specialty. Medicated 
baths. Facial treatment. Agent for Mrs. Nettie 
Harrison's goods. 321 WSST FOURTH St. 



The most complete Stock in Southern Califor 
nia. First-eia-s Developing and Finishing our 
Specialty. :i07 W. Foikth St., near Broadway. 

Printing 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

The largest and best equipped in Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halltone and photo-chrome 
printing a specially. 

311-313 New High St. - - Los Angeles 

Real Estate 

" Hayne Hods the bargains " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading Heal Kstate Agents 

US West Fot'RTH St. - LosAngei.es 

Schoil of Shorthand 

The Great Shorthand Revolution 

Gregg's Light Line Shorthand 

Principles acquired in ten easy lessons. Students 
write fin to 80 words a minute with five weeks' 
instruction. [MSl'1'1'0 1 ■ 840% S Bioadwav. 

Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon. Specialist for women 
Office hours: 9 to 12 M. 2 to 5 and 7 to » P. M. 
Sundays. 10 to 12 M. 

540% S. Spring St. - - I os angeCes 



uiu v* muiijniiuio i)(J 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) 8500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total $1,426,742 

OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

G. HEIMANN Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry ('. E. Tbom A. Glassell 

O. W. Childs L W. Hellman, Jr. L N.Van Nuys 

J. F. Francis H W. Hellman L W. Hellman 

♦^-Special Collection Department. Oursafety 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent in its new fire and burglar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 



Main Street Savings Bank 

Junction of Main, Spring aud Temple Sts. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED J200.000 

APITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUE President 

I. N. VAN NUYS Vice-President 

B. V. DUQUE Cashier 

Directors — H. W. Hellman, Kasper Cohn, EL 
W. O'Melveny, J. B. Lankershim, O. T. Johnson, 
T. L. Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. G. Kerckhoff, A. 
Haas. 



Trusses 



W. W. SWEENEY 



Expert maker and fitter of Trusses, Elastic Hos- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. ihe only 
manufacturer iu S. Ciliforni-). Rimemberthe 
Dumber, 313 S. Spring St. Under Ramona 
Hotel. 



Druggist 



W. W. BOSWELL 



Undertakers 

BRESEE BROTHERS CO. 

Funeral Directors. Broadway nnd Sixth Sts 
Priva e Ambulance. Lady Assistant. The best 
service and the lowest prices. 

Tel. Main 243 - - - LosAngei.es 



Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals. Toilet Articles. 
Fancy Goods, Skins, Sponges, Brushes, Combs, 
Perfumery, Physicians' Prescriptions careiully 
compounded. Tel. G 1372. Foi i:th and Hn.l.. 

Dental Parlors 

DR. FRANK STEVENS 

Open Evenings anil Sundays. Electric light 

used evenings. Tel. Green 93 
324* South spring St. - - LOB A NOBLES 



Wood-Carpet 

JNO. A. SMITH 

$1.25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
Floors, Strip tloors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well iu new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
ami permanent. 707 S. Broadway. 



Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estat; in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from f 10,000 to £500,000 avail- 
able for investment oa mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



NOTICK OF FOKECLOSUKK S A 1.1 : 

Sherifl'sSale, No. 31,963. 
Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation), plaintiff, vs. Lizzie M. 1 alton. 
defendant. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale. 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Courl of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
state of California, on the 20th day of January, 
A. I)., 1899, in the above entitled action, where- 
in Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation ) the above named plaintiff, 
obtained a judgment and decree of foreclosure 
and sale against Lizzie M. Dalton, defendant, on 
the lfith day of Januarv, A. D. ".8»9, for the sum of 
Three Hundred and Forty-three «i 10-100(8343 10) 
Dollars, lawful money of the United States, 
which said decree was, 011 the 20th day oi 
January, A. D 1899, recorded in Judgment 
Hook 82 of said Court, at page 12. I am com- 
manded to sell all the certain lot, piece, or 
parcel of land situate, lying and being in the 
county of Los Angeles, state of California, and 
bounded and de^ribed as follows: 

Lot Number one (1), Block "A" of the Ninth 
Street Tract Extension, as per map recorded in 
Book 55, pages 89 and 90 of Miscellaneous Rec- 
ords of said county of Los Angeles, together 
with t'.'.e tenements, hereditaments and appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging, or in anywise ap- 
pertaining. 

Public notice is hereby given that on Tuesday, 
the Nth day of February, A. D. 1899. at 12 o'clock 
M of that day, in front of the Court House dooi 
of the county of I.os Angeles, Broadway entrance, 
I w ill, In obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure -aud sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with interest 
and cost-, etc. . to the highest and best bidder, 
for cash lawful monev of the U. S. 

Dated this 20th day'oi Januarv, 1899. 

W. A'. HA MM EL 
Sheriff of Los Angeles Cauntv 

By JOHN R. SLATER Deputy Sheriff. 

Miller ,V. Brown, Attorneys for Plaintiff. 



the J^osslyn 



Main Street opp. Post Office 

The finest equipped Hotel at Moderate 

rates in 

LOS ANGELES 

140 Elegant Rooms — with steam heat, 
telephones, hot and cold running water, 
and light and air in every room. 

Electric Elevator, Continuous service. 
70 sunny suits with private baths. Super- 
ior dining room service. 

ltates American Plan #3 to S3 pei day 
Ratal European Plan SI per day up 



Electric cars to depots and all points of interest 
Public and Private Parlors Orchestra music 
duriug dinner hours. 

A BN EK Li BOSS, Pi op. 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



V: Los Angeles, Saturday, February 4, 1899. 



Volume 
Number 




GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

ben. c. truman :-: :-: :-: editor 




IT REQUIRED no affidavits nor other 
proofs than the figures to sustain the 
declaration made by Governor Gage immedi- 
ately after the general election that the elee- 
mosynary managers of the Senatorial aspira- 
tions of U. S. Grant had "knifed" the gen- 
eral ticket in order to make sure of legislative 
successes in various portions of the State and 
particularly in San Diego county. The facts 
of the ''knifing" paraded themselves along 
with the other salient features. 

But were anything wanting to further sus- 
tain the courageous utterances of the Gov- 
ernor, who had performed as glorious work 
for the whole ticket — nobody barred— as for 
himself, and who had fe!t as righteously in- 
dignant over the Iscariot handiwork of the 
aforesaid eleemosynary managers, it has been 
demonstrated in the admission of Mr. Grant, 
himself, that he had invested between $20,000 
and $30,000 in booming the very legislative 
districts blacklisted by Mr. Gage. 

Most all men old enough to vote are aware 
of the fact that the expenditure of enormous 
sums of money like the above, and for a like 
purpose, even if no real trades are projected, 
means the exaltation of certain portions of a 
ticket to the discomfiture of otheis. In other 
words it means premeditated mischief for all 
who are candidates honestly striving for the 
success of the whole ticket. 

Every iota of evidence from the commence- 
ment of the campaign to the close of the in- 
vestigation on Saturday last proved conclu- 
sively that the general ticket was sent a floun- 
dering in San Diego for the benefit of the 
legislative portion thereof. There were those 
who feared the Governor had been mistaken 
in bis positive denunciation of the tactics in- 
dulged in in San Diego, but now all these 
agree that he was strictly correct in all his 
statements, and that even more vigorous 
language would have been inadequate in the 
proper excriation of creatures so unmindful 
of those sacred political requirements as to 
have endangered by their perfidy the whole 
ticket had not the head thereof carried it 
through by his whirlwind methods of cam- 
paigning and magnificent magnetic person- 
ality. It should be a lesson to all political 
nominees of all parties to be dead on the 
square and campaign vigorously and honestly 
for the whole ticket and not for fragmentary 
portions thereof. Political perfidy is as vicious, 
as rebellious and as infamous as any other 
perfidy, even if it fail of ignominious pur- 
pose. Benedict Arnold was no less a traitor 
because his scheme of treason failed. Judas 
only received a small sum for his treachery, 



but he is the most despicable creature of any 
time. 

There are times when the Congress of the 
United States surprises one by its extreme 
littleness and seeming disregard of public 
opinion. For instance, the announcement 
comes that certain economical members of 
the House are campaigning against the ap- 
propriation of prize money to the sailors who 
fought so gallantly and so gloriously in the 
late war. To be sure there is much in this 
prize money method that is open to objection. 
It is a reminder of the days when pirates 
sailed the seas and flung their ensign of cross- 
bones and skull from the topmast— it suggests 
the days of scuttling and sinking and killing 
— the days of men with cutlass and horse 
pistol and knife, and causes at least the 
slightest of cold shivers and cold blood. Be- 
sides, sailors ought to do their duty just as 
soldiers do; and there is, therefore, no more 
reason for paying them a bonus for ships they 
capture than there is for giving soldiers a 
bonus for towns they take or for battles they 
win. The spectacle of a big battleship chas- 
ing a fishing smack for the prize money there 
is in it is neither edifying nor proper. But 
that has nothing to do with the question at 
this time. The laws prescribing prize money 
were on the statute books at the time of the 
war and they amounted to a bargain between 
the Nation and the sailors. Now that the 
fighting is over it would be a piece of despica- 
ble meanness for the government to withhold 
the money which in effect it had promised 
the men. Unfortunately the law fixes the 
manner of distributing the money, and it is 
necessary for Congress to make an appropria- 
tion, which gives the demagogues and nig- 
gardly members a chance to display their un- 
fairness and illiberality. The prize money 
should be promptly appropriated and paid 
over for the sake of the honor of the Nation. 
Then let Congress repeal the prize laws if it 
deems them barbaric or an otherwise relic of 
the past. 

And in this connection we would say that 
public sentiment is not back of the Senate's 
hesitancy to confirm Lieutenant Hobson's 
promotion. Lieutenant Hobson's nomination 
for lieutenant-commander is now in the Sen- 
ate, which body has refused to confirm it be- 
cause of objections, or alleged objections from 
the Navy. The objections are based on the 
ground that the kissing episodes in which 
Lieutenant Hobson has played a conspicuous 
part in several cities are undignified and a re- 
flection on the good sense of the whole naval 
personnel. This would be sound were Lieu- 
tenant Hobson on trial for conduct unbecom- 
ing an officer, or were simply questions of 
decorum and etiquette under discussion. 
But they are not when the lieutenant's pro- 
motion is considered. While the sight of a 
national hero resolving himself into a kissing 
post is not one likely to edify either the hero 
or the public, it is insignificant compared to 
the service the hero has performed for the Na- 
tion. If Lieutenant Hobson had stipulated 
that he would risk his life to blockade the 
harbor of Santiago for a given number of 
kisses, it is highly probable that he would 



le Luxe 
a Copy 

have been awarded the contract and the world 
would have pronounced it a bargain. 
Nothing that Lieutenant Hobson has done 
in the osculating line can permanently dim 
the glory he won by sinking the Merrimac. 
If he has been indiscreet in little things the 
Senate should not be ungrateful and ungen- 
erous in recognizing the biggest thing on 
earth — American heroism. 

And this brings us to another phase of 
American naval incongruities that we trust 
will soon be classified among the eliminations 
of a progressive age — we mean the standard 
controversy between staff and line. There is 
a bill now in hand to reorganize the personnel 
of the navy and amalgamate the engineer and 
line corps of the naval service. At one time 
it was feared that much opposition would 
develop to the measure; but this does not 
appear to have been the case, as it secured 
a good majority in the lower house of Con- 
gress, although it is likely to meet with some 
opposition when it reaches the Senate. The 
bill promises to settle the old controversy be- 
tween the line and the staff by granting posi- 
tive rank to the staff officers, although this 
concession is coupled with the proviso that 
they shall exercise command only within their 
own corps. This places the naval staff offi- 
cers on the same footing as the staff officers of 
the army. The bill, when it passes finally, 
will practically eliminate the engineer officer 
as an engineer. Naval engineers will be 
merely experts, and the real work of the 
engine room will fall upon warrant officers, 
whereas the command of the engine-room 
divisions will devolve upon line officers. 
While there can be no objection to giving en- 
gineer officers positive rank and the right to 
command their own men, the wisdom of plac- 
ing line officers in charge of the engine-room 
may be questioned. 

It is no wonder that those democrats that 
voted for McKinley and prosperity and that 
have come into the republican party to re- 
main are thoroughly gratified at the outcome 
of 1896 and the prospect of national riches 
such as were never anticipated by the most 
ardent lover of his country and the party of 
progress, protection and prosperity. And now 
comes the Treasury Department's report for 
November showing that the exports of the 
United States for the eleven months of 1898 
reached $1,117,681,199— a round $100,000,000 
a month — exceeding the imports by $537,337,- 
046. This is what makes our country rich 
This is what makes money cheap and what 
sends abroad the superabundance of Ameri 
can capital seeking investment; this is what 
piles up our bank clearances into tremendous 
figures and puts the gold reserve so high that 
people no longer care to know the exact 
amount. If ever there was a time when an 
American felt proud of his country — when 
finance, war.peace and internal improvements 
were all harmoniously top-notched— it is this 
day of our Lord, and when we of Los Angeles 
have McKinley for our President, Gage for 
our Governor and Waters [for our next Con- 
gressman. Is any one kicking at all ? 

Ik anyone has fault to find with this week's 
GRAPHIC, please send the same in in writing. 



4 



Western Graphic 



Zown TTalfc and prattle 

NOT all club men take their dinners at 
their clubs — I mean the bachelor 
club men, of course, for the married men 
must go home, of course; if they did not there 
would be Hades to pay, of course." 

These words were uttered by a club man 
who has been for a quarter of a century a 
member of the leading clubs in San Francisco 
and a visitor to clubs all over the East and in 
Europe. 



from time to time gives his opinion of some 
current scandal. 

"The Married Member dines at the club 
on Monday to escape the washing day dinner 
at home. He is always in a good humor; he 
sits anywhere,, by the side of anybody; he 
finds everything excellent — "much better 
than in his own home" (it would be a pity if 
it were not), and is surprised that anyone 
can complain of the cuisine; he declares that 
the dinner is too cheap; that the table costs 
the club enormously, and that the married 
men pay for luxuries that bachelors enjoy. 
The Married Member washes down his dinner 
with sauterne. bordeaux, burgundy and oham- 



Chicago and New York, and out at Westlake 
thousands of men and women were to be seen 
Sunday, and most of them without the sign 
of a coat or other wrap. The person who 
thinks he can improve on our winter weather 
ought to be handcuffed to the one who is try- 
ing to improve on the American flag. 

"It seems to me," says Walter Maxwell, 
" that if Charlie Eagan had it to do over 
again he would not be so explicit in locating 
the various points at which a man lies." Re- 
garding the reported resignation of Secretary 
Alger John F. Francis says that if "such an 
event were possible the country would also be 




We were dining at Illich's on Thursday 
evening, and Jerry had given orders that one 
course should be a tenderloin of steak a la 
Chateauhriand, and my friend discussed club 
men somewhat as follows: 

" The Bachelor Member spends his life at 
the club, makes it his home, animates it, 
maketi it agreeable, and gives it a charm even to 
those who only visit it occasionally. He dines 
regularly at a special table with a few choice 
spirits. If an intruder or newly elected mem- 
ber, ignorant of these customs, usurps this 
place, the Bachelor Member makes a few re- 
marks to the steward behind the scenes, and 
goes off in a rage. Woe betide the hapless 
man who is guilty of such an error. It would 
be best for him not to put anyone up for elec- 
tion for a year. The Bachelor Member is 
rather cranky regarding the cuisine; he com- 
ments upon the menu, and complains that 
there is no variety. He cries out incessantly 
at the high price of his dinner, and maintains 
that the only use of a club is to enable its 
members to live economically. He never 
leaves the city, is gay, a good liver, a good 
talker, has the run of all the theaters, some- 
times goes behind the scenes, and interests 
himself in the young ladies of the ballet. 
He is a man of the world by birth, affilia- 
tions and personal appearance. He seldom, 
or never, goes into society, where he is, how- 
ever, very much appreciated. He is perfectly 
informed of all that takes place there, and 



L. V. HARKSES3' SWEM. FOUR -IX- HAND AND BRAKE. 

pagne, smokes a cigar of impossible costliness, 
and generally finishes his evening by paint- 
ing the town. He always puts the menu in 
his pocket, so as to have a little scene next 
day with his wife, with documentary evidence 
as to the inferiority of her cook. 

"The Temporary Member who wishes to 
be re-elected at the end of his three months, or 
intends to be a permanent member, shows an 
exaggerated politeness. He walks through 
the rooms, hat in hand, shakes hands inces- 
santly, professes to be encharted with every- 
thing, find3 the most ridiculous things ador- 
able, plays high, loses every time, and endures 
bores with admirable stoicism; dines at the 
club often, always in full dress and white tie, 
and returns after the theater. Avenges him- 
self when when he is elected a permanent 
member for the constraint he imposes upon 
himself as a temporary one." 

THERE is nothing that gives Los Angeles 
so metropolitan an air as the concerts out at 
Westlake Park and the concourse of people 
drawn thither. Thousands go there on foot, 
in carriage, by car and on wheel, and the 
scene about four o'clock of a Sunday after- 
noon is radiant and enlivening. Few houses 
were to be seen anywhere near Westlake five 
years ago, but now there are hundreds, and 
many of them are among the stateliest and 
costliest in the city. Here it is, midwinter, 
and colder than Greenland in Boston and 



resigned without any great loss of sleep." 
General Last declares that "it is taking more 
time for the Senate to ratify the peace treaty 
than was needed for the army and navy to 
make the treaty possible." In St. Louis there 
is a number of newspaper reporters on the 
police — that is they are made specials and 
given clubs and pistols. "How this would 
work in this city," says Homer Earle, " where 
reporters are sometimes too handy with their 
guns, I cannot say; but the force would be 
the gainer." "Some men always boast of 
what they are going to do," exclaims Walter 
Parker, "but I have always noticed that a 
hen never cackles until after she lays the 
egg." " Every mother," says Frank Burnett, 
"thinks there is no baby like her own, and 
every other mother is mighty glad of it." 



Southern Camfoknia, an illustrated 
brochure, by Charles A. Keeler, depicting 
scenes along that most admirable transconti- 
nental highway, the Santa Fe Railroad, has 
been received at this office, and is by all odds 
one of the most delightful, instructive and 
entertaining I have seen for many a day. 
The descriptions are correct and graphic and 
the illustrations fetching and perfect. And, 
better than all other things, the traveler over 
the Santa Fe, after reading Mr. Keeler's book, 
feels that the author neither drew the long 
bow regarding scenery nor exaggerated the 
comforts and other excellencies of the Sauta 



Western Graphic 



5 



Fe route. It is one of the few pieces of long- 
distance rail where all of the conveniences of 
hotel life are_ furnished, and where all the 
enticing promises of folder and schedule are 
abundantly carried out. 

It will be remembered by many that there 
was a joint celebration of the Blue and the 
Grey in this city on Washington's Birthday 
last, and that it was one of the most honest, 
heartfelt, harmonious celebrations that has 
ever taken place in this or any other city. 



tended to set apart that day as a celebration 
of their own, have met and arranged for a 
meeting on the birthday of Abraham Lincoln 
so as not to conflict with the splendid expecta- 
tions of the gallant fellows' "who fought, 
bled and died" against each other nearly forty 
years ago. 

On Saturday last there was a big crowd of 
members and guests out at the Country Club, 
and there was a recherche combination of 
golf, tea, conversation and music. There was 



Tuttle, Porter, Drake, Miner, Longstreet, 
Percy Hoyle, Carpenter, Ferd Rule, J. F. 
Francis, Misses Childs, Grace Cole, Florence 
Silent, Vail, McCrae and Crouch. There will 
be another gathering this afternoon, weather 
permitting, and succeeding Saturdays for a 
number of weeks. 




HELPMATE AND CAPTAIN, A HANDSOME TEAM ENTERED BY L. V. HARKNESS, OF NEW YORK. 

Since that time the Blue and the Grey have 
been in a war against a foreign power and 
such eminent southern names as Lee, Wheel- 
er, Hood, Gordon and Butler were emblazoned 
under the Star Spangled Banner, and tremen- 
dous deeds of heroism were performed by the 
grandest of all Union armies. The other 
evening a committee of G. A. R. and others 
met for the purpose of another celebration 
and the committee on program made a partial 
report which was earnestly received and time 
further given for perfection of detail. It was 
decided to make the coming event a joint 
Union and Confederate celebration and to 
have a parade of which Col. Allen was elected 
grand marshal, with power to select his own 
aides. After a discussion as to the best means 
to be employed in the continuance of the 
pleasant meetings between soldiers of the 
northern and southern armies, on motion of 
Col. Crane a committee of eleven was ap- 
pointed by the chair to take the preliminary 
steps in forming a chartered order of the 
Blue and the Grey, to report at the next meet- 
ing. The committee was appointed as follows: 
Col. L. P. Crane, Dr. W. H. Harrison, Col. 
Henry Glaze, Gen. Johnstone Jones, C. F. 
Derby, Capt. A. M. Fulkerson, Capt. A. M. 
Thornton, Capt. S. R. Thorpe, J. M. Van 
Horn, W. J. Reed, Gen. J. L. Beveridge. A 
committee consisting of Mrs. Henry Glaze, C. 
F. Derby and Mrs. Prindle, was appointed to 
device a suitable blue and grey badge, to re- 
port at the next meeting. The meeting ad- 
journed until Thursday evening next at 7:30, 
room 224 Stimson bui'ding, to which all ex- 
Union and Confederate soldiers and sailors 
are welcome. Already a large number of the 
members of the Loyal Legion, who had in- 



The Chamber of Commerce will have its 
annual banquet on the 22nd of February — 
Washington's Birthday — and among the in- 
vited guests will be General Shafter, one of 
the great heroes of El Caney and San Juan 
Hill. The Loyal Legion will also entertain 
General Shafter during his presence in Los 
Angeles. 

Among the distinguished arrivals during 
the week was Senator Stephen M. White, who 
was obliged to run back here for a few days to 
attend to some private business, leaving his 
treaty vote paired with some colleague who is 
in favor of ratification. The Senator was in- 
terviewed by the Times and Herald and he 
was, as ever, emphatically opposed to the war, 
the treaty and the whole outfit. 

There is at the Orpheum this week in a 
bit of local comedy an actor who has a past — 
a glorious past — I mean Barton Hill, who is 
not only actor, but scholar, traveler and gen- 
tlemen; who has in bis day played Claude, 
Armand, Hamlet and Richelieu; who has 
played Richmond and Macduff to Forrest's 
Richard and Macbeth; Mercutio to Daven- 
ports's Romeo, Iago to McCullough's Othello 
and Cassius to the Brutus of Booth. Thirty 
odd years ago also saw this splendid actor in 
romantic characters in the romantic plays of 
that day. Asa stage manager he was always 
in a front rank and was considered one of the 
best and most reliable on the American stage. 
He was one of the most punctillious gentle- 
men in the profession, and he has never been 
known to commit a breach of manners in the 




DKFENDEK, ONE OF L. V. HARKNESS' PKTS. 



some good playing by Orr, Cosby, Way, Grind- 
lay, and some good umpiring and entertain- 
ing by Hugh Vail and J. F. Sartori. There were 
other less exciting games than those by the 
above named putters and among the ladies 
present there were Mesdames Jack Griffith 
and Dwight Whiting, who presided at the tea 
tables, and Mesdames Ed. Silent, Otheman 
Stevens, J. R. Thomas, A. C. Balch, J.T.Jones, 
Monroe, Burnett, Holliday, J. R. Koepfli, 
Seward Cole, Jauch, Norton, Newhall, Vail, 



whole course of his life. He is one of the 
most scholarly persons on the stage and con- 
verses in French as fluently as in English. 
He is also whole souled as well as courteous 
and has enjoyed the pathways of Bohemian- 
isn when emancipation from responsibilities 
have permitted. Hill is also an Epicure, and 
many a time have we — the writer and McCul- 
lough and Tavernier, the artist, and the sub- 
ject of this screed — sat down to a breakfast or 
dinner, at the Poodle Dog, fit for the gods. It 
is pleasant to know that one has had the ac- 
quaintance of such a man. 



6 



Western Graphic 




[Photo by <iraham] 
ONE OF HOBART'S GROOMS. 



HORSE SHOW SNAP SHOTS 

The noises heard at the show occasionally 
were not on account of any row or dynamite 
disturbances — only just the entire force try- 
ing to scare Tadpole over the hurdle. 

Peter Martin 
gray sack, wrinkled 
up the back, som- 
brero to match. 

Andrew Martin, 
Palm Springs tailor 
suit.Stephen Childs 
silk bat and white 
carnation. Captain 
Lankershim, Pic- 
cadilly derby and 
Strand overcoat 
walking stick, al- 
ways agreeable. 
Walter Hobart, 
blue suit, dove puff 
tie, spotted "wes- 
cut," pink carna- 
tion. Hands worn 

in pockets. No slouch, though. Urbane and 
punctillious. Charlie Hastings, evening dress, 
a la band-box. Captain Overton, light over- 
coat and Fedora hat, has an eye to the ladies. 
Dr. Wills, afternoon dress, light trousers, 
crimson carnation. Sweet smile. Don't mean 
it. Marco Hellman (J. M. H.), soft felt hat, 
white gloves, carnation and regulation evening 
dress. Alfred Wilcox, carefully arranged tie, 
immaculate evening dress, University club 
manners. 

Count von Schmidt, light overcoat, pink 
carnations. Always courtly and affable. Sib- 
ley Severance, Equestrian suit, crop, tan gloves 
and crush hat. Is a swell, but not a howling 
one. Frank Carolan, light box coat, violet 
cluster boutonnaire, black moustache, Pull- 
man satisfaction. 

Ned Greenway, cotillion costume concealed 
by Inverness. Carnation in buttonhole. Has 
a business attachment to all social strings. 
Richard Dickinson, long overcoat, light hat 
creased through the crown. Gloves and stick. 
Is a pink of good manners. 

The ringmas- 
ter, Graham, the 
superb, who nev- 
er loses his en- 
semble of dig- 
nity, affability, 
authority and 
superiority, got 
a little facetious 
after the col- 
lapse of the al- 
fresco canopy 
Thursday and 
declared, sotto 
voce, that "the 
boasted climate 
of Southern Cal- 
ifornia deserves 
a roast — " and 
no one denied 
it, by the way. 
And it got a 
roast right then and there. 

Tadpole may become a success as a high 
jumper when he changes his form. 

The quiet, modest, affable and unassuming 
ways, combined with delightful manners, 
immaculate appearance and interesting per- 
sonality, made Homer Laughlin one of the 
most popular young men at the Horse Show. 
The ever genial and popular manager of 




Photo by Graham. 

RINGMASTER GRAHAM. 



the Hotel Green, J. H. Holmes, was an inter- 
ested onlooker Wednesday night. 

The boy that was thrown by Tadpole 
merely remarked, "well, that was nearly a 
horse on me." 

Here is a sample of reporting by a "smart 
Aleck" employed by the Graphic to give our 
paper something more or less facetious: 

" Mrs. was attired in a sealskin cloak, 

with hot stove covers over her ears; Mrs. 



looked comfortable in a three-ply buffalo robe 

with hot water bag attachment; Miss 

was perfectly lovely in a combination suit of 
salamander with a $25 gas radiator en train " 
— and — well, here we stopped, and fired the 
wretch on account of his cold storage imper- 
turbability and Klondike methods of report- 
ing. 

Ringmaster Graham let loose just one for- 
lorn smile on Wednesday afternoon, and that 
was when Peter cantered around the sixty- 
seventh time, and everyone mistook the smile 
for a ray Of sunshine. The doctor never gave 
a kick, hut what he thought when he went out 
of the ring went reverberating clear out 
Huena Vista street. 



RAILROAD SOCIABILITY. 

AKTKR BILL NYE. 

SPEAKING of sociability of railroad 
tourists," said the man with a Holman 
liver pad around his neck and the celebration 
of a wake at the Santa Monica canyon over 
his left eye, "I never got so well acquainted 
as I did on the railroad down in Arizona the 
other day." 

"Why, how was that," inquired the three- 
card-monte evangelist from Pokerdavisville, 
who was not out on the road for his health. 

"Well, you see we were just bounding 
along at a forty-mile-an-hour speed, with the 
other train coming the opposite way on the 
same rail — double track on the folder — and we 
were telescoped." 

"Well? I don't see where the sociability 
racket comes in?" 

"Let me observe, ere you become impatient. 
The moment the trains telescoped 1 just went 
and sat in the lap of the fat girl from Santa 
Ana, and a girl from Pasadena planted herself 
on the silk hat of Ex-Mayor Toberman and in 
real old Altadena merriness she smashed that 
tile over the old gentleman's eyes." 

"I begin to catch on. You all- laid aside 
your Salvation Army reserve and made your- 
selves entirely at home? yes, I see. Well? 

<- I nearly laughed myself to death, when a 
young, innocent methodist preacher, who had 
been reading Daudet's Sappho, left his own 
quarter-section and commenced [a cake-walk 
on the lunch table of a bridal couple who were 
tackling for the first time some hard-boiled 
eggs moulded in a Pullman buffet. The most 
impetuous creature of all was a maid from 
Whittier of many summers who landed fairly 
in the water cooler head first, but was prompt- 
ly removed when L<ucky Baldwin was seen 
going towards her. I tell you what it is, if 
you want to get awfully well acquainted just 
get on board of a fast train on a Friday, on 
the 13th, after seeing the new moon over the 
left shoulder, and make sure that it is sched- 
uled to meet the other train on the same track, 
and you can get to know more people famil- 
iarly in one minute than you would in a year 
at the golfing grounds of the Country Club." 

A NOTED CALIFORNIAN GONE. 

THE death at 73 of William M. Toler, who 
served as a midshipman under Com- 
modore Sloat and raised the first American 



flag over Monterey at the occupation of Cal- 
ifornia in 1846, occurred at Oakland on Tues- 
day last. 

Fifty years after the first flag-raising 
Toler raised the Stars and Stripes over the old 
Custom-house at Monterey. He was one of 
the conspicuous characters in that celebration 
two years and a half ago. 

Toler was born in Venezuela in 1825, his 
father being in the United States Diplomatic 
Service. In 1841, four years before the United 
States Naval Academy was established, young 
Toler was appointed a midshipman in the 
United States Navy. He was sent to the 
Pacific Coast because of his knowledge of 
Spanish. His first visit to Monterey was in 
1842, when Commodore Jones hauled down 
the Mexican flag. 

Four years later the Mexican flag was 
hauled down to stay, and was replaced by the 
Stars and Stripes. Young Toler wrote the 
proclamation which Commodore Sloat read at 
the time. 

LAST WORDS OF GREAT MEN. 

GRANT, Jr. — An honest man is not only 
the noblest work of God, but also the 
scarcest. 

Burns — Perhaps all men are liars, but there 
are times when it is unwise to say so. 

Bi LLA — If all the signs may be relied on 
there will be something else "embalmed"' in a 
few days besides army meat. 

Barnes — The G. O. P., like republics, is 
ungrateful. 

Scott — The man who waits never accom- 
plishes anything. 

Felton — Lightning often strikes when it 
is least expected. 

Estee — Dreams and political predictions 
generally go by contraries. 

Bard — A good dark horse may be trotted 
out successfully at last. 



A growing city and a growing business has forced 
Kellam the Tailor to remove from his old stand 
South Broadway. He has located at 108 West 2nd 
street where he will continue to clothe the public 
with his famous $15 suits as of yore. 

An Art Premium 

The beautiful frontispiece on this week's issue 
printed on a heavy translucent card suitable for fram- 
ing, will be given with each three month's subscrip- 
tion sent to the office of Western Graphic. 

LEGAL BUSINESS 

We attend to your legal cases and make no charge 
if not successful. Our specialty is settling cases out 
of court. Hard collections collected. Advice free. 
Correspondence solicited. Langworthy Co., 226 So. 
Spring street, Los Angeles. 



LADIES & # 

Have your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

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222 ^Price 50 cts. 

North Main Street 



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PI Have you Called at 

OH Paper.. "The Angelo Studio? 



THE BEST ARTISTS 
PERFECT PRINTS 

Our work speaks for itself. 
Only High Grade work given to our Patrons 

BYRNE, BUILDING 

Third and Broadway 



Western Graphic 



Hbe Crown of the Valley 

Pasadena, Feb 3, 1899. 

DEAREST BETTY: — This is certainly 
the most stupid season for the society 
girls of Pasadena. Everyone seems to be suf- 
fering from chronic inertia. If it were not 
for golf at the Country Club some of us girls 
who havn't yet outlived our activity would be 
driven to Highlands. There hasn't been a 
social function at the Valley Hunt Club since 
January first and no one knows when there 
will be for the club is in status quo awaiting a 
general overhauling as to its constitution. 

Some important changes are soon to be ef- 
fected in its management which I will write 
you about as soon as they can be made public, 
and then I hope there will be a little new life 




Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Leffingwell, nee Miss 
Virginia Rowland, have returned from their 
wedding journey and are at the home of Mrs. 
Leffingwell's parents, Dr. and Mrs. F. F. Row- 
land, where they will spend ten days before 
going to their home at Fullerton. 

Mr. and Mrs. A S Halsted's new residence 
on South Euclid avenue is nearing completion 
and they expect to take possession about the 
18th of this month. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Coburn of Boston 
are guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. I). Wilde of 
Orange Grove avenue. Mrs. Coburn was Miss 
Edith Wilde and although she has been mar- 
ried several years this is her first visit with 
her parents here since her marriage, and the 
young married people are arranging a number 
of entertainments in her honor. Miss Dob- 
bins gave a box party at ' School for Scandal" 
last week and Mrs. Thaddeus Lowe Jr. gave a 
luncheon Saturday, both in 
honor of Mrs. Coburn. 

Mrs. F. B. Childs of Grand 
avenue has issued invitations 
for a card party for Tuesday 
evening of next week. 

I suppose the people in 
Pasadena generally know that 
there is a horse show in Los 
Angeles this week, but Jessica 
says she hasn't made up her 
mind yet whether they skill- 
fully taboo the subject be- 
cause they think it a country 
fair or because they fear it is 
something nickel. 

Of course some of the swag- 
ger set have been in for an 
afternoon or an evening, and 
a very few have occupied 
boxes, but to say any real 
interest has been displayed in 
the matter would be stretching 
a point. Phyllis. 




CHAS. E. SCHILLING as The Baron, in " Two Married Mei 
At Los Angeles Theater. 



infused into the dry bones of this organiza- 
tion. 

The older married ladies are having all the 
fun this year — card parties, breakfasts and 
luncheons but at a certain card party last 
week where tables were arranged for f:>rty 
guests only sixteen were present which would 
look as though inertia was epidemic. Jessica 
s\ys it is just possible the good dames of Pasa- 
dena are gradually awakening to the fact that 
there is something more elevating, inspiring 
and invigorating to be done in this glorious 
land of perpetual sunshine than caging them- 
selves in stuffy rooms and throwing themselves 
into a fever in a maddening effort to win an 
embroidered gew-gaw or add a bit of cut glass 
to an overstocked china closet. I am afraid 
Jessica will get herself disliked if she isn't 
careful. 

Mrs. Presley C. Baker, who has recently 
returned from an extended visit in the east, 
has issued invitations for a large at home 
February 14th. 



The publishers of Graphic 
take more than usual pride in 
presenting an illustraed page 
of Miss Belle Archer in this 
issue. Miss Archer comes of a 
family with a long pedigree, 
and one she can well be proud 
of, and the publishers are 
proud to be in the same 
strain, thus our pardonable 
pride in the rising and beauti- 
ful young actress. The Burbank will be filled 
from pit to d ome. 

The statement of the condition of the 
Main Street Savings Bank for the past year 
ending December 31, 1898, is a most gratify- 
ing one, as will be seen by the figures which 
are herewith presented: 

ASSETS. 

Cash on hand and due from other banks - $ 46,553. 16 

Loans on rral estate 348,779.09 

United States and other bonds - - 53,503.78 

Real estate 50,339.91 

Furniture and fixtures ■ 1,000 00 



LIABILITIES. 

Capital, paid up in gold 
Reserve Fund - 
Undivided Profits - 
Due depositors - 



$506,236.64 

$100,000 00 

- 10,000 00 

- 6,014 90 
• 389,321 55 



In the 6ay Life 

MISS Eliza Bonsall of South Grard ave- 
nue entertained at cards on Tuesday 
evening in honor of Miss Fannie Osborne 
who leaves this week for a tour of Mexico. 
Carnations and hearts were used in decorat- 
ing and progressive hearts was the amuse- 
ment of the evening. 

Mesdames Hughes, Butler and Shoemaker 
of St. James Park gave a delightful lunch 
party on Tuesday complimentary to Mrs. J. 
H. Montgomery and Miss Agnes Montgomery 
of Brantford, Canada. To meet the visiting 
ladies were Mesdames Harry Gray, William 
Wincup, Frank Wincup, H. M. Sale, J. L. 
Cowles, George Montgomery and Miss Eliza- 
beth Brownlee. White carnations and maid- 
enhair filled the three cut-glass vases, the 
central one being placed on a handsome sil- 
ver-rimmed mirror. Clusters of California 
violets were at each cover and lent a pretty 
bit of color to the table. 

Mrs. E. F. Spence and Miss Kate Spence 
of South Olive street were the hostesses at a 
charming luncheon on Wednesday, entertain- 
ing some of our buds and Chicago guests. 
About the table were Mesdames Walter Barn- 
well, Charles Dick, E. W. Fleming, George 
Sinsabaugh, Perne Johnson, Archibald Mc- 
Cutchen, Clarence Hall and the Misses Eliza- 
beth Shankland, Lila Fairchild, Helen Fair- 
child, and the Misses Grace Cregsten and 
Adelaide Cregsten of Chicago. Daffodills and 
maidenhair ferns, in a tall cut-glass vase, 
pleased the eye as a floral centerpiece, and, 
with the violets, formed a lovely setting. 

The Italians tell us that chi ha quattrino 
ha anires, which applies as well to horse 
shows as les courses de chevaux. The mere 
sending of one's check to the association does 
not settle the box-holders obligations, for 
there are the florist, the modiste, the hair- 
dresser, to say nothing of dinners, luncheons, 
suppers, bonbons and carriages for one's 
guests. Nearly all our entertaining has been 
in these forms this week, and my society 
column has been turned over to the sporting 
editor. 



$500,236.55 

Its officers are T. L. Duque, president; I. 
N. Van Nuys, vice president; B. V. Duque, 
cashier, and the other directors are H. W. 
Hellman, O. T. Johnson, H. W. O'Melveny, 
J. B. Lankershim, Kaspare Cohn, W. G. 
Kerckhoff and Abe Haas. 



The Los Angeles Orphans' Home 

This institution has not been before the 
public for several years and has now arranged 
to give a concert under the management of 
Mrs Modini-Wood and Prof. D. C. Morrison. 

No further guaranty of a high class enter- 
tainment need be given than these names, and 
when tickets are offered next week week, the 
Orphans' Home will expect its friends to re- 
spond liberally. An empty treasury and a 
house full of little children make their own 
silent appeal. 

Purveyors to the Horse Show 

It was a large undertaking well carried out to fur- 
nish all the hay and grain for the stock at the Horse 
Show. The P. J. Brannen Feed, Fuel and Storage 
Co., HOC), 810 S. Main St., woro the successful contrac 
tors. Telephone Main 119. 

Cream, Cheese, Butter, Eggs, Poultry. 
It is one of tno most convenient things in house- 
keeping to have these staples delivered fresh to your 
kitchon when you want them. T. Page Reeve, 548 
South Spring St. 

An Art Premium 

The beautiful frontispiece on this we9k's issue 
printed on a heavy translucent card suitable for fram- 
ing will be given with each three month's subscrip- 
tion sent to the office of Westekn GBAPmo. 



Western Graphic 




FALLACY. HELPMATE, CAPTAIN AN'D DEFENDER, FOUR BEACHES OWNED BY L. V. HARKNESS. 

FIRST ANNUAL HORSE SHOW 

Great Exhibition of Thoroughbreds from Various Parts of the State 

The Most Stunning Event that has Ever Taken Place 
In Southern California 



E[*QUINE aristocracy has been on dress 
-/ parade this week at Fiesta Park, and 
nothing has been more impressively enliven- 
ing in Los Angeles. The general public has 
responded to the efforts put forward by a 
number of courageous people to glorify the 
metropolis of Southern California and place it 
alongside of New York, Chicago, Boston and 
San Francisco, the only cities in the Union 
that have dared so pretentious, spectacular 
and costly a project as a Horse Show! and 
the horse, the noblest of all animals, has 
seemed to feel the sacredness and importance 
of the trust confided to it and has made addi- 
tional fame for itself and compliment for its 
owner. The heart leaps, the veins swell, the 
blood tingles, the nerves vibrate, as one 
watches the movements of the very finest 
specimens of brute excellence, the elect of 
their race, seemingly almost instinct with 
soul, fctraining every energy, thronging with 
tremendous throes of absolute abandonment 
for cup and plate. In these days of turf mar- 
vels and road records, when fast trotters pick 
up the miles and throw them behind their 
heels as fast as they can be counted, every- 
thing relating to the noble beast is of interest. 
To attend a Horse Show is to see in excellent 



miniature the sights of Rotten Row, the River" 
side Drive, Bellevue Avenue, the Prater, the 
Thiergarten, or Bois de Boulogne. To see in 
one week between one and two hundred horses 
of honorable pedigree condones the wheel 
craze which occupies ihe dusty roads and 
chases the faithful and beautiful servitor of 
nations into the highways and arenas for ad- 
miration and appreciation. That they are 
here of necessity and preference is a delight- 
ful denial of the decadence of the horse, for 
all the sprocket-titled cranks and electric con- 
trivances on earth cannot completely ca6t 
into desuetude the only poetic, picturesque 
and absolutely necessary means of convey- 
ance — the horse — the noble horse — the for- 
ever noble horse! 

After all that has been said and written 
of the preparation for this, the greatest of all 
stunning events that has ever been attempted 
in Southern California, it is not too much to 
say that upon the opening day more than had 
been promised was to be seen, even to detail 
of decoration, lighting, seating, music, dignity, 
decorum, and all other appliances. The open- 
ing day and evening was raw, and wraps 
were pretty generally used, which obscured 
or partly obscured many magnificent cos- 




tumes and ornaments, as the request of the 
management that everyone appear in their 
best and most acceptable toilets had been 
agreeably complied with, although unseen 
caloric attachments would not have been 
strictly disagreeable. Surely Fiesta Park had 
been the object of unexpected transformation — 
a change from an ugly collection of rain- 
shrunk benches to an arena of fair propor- 
tions and appointments. The intelligent 
finger of art had made the place a bower to 
which the daughter of Aurenzgebe might have 
been invited and which eclipsed even Cash- 
mere in point of floral munificence, so artisti- 
cally and extravagantly had Captain F. Ed- 
ward Gray of the Ingleside Floral Company 
connived. 

The entrance for the public was at the 
Twelth street end and for the horses at the cor- 
ner of Grand and Pico. The tribunes and secre- 
tary's office are on the right as one enters, 
draped in the national colors, Advancing 
to the gate leading to the arena an excellent 
view of the entire interior is had, the chief 
feature being the arena 80x200 feet, thickly 
carpeted with tan bark, 24 tons in all, from 
Santa Cruz. Around it is a stout five rail 
fence; then a six-foot promenade, laid with 
plank and completely surrounding the arena. 
Rising above the promenade and entirely en- 
circling it are the boxes, seventy-five in num- 




ELECTOR AND HARMONY, ENTERED BY THE PANORAMA S TABLES, W. M. BUDINGER PROPRIETOR. 
El ector bay gelding by Electioneer, dam by Bashaw. Harmony, bay geldiug by Don Cossock by Harold, sire of Maud S (2 0834), 
dam by Alcoyne. Mr. Budinger states that this fine team are for sale. 



JEANNETTE H, 1 years old, by McKenniy, dam Etta Willi 

ber, with six chairs each; these are covered 
in front with white muslin festooned in red. 
The sides and back are done in various colors. 
Behind the boxes are the rows of seats covered 
with white muslin, these rise tier above tier to 
the tent walls, making the total seating capac- 
ity nearly 2500 Over all is the canvas, which 
is as thoroughly water-tight as all tents of 
such huge dimensions. The band stand and 
restaurant and bar are all on the right side of 
the main entrance. 

The judges' table is fituated in the center 
of th^ arena and the judges are J. C. Kirkpat- 
rick, manager of the Palace Hotel, San Fran- 
cisco; E. D. Beylard of San Francisco; L. J. 
Rose, Captain T. B. Merry and others of Los 
Angeles, and the ringmaster is the accom- 
plished Richard [Graham of New York. The 
president. Mr. Severance, sits in a box fin- 
ished in orange, half way down the left, and 
Secretary Wooster has the box directly oppo- 
site. The animals being shown are represen- 
tative Southern California carriage and hack- 
ney and draft horses, tandem teams, four-in- 
hands, polo and Shetland ponies, saddle 




Western Graphic 



_e Billy Sayre 5868, he by Young Jim 20C9, he by George Wilks 519. The dam 
was Tansey by George Wilks; Tansey's dam was Dame Tansey by Daniel Lam- 
Etta Wilks was Irish Mag by George Wilks, he by Hambletonian 10, he by 
Dam of George Wilks was Dolly Spanker by Henrv Clay 8, she by Old Tele- 
lander; second dam, May Lock bv American Star 37; third dam, Lady Irwin by 
10; fourth dam, Daughter of Abdallah Chief. Etta Wilks is the dam of four 
ire all shown and are showing a great deal of speed Etta Wilks now heavy in 
nter. Race record, 2.19J4 Property of Mrs. L. J. H. Hastings. Horses can be 
race track in charge of the well-known horseman, Mr. Vance. 



horses, noted pacing and trotting teams and 
singles, thoroughbred stallions and their get 
and fine brood mares and their offspring, and 
a goodly number of the finest of their kind 
from Burlingame and San Francisco. 

On the further side of the main tent are 
the stalls where the thoroughbreds and other 
equine beauties are stylishly quartered. Here 
are Silkwood, Mrs. Mark Sibley Severance's 
nine beauties, all in stalls handsomely orna- 
mented with an elaborate freize in wheat 
straws plaited with ribbons below the heads. 
These stalls are arranged in blocks, with main 
streets and alleys. The outside stalls are 
lined w ith muslin. 

Among those from San Francisco and else- 
where in the north who have horses here are 
W. S. Hobart, John Parrott, A. Howard, 
Frank Carolan, A. P. Mathews, Peter Dono 
hue Martin and others; Mr. Hobart's entries 
being Monarch, Performer, Damrosch and 
Seidl, all dark bays, with black points and free 
from white. Hobart's favorite four-in-hand 
park team. Dip, Sparkle, Spot and Lightfoot ; 
piebald pony four-in-hand team. Cannon, 
Mortar, Stars and Stripes, a black four-in- 
hand, smaller than the first four mentioned, 
blood-like in appearance and highly finished. 
King and Emperor, private carriage team, 
and Czar and Sultan, another carriage team 
but can be driven as a four in-hand with 




King and Emperor as the wheelers and Czar 
and Sultan leaders. Pride and Prejudice, 
Mrs. Hobart's park phaeton team. Paragon 
and Peacock, Hr. Hobart's tandem team, that 
have taken many prizes. Tommy Tompkins, 
a bay with bald face and white legs, saddle 
horse. Lancer a single footer, and sometimes 
driven as a wheeler in tandem team. Union 
Square and Madison Square, showy pair of 
seal-browns. Five polo ponies, two of which 
are called Pickwick and Scrambled Eggs, the 
latter having been ridden by Peter Martin on 
Wednesday night to the great delight of the 
clubmen and the rounders. Decerqber Night 
and June Day, a matched pair of browns, 
sometimes used as leaders to other teams. 
Royalty, gray mare and fine high jumper. 

John Parrott brought down Green's Rufus, 
champion hackney stallion, a bright chest- 
nut; Alabama and Sovereign, Paouita and 
Petita, four in hand, very stylish; Amber and 
Sonata, both by Green's Rufus; Prig, by 
Rufus, very stylish in harness; Theory, a bay 
gilding, trained as a high jumper, and is a 
very powerful and elegant horse. 

A Howard of San Francisco, Eva and 
Doherty,strawberry roans,used as a park team. 



9 



J. W. A. Off of the State Loan and Trust 
Company shows a pair of ponies, Black 
Beauty and Certain Stamp, two pretty little 
bits of horseflesh. 

Society people were out en masse the 
opening day and evening, most of (he ladies 
in the boxes wearing elegant costumes and 
their escorts in full evening suits and silk 
hats. Mrs. Mark Sib'ey Severance, an owner 
of fine horses, and an indefatigable worker 
for the success of the undertaking, had a 
center box on the Grand avenue side, which 
had been decorated in yellow and red. Mr. 
and Mrs Severance's family and Miss Sey- 
mour occupied their box in the afternoon and 
evening. Mrs. Severance wore a costume of 
beige cloth and large hat of violet velvet in 
the afternoon, and in the evening gray silk 
and black velvet. 

Mrs. H. W. Hellman was in black silk 
waist appliqued in white Russian lace and 
black silk skirt. Miss Freda Hellman had 
on a pink silk covered with spangled net and 
wore a white picture hat. On other occasions 
Miss Hellman wore a white and green silk 
and black lace, a gray tailor suit and light 
blue silk. In the Hellman box, which was 



''ifiifiiiiTC 




DIXIE QUEEN and ADA R (2.16]. a fast bay team owned by Nowlan & Chase. Dixie Queen foaled in 1892; sire, Shmleland Hero 
(registered in Wallace's book), heny Satellite 2500, he by Robert Bonner, he by Hambletonian 10; his dam, Lizzie by Hambletonian LO 
second dam, Gold Button by Exton Fclipse; third dam, Sir Thomas stock. Dixie Queen's dam, Daisy Wade; Daisy Wade bj Sllvei 
Heel, by Gibraltar, by Echo.by Hambletonian 10; her dam, Lady Wade by Ben Wade (thoroughbred.; second dam, The I ehi'gh ; Mare 
(an American trotting bred mare brought out from the East). Aha R t\767, foaled 1S92, by Adirondack 719; dam, Belle by Kockwood 1467; 
g.d., Fly by Napa, son of Norfolk. 



VELVET ROSE, 3 years old, by McKenny, dam Etta Wilks. 



Dr. Lyman of Pasadens shows a brown 
gelding called Trip Denmark, a Kentucky- 
bred saddle horse. 

Frank Carolan of San Francisco, as hand- 
some as ever, drove a splendid hackney horse. 

R. B. Fithian of Santa Barbara, Straggler 
and Matchbox, geldings, used for the saddle; 
and Romeo, bay gelding, used as a road horse. 

Mr. L. V. Harkness of New York, who is 
out here for the winter and who brought some 
of his fine horses with him for mere pleasure, 
not dreaming that Los Angeles would ever 
aspire to a horse show, exhibited Lady Gray 
and Mars, dark brown, with big and tremen- 
dously well shaped bodies set on strong legs; 
Major and Colonel, dark bays, very symmet- 
rical and seemingly very serviceable horses; 
Captain, Helpmate, Defender and Fallacy, all 
blooded bays with little or no white, seemed 
to be a four-in-hand team of good size and 
great substance. The other four may be 
driven together as a relief team. Harnessed 
to Mr. Harkness' superb drag they are cer- 
tainly hard to beat for style, and were received 
with great approbation. 



decorated in white and pink drapery and car- 
nations, were H. J. Fleischman, and Eugene 
Meyer of New York. 

The box of the family of Messrs. Hambur- 
ger and Marx was artistically decorated in 
pink and green, the box party being Mr. 
and Mrs. R. E. Marx, Mr. and Mrs. Otto 
Sweet, Miss Belle and Evelyn Hamburger. 
Miss Eveline Hamburger wore black and 
white mousseline de soie, the bodice and 
sleeves of pink satin covered with white em- 
broidered and beaded mousseline, the skirt 
finished with numerous flounces of black chif- 
fon, en train; a pink picture hat with white 
plumes and tulle completed the toilet. Mrs. 
R. E. Marx had on heliotrope satin, the skirt 
trimmed with black lace, the bodice trimmed 
with white beaded chiffon. Mrs. Otto Sweet, 
tan silk trimmed with white satin and point 
lace. Miss Belle Hamburger blue and white 
taffetta lavishly trimmed with spangled chif- 
fon and embroidered white satin. 

The box of Mr. and Mrs. Cameron Ers- 
kine Thorn, sumptuously decorated with smi- 
lax and poinseitas, contained on the opening 



10 



Western Graphic 



night, Mrs. Emeline Childs and Miss Childs, 
Mrs. C. E. Thorn and Miss Jet te Thorn and Dr. 
Haynes and Mr. Childs. Mrs. Emeline Childs 
had on an elegant black peau de soie with an 
overdress of black Maltalace. Miss Hortense 
Childs was charming in a silver gray poplin 
with trimming of steel and white chiffon and 
a gray tulle toque, and black velvet wrap 

with ermine and 
lace. Mrs. Thorn 
wore a costume of 
black velvet trim- 
med with sable, 
coat of Louis Six- 
teenth style, front 
of white chiffon, 
and looked unus- 
ually blooming. 
Miss Jette Thom 
was lovely in a 
French costume of 
gray, elaborately 
braided with white, 
sheath skirt trim- 
med with velvet of 
same shade, and 
wore a black pict- 
ure hat. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Newmark were present 
Wednesday night, the ladies attired elabor- 
ately for the occasion. Mrs. Newmark was 
becomingly gowned in black velvet embroid- 
ered with jet and trimmed with rare old point 
lace. Miss Rose Newmark was simply lovely 
in pale blue crepe de chine, appliqued with 
lace and gold spangles, white wrap and white 
feathers in coiffure. The white decorations of 
the box framed the occupants as in a picture. 

The box of Mrs. Arcadia B. De Baker was 
in white carnations. Mrs. Baker wore black 
taffeta and embroidered chiffon and sable 



Erkenbrecher, an extremely handsome woman, 
wore black silk covered with spangled net. 

One of the most elaborately decorated 
boxes was that of Mr. and Mrs. .1. F. Francis. 






Photo by Graham 

JOHN W. A. I iFK 
"Black Beauty" 



The color scheme of pink, white and green 
was carried out in ferns, carnations and tarl- 
ton and the appearance was altogether most 
beautiful. Mr. and Mrs. Francis have enter- 
tained handsomely throughout the week and 
among their guests have been Major and 
Mrs. Ben Truman, Mr. and Mrs. John T. 
Jones, Dr. and Mrs. E. W. Fleming, Miss 
Georgie Truman and Miss Dominguez. Mrs. 
Francis wore an elaborate costume of fawn 
cloth with sable and purple velvet garniture; 
hat of heliotrope. In the evening, imported 
gown of pale shades, velvet wrap and Virot 
bonnet. Mrs. Fleming handsome hat of 
white and black evening wrap; Mrs. Jones 
lilac silk and opera bonnet; Mrs. Truman 
cloth suit, with brocade, fur and lace scarf; 
Miss Truman, Burgundy silk, lace and black 
hat; Miss Dominguez gray cloth costume with 
Paris toque. 

The box occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Posey 
was decorated in callas and smilax and was 




L. WARIWS TANDEM, Santa Clara iu lead, Kittiewake at the wheel. Mr. Waring has also a riding horse, 
Telephone, and a roadster, Receiver, entered. 



cape. Mrs. Winston costume of black, Mrs. 
Gray dress cape and violet toque, Miss Julia 
Winston purple and white, Miss Carrie Wins- 
ton geranium hat and broadcloth gown. 

The Hobart box was prettily enlivened 
with flowers and was occupied by Mrs. Ham- 
ilton in pink and white, Mrs. Roy Jones in 
black and white, and Miss Schuyler Cole in 
handsome suit of white and white wrap and 
black tips in her hair, looking very vivacious 
and pretty. 

The Byron Erkenbrechers' box was a sym- 
phony of soft colors, and the other occupants 
were Mrs. M. Erkenbrecher in black velvet 
trimmed with point lace, Miss Strohm in 
tailor suit, and C. A. Miller. Mrs. Byron 



pretty and effective. Mrs. 0. P. Posey was 
gowned in an old rose velvet waist trimmed 
with otter, black and old rose brocade satin 
skirt, picture hat of old rose and black 
plumes. With Mrs. Posey were Mrs. J. Den- 
ison, Mrs. M. M. Richmond and Mr. L. G. 
Foster, guests from the East, also Mrs. Van 
Gieson, Miss Denison and O. Posey and J. 
Posey. 

Roses, smilax and tarletan set off the box 
that contained the Chief Magistrate and his 
fine family and other guests. Mrs. Eaton 
was in dark brown silk and Miss Eaton in a 
red tailor made suit. Miss Louise Schwartz 
wore a costume of blue, and black picture 
hat, and Miss Marie Schwartz was in white 
with black hat. 



Always popular Wm. Garland and his 
charming bride and her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Hinman, and other friends have been 
enthusiastic onlookers from their handsomely 
decorated box. Mrs. Garland was in blue 
silk brocaded in pink and white; Mr. and 
Mrs. Norris were their guests in the evening, 
Mrs. Norris gowned in a dark satin trimmed 
with fur. Miss Rust of Cleveland was also a 
guest, in blue velvet waist and black satin 
skirt. 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Hook's box was 
in white and green. Mrs. Hook wore a dress 
of brown, handsomely trimmed with point 
lace. Their guests were Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Griffith of Johannesburg, 111. 

The box occupied by Mr. and Mrs. C. C. 
Carpenter, Mr. and Mrs. Cosmo Morgan and 
Mrs. Frank Burnett was neatly decorated. 
Mrs. Carpenter had on a white wrap over 
black satin, Mrs. Buinett also wore an ermine 
wrap over black satin, and Mrs. Morgan was 
in black silk and chiffon. 

Mr. Robert Rowan was a guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Garland and had a hard time of it keep- 
ing his artistic eye out for pretty girls in 
neighboring boxes. 

General M. H. Sherman and Mr. and Mrs. 
E. P. Clark have entertained many guests 
each day. Wednesday afternoon Mrs. Clark 
chaperoned the Misse3 Emma Graves, Violet 
Wigmore, Muse of Pasadena, Lucy and Mary 
Clark. The young ladies wore stylish visit- 
ing toilettes. Mrs. Clark was gowned in black 
with touches of orange. In the evening Mr. 
and Mrs. Modini-Wood, Mr. and Mrs. Clark 
and General and Mrs. Churchill formed a 
party. Mrs. Modini-Wood wore a costume of 
rich brocaded satin and pink chiffon, fur 
wrap, black and white hat; Mrs. Clark wore 
a handsome black silk trimmed with lace and 
velvet, picture hat and shoulder ' cape of jet 
and chiffon; Mrs. Churchill was in a rich 
black silk with trimmings of white chiffon. 

The Van Nuys box was in white and green 
and occupied on Wednesday night by Mrs, 
Van Nuys and family and Judge and Mrs. 
Hubbell. Mrs. Van Nuys wore an evening 
wrap of lace and velvet and a bonnet of pink 
roses and jet. Mrs. Hubbell was in black and 
white, with modish hat of black velvet with 
white plumes. The Misses Annis and Kate 
Van Nuys were in pretty frocks of white. 

The Wilcox box was occupied by the ladies 
of the family, Mrs. M. A. Wilcox in black 
satin, wrap of black and appliqued lace; Mrs. 
M. A. Longstreet, black satin, evening wrap, 
toque of brown and blue; Mrs. J. C. Drake, 
black chiffon, bonnet of cut steel and tur- 
quoise velvet; Mrs. R. H. Miner, green and 
white, with handsome wrap; Miss Arguello 
blue gown with elaborate light cape. 

Mr. H. Gaylord Wilshire was accompanied 
by Miss Norah Wilshire and Messrs. Fred 
Stephenson and Hugh May. Miss Wilshire 
was strikingly attired in red, cloak, gown and 
hat of the same' shade. 

Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hoyle, Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Griffith and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Griffith 
occupied a box Wednesday night, gayly be- 
decked with blossoms and greenery. The 
ladies were all bonnetted; wearing picture 
hats and evening wraps. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Newhall had a box 
party of friends on opening night. Mrs. 
Newhall was attractively gowned in rich bro- 
cade and lace, and wore an opera wrap of 
cream broadcloth and passementerie; tips 
in coiffure. Mrs. Newhall was looking her 
best, which means much. 

The box of George Rice Sr. was trimmed 



Western Graphic 



11 



with callas and smilax and was occupied by 
Mr. and Mrs. George Rice Sr., George Rice Jr., 
Mr. and Mrs. Hays Rice and Mrs. Frank 
Drake. Mrs. Rice Sr. was in black silk 
trimmed with lace. Mrs. Hays R ce in a com- 
bination toilet of pink and green, and black 
picture hat, and Mrs. Drake in a Paris tailor 
made gown and black picture hat. 

Captain William Banning's box was occu- 
pied by Mr. and Mrs. Hancock Banning, Miss 
Susie Patton, Miss Mary Belle Elliott, M. L. 
Graff and N. W. Bell. Mrs. Banning was 
elaborately costumed in white with opera 
cloak of pink; Miss Patton was becomingly 
attired in pink and green and Miss Elliott 
was prettily frocked in white liberty silk and 
taffeta, light wrap. 




V\ G. DURFfiE'S MAMTE RILEY, winner of the blue rib 
petitors. the first day of the Horse Show. Mamie Riley, 2.16 
Del Sur, 2.24, full sister to San Pedro, 2.10 pacing, 2.14 trotting, 
firsts,!** seconds, 1 third (accident). 

General and Mrs. Forman and Miss For- 
man had as their guests Major and Mrs. E. 
F. C. Klokke and Miss Klokke. The decora- 
tions were in white and green. Mrs. Klokke 
wore a rich costume of rich brocade satin, 
opera bonnet and sable cape; Mrs. Forman, 
black satin with cut jet trimmings; Miss For- 
man, pink and black; Miss Klokke, green 
silk with cream gimp of shirred mouselline, 
black hat. 

Count and Countess Jaro von Schmidt 
had as their guests on Wednesday night Mr. 
and Mrs. Wilbur Parker and Mr. and Mrs. 0. 
W. Childs. The box was in smilax and 
violets. Mrs. Von Schmidt wore black and tur- 
quoise; Mrs. Parker, gray silk and handsome 
wrap; Mrs. Childs, black satin with gold 
appliques, pink and white toque. 

Major and Mrs. John Norton and Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter L. Vail occupied a white and red 
box together, Mrs. Norton appearing in blue 
and white and Mrs. Vail in black satin. 

With Major and Mrs. Lee were Mr. and. 
Mrs. John Wigmore and Mr. and Mrs. Hugh 
Vail. Box in pink. Mrs. Wigmore wore an 
imported wrap of black and appliqued lace, 
Mrs. Vail was gowned in pink and white and 
Mrs. Lee wore brown silk and lace. 

The Rule box was embowered in white 
and green, great sheaves of chrysanthemums 
caught with ribbons being tied all about the 
railing. In the afternoon Mrs. Rule invited the 
Misses Silent, Cross, McFarland and the 
Misses Milner, whose fresh young faces were 
quite as lovely as the blossoms surrounding 
them. Mrs. Rule wore a stylish tailor suit of 



gray Venetian cloth, turquoise and diamond 
cravat pin and toque of bird plumage to 
match costume. In the evening Mr. and Mrs. 
Rules' guests included Mr. and Mrs. E. I). 
Silent and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Thomas. Mrs. 
Thomas was gowned in white crepe and cerise 
trimmings; Mrs. Silent, pink silk and white 
lace. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank King had as guests 
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Holder of Pasadena. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Solano had in their 
box Dr. and Mrs. Barlow and Mr. and Mrs. 
L. A. Wolters, decorations in green. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Hubbard of Redlands 
had as box guests Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Hun- 
saker, the Misses Hunsaker and Dan Hun- 
saker. 

Among the 
many who at- 
tended the open- 
ing afternoon or 
evening,were the 
following well- 
known young so- 
ciety people of 
this city: Misses 
Fairchild, Moore 
Grace Clark, 
Whittaker, Ster- 
ry, Thorn, Van 
Nuys, Shank- 
land, Carhart, 
Smith, Landt, 
Graves, Burks, 
Wigmore, Wins- 
ton, Grace Cole, 
Jones, Severance 
Childs ; Messrs. 
Carhart, Black- 
stone, O'Hara, 
Gottschalk, Sin- 
sabaugh, Burks, 
Widney, Hub- 
bard, Dickenson, Dezendorf, Avery, Van Dyke, 
Brown, Shankland, Holmes. 

The young ladies of the Delta Iota Chi 
Society have great cause to felicitate them- 
selves over the impression made by their 
members one night. The box of Mrs. Sever- 
ance, occupied by Misses Pansy and Edith 
Whitaker and Miss Marguerite Moore, pre- 
sented a most beautiful appearance and well 
deserved the blue ribbon which it won. 

Col. G. G. G reen of Woodbury, N. J., pro- 
prietor of the Hotel Green at Pasadena, with 
his family have been interested observers. 
The charming personality of Miss Lotta 
Green, combined with the cordial hospitality 
of the Colonel and his wife, makes their box 
altogether a most popular quarter with those 
fortunate enough to enjoy their acquaintance: 
and it is sincerely regretted that the poor 
health of Col. Green has prevented his atten- 
dance more often. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris Newmark and Mr. 
and Mrs. Loeb had a box enlivened with carn- 
ations and smilax. The ladies were in satin 
gowns trimmed with lace and wore Paris bon- 
nets. 

The attractive Heinzeman sisters, escorted 
by Ed Heinzeman, J. O. Cashin and Ed 
Clark drew many eyes to their prettily deco- 
rated box. Miss Augusta was in pink chiffon 
waist and skirt of black and white silk and hat 
of heliotrope silk and sweeping black plumes; 
Miss Henrietta was gowned in a dove gray 
silk with picture hat; and Miss Ella had on 
a Nile green silk waist and skirt of crimson 
brocaded velvet and hat to match. 



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a box artistically enlivened with carnations 
and smilax. Mrs. Pubrow wore an imported 
dress and bonnet to match. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Cline's box was 
in pink and green. Mrs. Cline wore light 
gray with white chiffon and white and gold 
passementerie; Mrs. Thomas E. Gibbon was 
in blue with white lace and velvet; Mrs. Vic- 
toria Harrell, dark blue with white lace. 

Judge Sterry's box was occupied by Mrs- 
Sterry, Miss Sterry, Miss Jennie Perley, Nor- 
man Sterry and Edward Field. The ladies 
were all in attractive costumes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kaspare Cohn had as guests 
in their box Mr. and Mrs. John Kahn, Miss 
Tessie Brownstein and Charles Brownstein. 

Mr. and Mrs. L V. Harkness had as guests 
the Misses Hibney and Stimson and L. N. 
Harkness, Harry Harkness, A E. Stone and 
A. K. Macomber. 




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12 



Western Graphic 




A CHAT WITH BELLE ARCHER 




Til E other day a man wondered over to a 
picturesque New Jersey suburb where, 
surrounded by a formidable menagerie of dogs, 
cats, pigeons, chickens, ducks, turkeys and as- 
sorted other pets, he found Belle Archer, con- 
cerning whom a New York photographer has 
said that more portraits of her have been sold 
than any other American actress, and who 
has been regarded abroad as the type of our 
native beauty. 

" My horses are not here," she laughed 
apologetically as the guest surveyed the men- 
agerie. "They're out on a Minnesota ranch, 
but I hope to have them with me soon, and 
then the collection will be complete. That's 
the worst part of going on the road; one may 
not carry along chickens. |and ducks and things 
unless it is a farm play or a circus and such 
are not my line. You know I'm very glad to 
be off the road for a few months, just to rest, 
to recuperate and to try to forget the theatre. 
But that is what you came to talk about? Oh, 
of course! Once in the theatre and how ut- 
terly impossible it is to ever get away from it ! 
It isn't to be forgotten nor set aside, and even 
when one rambles off for a little rest, fancy- 
ing the cheerful old goddess of the drama 
may not discover the escape of one small 
slave some affable messenger ] like yourself is 
sent to bring one back to talk shop. 

" No, I have not come of a theatrical fam- 
ily. My father was superintendent of the 
telegraph company at Eaton, Pa., where I was 
born, and I was one of the seven sisters, four 
of whom are living, one being known to the 
stage as Eleanor Lane-Bell (Mrs. Charles J. 
Bell) ; another is the wife of a New York busi- 
ness man, and the third, the eldest, is a nun, 
so you see, church and stage are united happi- 
ly in our family. I never played in amateur 
theatricals, nor recited for the delectation of 
admiring persons, but I plunged directly into 
the realm of professional life, making my de- 
bute when a very small girl with Mr. and Mrs 
William J. Florence in "The Mighty Dollar.' - 




It was a momentous occasion. I had just four 
lines to speak, but I was 60 scared and so ner- 
vous that they might well have been twenty 
thousand. That first speech shall never be for- 
gotten: 'Oh, Mr. Dart, what a jolly idea! We 
are going to have music and dancing in the 
open air, and the band is coming out on the 
piazza to play for us !' 

"It doesn't seem ovei powering, I know, 
but I studied that awful part all the time, 
night and day, for a week. The nervousness 
reached the verge of prostration when the 
performance came, but I pulled myself to- 
gether and managed somehow to say the 
lines. And then, as soon as I could leave the 
scene, I dashed down stairs and hunted up 
the orchestraleader to ask how I had done it 
all. " Very sorry," said he gently, " but I 
didn't hear you." Everyone believed that my 
stage career had been nipped in the bud, but 
Joseph Jefferson had told me that I might 
play Minna in Rip Van Winkle, and he kept 
the promise. I had a very bad cold when I 
appeared as " Leetle Meenie," and worried 
Mr. Jefferson very much, I've no doubt, but 
he has been always kind to me, delighting to 



FOUR PICTURES OF MISS BELLE ARCHER, 

An American beantv, an accomplished actress a charming 
companion— in "A Contented Woman." at the Hnihank. 

call me "Miss Period," because of a small 
mouth which, he said, was like a period. 
Nor were these my only appearances in child 
roles. With John McCullough I played the 
boy, Lucius, in Julius Caesar, and then it was 
that I went before the curtain for the first 
time. After one of the tragedian's great 
scenes, in which Lucius figured, Mr. McCul- 
lough led me out when he responded to a 
call. Continued applause brought me out 
several times, after which, as the enthusiasm 
went on, I confidently observed to the great 
actor, " They want us again." And he mused, 
I suppose, at such enormous assurance in one 
so young, looked down upon me and smiled: 
" Yes my child, they do." So we bowed again. 
I actually believed at the time that the ap- 
plause was for little me. Needless to say, 
remembering my early efforts, I have ever the 
greatest of sympathy for beginners on the 
stage, and try whenever I may to make it 
easier to them, for I know that the path that 
they must travel is full of rough places. 





CLOUDY evenings and Hor6e Show even- 
ings played hob with the theaters this 
week, though none suffered to any great ex- 
tent. The Orpheum always has at least fair 
houses except in the event of a storm; the 
Burbank is on a rushing wave of popularity 
and the week's attraction was as good as a 
porous plaster; while Manager Wyatt could 
not overlook the fact that his clientele were 
all horsey people (for this week) and so 
closed the house the last half of the week. 



T AKE Rosenthal, not very long since man- 
| ager of the Orpheum, has lost the oppor- 
tunity of his life to become famous. As man- 
ager of the Creighton theater in Omaha it be- 
came his pleasure to witness the extraction of 
a tooth from one of Paul Batty's bears. The 
bear objected to the extent of bursting his 
bonds and in his blood-curdling ferocity mak- 
ing the spectators look like a flock of cocka- 
toos. There was a grand scatterment of 
humanity, but the bear got his eye on the 
man whose business was in the front end of 
the theater, and with a roar the bear inaugu- 
rated a game of tag with Jake Rosenthal in 
the ignominous role of "not it." Jake knew 
more about selecting soubrettes than he did of 




Western Graphic 



13 



stage paraphernalia and made the fatal mis- 
take of trying to climb a canvas banyan tree. 
Bruin saw him first and with one swat tore 
off one shoe, half of his coat, tumbled him 
into a pile of rubbish and then went side- 
wheeling off around the stage for other vic- 
tims. The bear was finally subdued by the 
trainers, but I expect daily to hear from Jake 
a story something like " Betsy and I killed 
a b'ar." 



singer and makes a hit with his new song, 
"How'd you Like to be the Iceman? " 

The Arbra troop of acrobats are a smooth 
lot of athletes, though apparently not having 
studied anatomy enough to know that they 
have bones in their bodies, so supple are they. 
From a musical standpoint their performance 
is torturing and could be pleasantly left out. 



1 ^^7^P^.^p^r,^--^\^-r =-S23S»8) 



Cor. FIRST and 
SPRING STS. 



THE Orpheum presents three attractive 
new numbers this week, the most inter- 
esting being Carter de Haven and Bonnie 
Maie, two children who do a turn like a pair 
of marionettes. Their every movement is 
plainly a faithfully studied copy, and I can- 




A PRETTY play is "Tennessee's Pard- 
ner," and the breeziness of the West 
runs all through the lines and action. The 
characters are as usual in stories of love and 
sorrow and tragedy in the days of excitement 
made so interesting in the stories of Bret 
Harte. 

That the Burbank management have de- 
termined to succeed is 
shown in the high charac- 
ter of this company, which 
for the first time is playing 
to popular prices. The same 
is true of the Billy Archer 
Company, which will ap- 
pear next week. A heavy 
guarantee is necessary to 
secure a contract with these 
combinations and the Bur- 
bank deserves a full recog- 
nition for its enterprise and 
fearlessness. 



KATE UART, with the Daniels Opera Co., in "The Idol's Eye 



not but be filled with pity for the little folks 
through their whole act, thinking of my child- 
hood days, which most beautiful memory of a 
life is to be denied these babies by making a 
man and woman of them in their infancy. 
But the ways of the world are becoming queer- 
er every day, and I can only ride a little ways 
at a time or I'll lose my breath. 

Johnnie Carroll and Addie Crawford give 
a "farce," though it reminds one of an old 
tune the country fiddlers play in Missouri 
called "High Wind through a Post Hole." 
Miss Crawford has very little to do besides 
looking sweet at us deadheads, but she does 
that very well and get her name on the pro- 
gram in big type. Mr. Carroll is a very clever 



Symphony Orchesira — On 
Tuesday afternoon, February 
14, the Los Angeles Symphony 
Orchestra will give its sixth 
popular matinee concert, pre- 
senting a well-arranged pro- 
gram as follows: The opening 
number is the March de Cor- 
tege from Gounod's Queen of 
Sheba. The second number is 
the Excerpts from II Pagliacci, 
by Ruggero Leon Covallo. The 
soloist for this occasion is that 
charming vocalist, Miss Anna 
Virginia Metcalf, who will pre- 
sent Jules Massenett's Pleurez 
Aria from the La Cid. It is dis- 
tinguished by its mellowness 
and sweetness and is a smoothly 
flowing theme. Miss Metcalf 
presented this number with 
the Thomas Orchestra at the 
musical festival which opened 
the Omaha Exposition, and re- 
ceived commendable press no- 
tices from all the Omaha papers 
and was highly complimented 
by Prof. Sherwood and the 
other artists who participated 
on that occasion. The sym- 
phony to bo presented is Rce- 
thoven's seventh Symphony, a 
favorite with this composer. It 
is full of romantic interest and 
is considered the best of the 
Immortal Nine. The closing 
number of the program is 
Weber's Jubel Overture, which 
was composed for the festival hold in Dresden 
in September, 1818, in commemoration of the fiftieth 
anniversary of the accession to tho throne of Fred- 
erick Augustus the First of Saxony. This overture 
was played on September 11, 1818, and has since been 
a favorito concert number. 

This is one of the best programs that Prof. Ham- 
ilton has presented for the consideration of our 
musical public and it has tho advantage of contain- 
ing a greater variety of themes than any given before. 



Los Angeles Theater— The forthcoming engage 
ment of Frank Daniels at the Los Angeles theater 
next week gives promise of living long in the memory 
of those who love an evening of clean fun and happy 
melody. This assumption is based on the practically 
unanimous verdict of tho press of those cities in 
which Daniels has played engagements this season to 



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14 



Western Graphic 



the effect that he has made a decidedly popular hit 
with his two operas, "The Idol's Eye" and "The 
Wizard of the Nile." The two operas are from the 
pens of Harry D. Smith and Victor Herbert. Both 
writers have s clean score of victories to their credit, 
of which the two operas in question are said to be 
the greatest. Harry li. Smith has a nimble fancy, 
and he is said to have employed it in the two books 




A FEAT BY 



MISS JULIA ARBRA- 
At the Orpheum. 



■Abhra TKOlll'E, 



which he has written for Daniels to the best advan- 
tage. He has laid the scenes of both operas in the 
far East, one of them along the banks of the Nile at 
the court of Cleopatra's father, King Ptolemy, in 
which Daniels appears as a fakir, gets horribly twisted 
with circumstances, more or less of his own creating, 
in which twisting and subsequent untwisting he 
affords much amusement to the audience. The other 
opera, "The Idol's Eye," is laid in India, and to 
heighten the effect librettist Smith has brought up to 
the present day some of the ancient lore of that dis. 
tant country. By means of it he gets Daniels into a 
position the getting out of which puts the famous 
"fifteen puzzle" completely in the shade. "The Idol's 
Eye" will be presented on Wednesday, Thursday 
and Friday evenings; "The Wizard of the Nile" 
Saturday matinee and Saturday evenings. 



Los Angeles Theatre -"Two Married Men" is not 
a play without a plot like the average farce comedy of 
the day, but is a well written comedy full of the 
laughable situations and humorous complications 
that keep an audience in a continual roar of laughter. 
High class specialities are introduced consistently, 
and the incidental songs and music are of the popular 
order and just what everybody can enjoy. 

The company will appear on Sunday, Monday and 
Tuesday evenings — Feb. 5, 6 and 7. 

The play tells the ludricrous story of a man who has 
married a forgiving young wife and an unforgiving 
mother in-law. Inja Broadway cafe he meets a beau- 
tiful woman, an actress, who having forgotten to bring 
her purse, is much embarrassed in paying her check. 
The situation is relieved by the offer of the young 
man to pay the. check of 60 cents. She gives him her 



card, asks him to call at her flat in Brooklyn, and her 
servant will repay him. After 6ome time he does call 
and meets his fair charmer as she is about to 
take a drive in the park. He is invited toaccompany 
her and accepts, the two dining together later at the 
Olympia. From this time complications arise which 
lead to many extremely humorous situations, he re- 
ceives at his own home many messages all of which 
are signed Sixty Cents. Finally he receives a call 
from his quondam acquaintance and in order to get 
her out of the house before his wife and mother-in- 
law return he agrees to meet her again, as the mother- 
in-law enters he picks up a glove left by his nemesis 
which is promptly discovered by the former. 

To meet and discourage the attentions on the 
part of ths actress becomes the sole aim of the hus- 
band and his friend, an old time bachelor acquain- 
tance. The latter had a matrimonial experience 
which he adjusted by making his wife an allowance. 

The two married men meet in the house of the 
actress in Brooklyn, one being there for the purpose 
of putting a 6top to the embarrassing actions of the 
latter, the other to pay his wife her usual monthly 
allowance. The wife and mother-in-law appear on 
the scene and to the astonishment of all the actress is 
discovered to be the wife of the sympathizing friend. 
They become reconciled to each other and all ends 
well. 

The Burbank From all indications it is doubtful 
if there will be an empty seat in the Burbank Thea- 
ter next Monday evening when the curtain goes up 
on the first performance in this city of Charles Hoyt's 
best comedy effort, "A Contented Woman," presented 
as it will be with all its elaborate scenery and gor- 
geous costumes, precisely the same as produced at 
Hoyt's Theater, New York, and with its great cast of 
artists headed by Miss Belle Archer, heralded as the 
most beautiful woman now before the public. 

Messrs. Hoyt and McKee are said to have be- 
stowed upon this comedy a lavish production, which 
means that all their managerial experience in catering 
to the public taste, and which has been so success- 
fully utilized before, has been centered upon "A Con- 
tented Woman," with the result that it is claimed to 
excel anything that they have previously accom- 
plished. Every particle of scenery used in the pro- 
duction here will be brought from Hoyi's Theater, 
New York. 

Commencing with ''A Contented Woman" mati- 
nee next Wednesday, the Burbank will reserve the 
orchestra seats at the regular matinee admission 
price. Under the new rule reserved seats can be 
secured a week in advance for the matinees. 



"Tennessee's Pardner"— The engagement of "Ten- 
nessee's Pardnerat the Burbank Theater closes with 
the performance Sunday night. The regular mati- 
nee will be given Saturday afternoon. "Tennessee's 
Pardner" is the best drama of western life that has 
been presented in this city in several seasons. The 
play is good, the company good and the stage set- 
tings admirable. 



Orpheum— An event of more than usual import- 
ance in the local amusement world, is the engage- 
ment of Papinta, the great fire dancer, at the Orpheum 
next week. She is probably the greatest favorite that 
the Orpheum, among the many stars it has had, ever 
presented. During her engagement two years ago 
the house was sold out days ahead, for three weeks, 
and the same state of affairs is expected to result 
from the announcement of her appearance next week. 
Papinta has added a number of new and marvelously 
beautiful dances to her repertoire of terpsichorean 
novelties, and these are described as being the most 
striking and beautiful movements ever shown on any 
stage. Papinta, as is quite generally known, dances 
under and over, electric, many colored lights and 
uses 14 mirrors, in which all her movements are re- 
flected, so that instead of one, the audience sees fif- 
teen Papintas. Her "Volcano" dance, in which the 
beautiful girl is apparently engulfed in smoke and 
flames, emitting and shedding sparks at every move, 
will be the chiefest of her new dances. 

The Three Avolos, performers on the xylophone, 
have the reputation of being the finest artists in their 
line that Europe has ever produced. The effects 
they are able to evoke from the xylophone aro not 
obtained by any others who uso similar instruments, 
their playing being of a high order, and their selec- 
tions so difficult of rendition that ordinary artists 
never attempt them. Among these is the overture of 
William Tell. 

The cleverest juggler in the land is beyond doubt 



Max Cincinnati, who would be given the big type on 
the bill but for the preeminence of Papinta and the 
Avolos. But Cincinnati will press these stars closely 
for first honors. He does his work in so smooth a 
way and with such absolute perfection of finish, that 
the entire act is certain to prove a revelation to thea- 
ter goers. 

A charming love story told in song, is to be the 
offering to the program of Mr. Wilson and Miss 
Leicester, both singers of note in opera. Nothing 
like their performance has before been introduced in 
vaudeville. 

These wonderful acrobats and musicians, the 
Four Arbras. whose work has been the sensation of 
the week, are held over, as also Carroll and Crawford, 
the comedians. The bill, perha s the strongest 
offered at the Orpheum this season, is completed by 
Carter Dellaven and Bonnie Maie,the cleverand pre- 
cocious juvenile sketch artists. 

T3URBANK THEATER 

I) Main St., bet. Fifth and Sixth. Tel. M 1270 

C. A. SHAW, Lessee 

Sat. Matinee, Sat. and Sunday Nights — Last Times 



66 



Tennessee-'/ Partner.' 



Six Nights and usual Matinee*, Commencing Monday 

Miss Belle Archer ^TwSam 

Surrounded t>y a Munificent Oast of Artists, presenting this 
favorite Author's pet Comedy: 

©TT5 43 COMTEfflTO W®m 



FULL OF MUSIC, 

SPECIALTIES 

AND PRETTY GIRLS. 



GET IN LINE 

FOR SEATS 



LOS ANGELES THEATER m2S w 
f C. M. WOOD, and H. C. WYATT, Lessees. 

THREE NIGHTS ONLY TKBSSKBaV!' FEB. 5, 6, 7 

The Laughing Success of the Season, 

TW© n^tiflE^) HEP 

A GRAND COMPANY OF COMEDIANS, 

SPECIAL SCENERY. NOVEL SPECIALTIES, 

SPARKLING WIT, PRETTY GIRLS. 
Special Prices for this occasion— 15c, 25c, 85c and 50c. 
Tel. Main 70. Seats now on tale. 



COH I NG ATTKACTION— THE BEST AM) BIGGEST 
or ALL. 

FMPI MN1ELI 

Iu his Two Big Comic Opera Successes. 
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY 

"TG1E DI^OL'J [EYE" 

AND SATURDAY MATINEE AND EVENING, 

31 THE WIZARD SF TIH1E NILE" 

Both Operas produced here by the same entire Cast and 
Scenerv as seen at the Broadway Theater. New York City. 
Seats now ob sale. PRICES— 25c, 50c, 75c, S1.00 and |1.50. 
Tel. Main 70. 

MAIN STEEET 
BET. FIRST 
AND 8E00ND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vandeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, Feb. 6. 

I'apinta the Glorious, the Grand Spectacular Dancer. 
The Musical Avolos, World's Greatest Xylophone Players. 
Max Cincinnati, Europe's Greatest Trick Jugglers. 
Ernest Wilson and) Presenting a Charming Love Story, 
Marie Leicester i told in song. 

The Arbra Troupe (4 1, an Acrobatic Musical Novelty. 
Johnnie Caroll and/ 




Addie Crawford | 



Clever American Artists. 



Carter Dcllnyen ) America's Greatest Juvenile Sketch Art 
and Bonnie Male J ists in "A Naval Reserve." 
EVENING 25 and 50 cts, gallery 10c. Matinees Wednesday 
Saturday and Sunday, any seat in the house 25c 



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McCALL'S Patterns are the Best 




Dress Patterns at $6.00 

Our Dress Goods Store, always a safe and econom- 
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Western Graphic 




Los Angeles, Saturday, February U, 1899. 



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FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 



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WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VI. 
Number 6. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, February U, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
lo Cents a Copy 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

ben. c. Truman :-: :-: :-: editor 




^pHE PUBLISHERS of the Western 
Graphic return thanks to the people of 
IjOS Angeles and vicinity for their apprecia- 
tion and patronage during the past few weeks, 
and are the more gratified because they have 
indulged in no self horn-blowing or self-gra- 
tulation whatever. We had promised before 
the new year agreeable surprises in letter 
press and engraving, and are carrying out our 
promises at more than double the expense of 
last year per week, as every reader of our pap- 
er will perceive. Most all the engravings each 
week are made expressly for this paper and 
not a single old or "stock" engraving was used 
in our Pasadena or Horse Show edition. Our 
editorial department is in charge of a gentle- 
man famous for his general newspaper ability; 
our theatrical reviews are prepared by one of 
the best critics in Southern California and our 
Town Talk and Prattle by one of the most 
graphic writers in the state, and our general 
matter by a careful manager. Our Manila 
letters are exclusively our own, written by a 
special correspondent, formerly an attache of 
this paper, and they are as interesting as any 
to be found in eastern or other papers. Our 
regular editions are large and increasing and 
our special editions — averaging one per month 
— larger and finer than has ever been at- 
tempted by others. Our society column is 
devoted to the movements and whereabouts 
of what are generally termed onr "best 
classes," and our regular Pasadena letter 
pleasantly sets forth the doings of the 400 of 
our sister town. Regular advertisers receive 
the benefit of all our extra editions and are 
always sure that their ads. are not up against 
something repelling, as no doctors' ads. or 
other indecent "business" are admitted to our 
columns. The Western Graphic seeks the 
portals of all respectable places and nothing 
that cannot be read aloud in the family circle 
will find a place in its columns. Advertisers 
and heads of families may assure themselves 
of this feature. 

On pages 4 and 5 will be found the first 
instalment of Major Truman's serial, which 
will run through twenty numbers, entitled 
" Divorced on the Desert." Two thousand 
sample copies will be sent out, and the 
Western Graphic will be mailed, postage 
free, for six (6) months for $1.00. Besides 
this story there will be the usual high class 
reading matter and illustrations, on polo, 
theatricals, architecture, golf, and all the cur- 
rent events of fetching and dramatic charac- 
ter. Address Publishers of Western Graphic. 
Terms, $2 per annum, $1 for 6 months, 50c 
for three months. Telephone 1053 Main. 

Publishers ok Western Graphic. 



The ratification of the Treaty of Paris 



was a foregone conclusion by all close students 
of political history and resembles other acts 
of that august body to the extent that there 
are always Senators in the breech if required. 
There were extreme members who, while they 
greatly desired to stand by party requirements 
during the attempted impeachment of Presi- 
dent Johnson, were ready to impair their poli- 
tical fealty rather than see the radical scheme 
to make Ben Wade President and precipitate 
disquiet at the end of a long war. In other 
words if Ross of Kansas had not been counted 
on as the man to cast the needed vote to pre- 
vent impeachment, Morgan of New York had 
promised to make the sacrifice. Ergo, if 
Jones of Nevada and Mclnnery of Louisiana 
had not come to the rescue of the Treaty some 
other Senators would have been found. It 
was not possible for the Treaty to have been 
defeated. It would have been a wicked dis- 
grace, and the American people would have 
shown their tremendous indignation in noun- 
certain way. 

The most glorious news of the week was 
tha from Manila announcing a great battle and 
a greater victory over the battalions of Agui- 
naldo by the American soldiers and sailors. 
The former made the attack and was over- 
whelmingly repulsed at all points, the land 
and sea forces each displaying the usual 
bravery, discipline and staying qualities so 
often depicted during the present year. Gen- 
eral Otis seems to have had his small army 
in good shape for any emergency, and Admir- 
al Dewey, of course, was just in condition and 
position to administer allopathic treatment. 
Spain rejoices over Aguinaldo's movement in 
force against a civilized enemy. But this is 
just like Spain. It rejoiced over its murders 
and persecutions of a hundred thousand 
Jews in times gone by. It rejoiced over its 
murders and tortures of a million Protestants 
in a few hundred years. It rejoiced over our 
internal strife half a century ago. And it re- 
joiced over the destruction of the Maine with 
its hundreds of sleeping sailors. But the 
damnable old black spot on the map of Eu- 
rope has had more chickens come home to 
roost than any other nation. 

That our brave soldiers and sailors did 
not get thrashed at Manila is no fault of those 
Senators who did all in their power to defeat 
the Treaty of Paris and to wear out the 
American spirit. It is a curious fact that there 
were many Senators who opposed the war of 
1812, the Mexican war, the Civil war and the 
Spanish war. The same grade of men opposed 
the Louiaiana, Gadsden and Alaska purchases 
and the free gift of Hawaii — and great and 
abundant good has resulted from all of these 
events. These same men would see a line of 
battleships named after all the states in the 
Union sunk with all on hoard, as the Maine 
was, and then jockey over the modes of pun- 
ishment. We obtained the Philippines as one 
of the results of war on account of the dia- 
bolical sinking of the Maine, and we are going 
to hold them because it is proper and patriotic 
to do so — and sugar, politics and religion 
must take back seats during the controversy. 

The mention of Mr. J. S. Slauson for 



United States Senator, if materialization 
could result, would be something for the 
whole State, and particularly Southern Cali- 
fornia, to congratulate itself upon, for Mr. 
Slauson is able, sound, honest, aggressive and 
affable. He is one of the most liberal and 
charitable men in our midst and would make 
the best successor to Stephen M. White that 
has yet been named, and he would resemble 
Senator White to this acceptable extent — you 
would always know where to find him, and 
that would never be in the ranks of jingoes or 
demagogues. 

General Eagan, who was sentenced to 
dismissal from the Army on account of his 
outrageous assault on General Miles, his 
superior officer, has been partly let off by the 
President commuting said sentence to six 
years, which permits Eagan to draw his pay 
proper all the time and to return to duty in 
time to be retired. Considering Eagan's 
bravery on the field of battle the President's 
feeling interference may not be improper. 
The episode should be a lesson to all men 
never to get mad all over unless they are 
willing to chance extreme consequences. Gen- 
eral Miles has behaved like a gentleman 
all the way through. General Eagan has 
not behaved like a gentleman at all, and the 
press and people of the country are unan- 
imous regarding his severe punishment. 

Tomorrow, February 12, is the ninetieth 
anniversary of the birthday of Abraham 
Lincoln, one of the greatest and purest men 
who has ever lived, and whose greatness be- 
comes more and more understood and esti- 
mated as his character is studied by all 
peoples of civilization. There are few illus- 
trious personages that grow greater and love- 
lier as they are studied by the critical students 
of history today. One of these is Lincoln, 
whose great human goodness can never be 
effaced nor forgotten. What a fortunate 
country ours, indeed, to have had a Washing- 
ton and a Lincoln ! 



There was intense solicitude throughout 
the city during the week over the news from 
Manila, as there are a number of well-known 
volunteers there from this city, conspicuously 
General H. G. Otis, who was in the fight, and 
whose courage upon many a well-contested 
field is a guaranty that he will be gazetted in 
good shape. Chief of Police Glass and Charlie 
White each has a son who has already been at 
the front; and Captain Thorn, himself an in 
trepid soldier of the South, who distinguished 
himself on many a sanguinary field, has two 
fine boys who left here upon President McKin- 
ley's first call for troops, and who, from merit, 
quickly went from the ranks to positions of 
non-commissioned officers, and whose whole 
deportment shows that they have got the good 
stuff of their father about them. There are 
others whose names I do not recall, but the 
hearts of our people go out to them all, and 
the trust that they may go through without 
harm and in due time return to their loved 
ones at home is shared by the entire com- 
munity. 



The twentieth century is drawing nearer 
every day. and several millions of people are 
still anxiously debating when it will begin. 



4 



Western Graphic 



DIVORCED ON THE DESERT 



OR 



The Vicissitudes of a Pioneer's Life 

A True Story of the Pacific Coast 



By Ben C. Truman 

Author of "Semi-Tropical California," "Occidental Sketches," "Homes 
and Happiness in California," " Tourists' Illustrated Guiue," 
"Crescent City and Golden Gate," "History of the 
World's Fair in Chicago," The Field of Honor," 
See How It Sparkles," Etc., Etc. 




CHAPTER I 

Copyrighted ls9'.i by Geo. Rice * Sons 



Jitter 

NDREW JACKSON HATHA- 
way, in 1849, was a well-to-do 
young farmer of Iowa, with a 
wife precisely such as a thriving 
young farmer should possess.The 
father of Hathaway had served 
under Jackson, at New Orleans, 
and belonged to a prime family 
of Tennessee.which had formerly 
lived in Virginia, and had good 
revolutionary blood in its veins. Andrew Jackson Hathaway's father's 
helpmeet came from a representative Rhode Island family; and, ac- 
cording to the archives of Providence Plantations, a family renowned 
for its deeds of valor during the "times that tried men's souls." This 
little bit of pedigree has nothing much to do with the tale that follows, 
although pedigree sometimes helps a man as it almost always does a 
horse. And, again, it is well to show that our Hathaway family had a 
pedigree that any American might be proud of; for Mrs. Hathaway, too, 
came from good revolutionary stock, with an even divide of Massachu- 
setts and South Carolina in its make-up. Her name was Vashti, she 
having been christened after an old maiden aunt of Fall River, Massa- 
chusetts. Andrew and Vashti grew up on neighboring farms in Ohio. 
It may not be uninteresting, right here, to state that the young love 
that had existed between Andrew and Vashti had not been entirely un- 
interrupted — on account of the youth of the parties, however, nothing 
else — and, whether they had cared or not whether the "man in the 
moon was looking," had each kept an eye upon the nocturnal move- 
ments of "the old stormer" (as Andrew had disrespectfully nick-named 
his sweetheart's suspecting sire), as night after night they exchanged 
sentiment, and something else, you may be sure, over the front yard 
gate. 

It was upon one of these delightful interludes that Andrew and 
Vashti had plighted their troth, a? had Lucy and Lord Rutherford, al- 
most two centuries before, by breaking a silver coin between them, and 
had mutually invoked malediction on whichever of the two should be 
false to the compact. 

It is likewise well to state, to keep up the connection, that Andrew 
and Vashti were married at the home of the latter in Ohio, in January, 
1835; and that Janet Dalrymple Hathaway, their only child, was born 
during the first month of the following year. Andrew's father and 
mother died in 1840, and Andrew inherited the Hathaway estate. In 
1846 he and his family moved to Iowa, and here Hathaway successfully 
farmed it until the winter of 1S49-50. 

It was a bitter cold day in December, 1849. The snow was piled 
four feet deep on a level, and the mercury marked 24° below zero. That 
day Deacon Hathaway — for Andrew had joined the village church and 
had been made a pillar thereof — had two logging chains snapped into 
pieces by the intense cold ; and the realization of some other mishaps 
had made him red hot, although the atmosphere was unmistakably 
Siberian. Deacon as he was, Hathaway expectorated a multiplicity of 
Flanders oaths that day, and his arrival home was marked by no dis 
tinguishing exhibitions of serenity. Indeed, so exercised was Hatha- 
way, that, while in the act of pulling off his boots, he became enraged 
and kicked one of them clean through the window. This little episode 
elicited a broad grin from Janet, and the remark that she thought that 



Jackson— a white mule, not the head of the family, of course — had 
kicked over the corn crib; then Janet glanced sympathetically at her 
mother— who had burst into tears simultaneously with the flight of the 
apparel aforesaid — and then joined that good woman in her demonstra- 
tion of grief. Andrew took in the domestic tableaux at once, and, dis- 
patching his daughter for the boot, patted Vashti upon the forehead, 
and said: 

"I'm not mad at you, dear, so, don't cry. Don't cry, now, and 
make me more miserable than I am. I am miserable enough, the Lord 
knows. I get up in the morning with an angel, it seems to me, and re- 
tire with the devil at night. That's a fact; and I start out every day in 
the sunshine, and get into the clouds long before dark I do my level 
best to discover the proverbial silver lining, but when I do it is so in- 
fernally transparent that its influences carry with them no particularly 
exhilarating effect: I joined the church, by George! and made a ninny 
of myself passing the confounded old contribution box around 
amongst a lot of sneering sinners once or twice Sundays,and have made 
no very substantial friends from that standpoint, if I know myself, 
theoretically, and I rather think I do— that's right, darling, cry, cry, 
cry! and make me feel life a horse-thief — oh! don't cry! don't cry! I'm 
not mad at you, you know. I'm not mad at you." 

"I know you're not mad at me Andrew," remarked Mrs. Hatha- 
way, "but you lose control of yourself so much, lately, that you make 
things very unpleasant at times. You ought to see that, and you ought 
to be ashamed of yourself — I say this very feelingly, Andrew, for I love 
you, oh! very, very much — but here is Janny growing up so very fast; 
and, my dear, you ought to, at least, set her no bad examples Only a 
week ago you came home in another fit, and ripped off your back sus- 
pender buttons in your anger." 

"Hut, Vashti " 

"Oh, you invariably have an excuse. I know things do not always 
go as you would like U have them; but there's no excuse in your get- 
ting wild with passion — and especially in the presence of your daugh- 
ter. It nearly breaks her dear little heart to see you in such fits of 
anger. Another thing, now that we are upon the subject, let me tell 
you, Andrew: — that you are not only violent, and very violent, too, in 
your temper, at times, but you are the most obstinate creature in Iowa. 
You are simply immovable when once you make up your mind, even 
though destruction should stare you in the face. You never consult 
me, either, in any of your movements; and when you make up your 
mind to do a thing, nothing except disappointment or disaster can 
change you." 

" Well, darling, now that you are mechanically-well wound up, go 
it. Don't ltt yourself run down until you have completely polished me 
off. I deserve it all. I'm an infernal old fool and an impostor, of 
course; and I'm always all wrong, and you are always all right. Pro- 
ceed with your periodical lecture, my perfect one; I'm nothing but a 
confounded old simpleton, you know; so, proceed!" 

" Well, now, as a general thing, don't you think it would be better, 
first, to make me acquainted with your projects, or some of them, and 
let me put my little stock of wisdom and womanly plans together with 
your hopes and undertakings? Two heads, you know, Andrew, are said 
to be better than one, and it strikes me that husband and wife should 
be full partners; and it would be so pleasant, too. I want to share with 
you, as you ought to know, in all your pleasures and griefs, in all your 
prosperities and adversities. I want to be a part of you in all things, 
and at all times and places. I know you love me, and I know we get 
along pretty well, generally. And, were it not for your temper and 
obstinacy, we should be the happiest couple in the world. Now, I say 
this from the standpoint of affection, Andrew, and I say it for your own 
good, and for the happiness and future prosperity of you, my dear hus- 
band, myself and our darling daughter." 

During this speech Mrs. Hathaway and Janet had prepared the 
evening meal; Andrew had plugged up the hole in (he window with 
some cast-off garment, and the family sat down to supper. 

The silence which followed Mrs. Hathaway's speech was broken by 
Janet, who inquired: 

" Papa, mamma says we are going to start for California in the 
spring. Is that really 60?" 

" That U really so," responded the father. 

"Yes, dear girl, we start for California in the spring," interrupted 
Mrs Hathaway. Your father apprised me of his intention a few days 
ago, and that settles it. Neither of us has the slightest knowledge re- 
garding that far-off country, altli3ugh the St. Louis papers are full of 
glowing descriptions of the beautiful land of flowers and gold. Lots of 
Iowa folks are already making arrangements to depart for California in 
the spring, and I don't mind breaking up and going further West once 
more." 



Western Graphic 



5 



" They tell me thai you can pick 
old rivers and on the 
roads out there in 
California," said Jan- 
et. " I don't believe 
that, but I do believe 
it's a better place than 
Iowa ; it's too cold 
here; I don't like the 
winters here at all." 

"You are right, my 
child," remarked Mr. 
Hathaway, "the win- 
ters in California are 
as mild as they are in 
Louisiana and Flor- 
ida, so Fremont and 



up 



gold in the beds of the 




The Hathaway outfit on its way to the promised laud 



other reliable writers and travelers say, and that is one reason why I 
want to go there. It is an old saying that a rolling stone gathers no 
moss, I know, and it may be a true one; but I have rolled so long, and 
so often, that I am going to try it once more. From the little I can 
glean from the newspapers, and from other sources of information, I 
am of the opinion that it is just the country for us to go to." 

Spring came, and May found the Hathaways, with one good team 
and wagon, half a dozen steers, a cow, two saddle horses, and a good 
stock of provisions, on their way to California. 

The little party had good luck, losing none of their stock, except 
the cow, and meeting neither hostile Indians nor thieving white men. 

From the moment they crossed the Missouri river, however, Hatha- 
way's program of action was seldom ever interfered with, and never 
with any degree of success. He consulted neither Mrs. Hathaway nor 
any other living person. He made and broke camps whenever and 
wherever he pleased, watered his stock whenever he saw tit, and sought 
advice of no one and no thing except a map and a dial. 

Upon leaving Salt Lake Mrs. 'Hathaway hazarded a suggestion 
touching a choice of roads; but, during the controversy which naturally 
followed, Janet stood by her father: and the mother, as a matter of 
course, yielded. But Mrs. Hathaway said: 

" As we are divided in our opinion as to which is the best road, 
Andrew, I will yield, as I always do; but I would like to ask you one 
question: Suppose / had not yielded my preference, and suppose Janny 
had preferred my road, what would you have done under the circum- 
stances?" 

" What would / have done? Why, my dear, good woman, I would 
have gone right on, just as I am going and have been going from the 
start — just as if no one were here but myself. I am at the head or this 
expedition, and it must go my way. I don't propose to take advice from 
an old woman and a youngster just in her teens, in this section of the 
wilderness — not as the roads are. I don't consider your judgment good 
in the premises, however much you may consult authorities. I have 
got a map and a general description of the country through which we 
are traveling, and I am going to stick to them if I never reach Cali- 
fornia." 

" Why, Andrew!" 

"Nol there's no why AndrewX about it. It is common-sense de- 
cision and there can be no appeal. I'll say this, though: Whenever, in 
your exceeding wisdom, you deem my course of pilgrimage uncertain or 
unsatisfactory, you may go some other way or take the back track alto- 
gether; and you may take the whole outfit with you, except the poorest 
saddle horse you may graciously permit your hen-pecked poorer half to 
pick out. Now, I want you to remember, once for all, Vashti, that I 
am infernally tired of your fault-finding and with your absurd geo- 
graphical and topographical intimations and suggestions. I am deter- 
mined to have my own way! — do you understand that? — and whenever 
you want to go contrary to my way, let us separate." 

" Why, Andrew Hathaway, what a speech!" ejaculated the wife. 
" Why, I am amazed at you." And the good woman and her daughter 
sobbed bitterly. 

It was several days before perfect harmony again prevailed in the 
Hathaway camp, which, however, when it did set in, lasted until the 
party arrived at a point on the Humboldt desert where the Lassen trail 
intersects that of the Carson. 

At this point there had congregated some forty odd persons, all of 
whom, but Hathaway, had concluded to take the Carson trail. Mrs. 
Hathaway was aware that her husband's map pointed out the Lassen 
road as the one to be followed. She, however, preferred the Carson trail, 
for the reason that a big crowd was going that way; and further, be- 
cause Janet had besought her to prevail upon her father to change his 
mind. Thus fortified, Mrs. Hathaway approached her husband, who 
was seated on a pile of blankets repairing a bridle. 



It was a radiant morning in September, and all things in nature 
seemed to smile. The imperial orb rode up the eastern sky and flung 
its gorgeous splendors upon the majestic Sierra, which rose like battle- 
ments before it. There was inspiration in the scene and sublimity in 
the solitude of that vast landscape untouched by hand of art. 

Mrs. Hathaway opened the conversation by saying, in dulcet tones: 
" Andrew, I was just thinking, as I gazed upon those magnificent 
elevations, of the greatness of God. I have been in the most perfect 
state of enchantment for an hour, nDt only in surveying the mountains 
before us and the desert behind us, but in meditating upon the con- 
spicuous creations 



of our 
Father, 
felt my 
littleness 



Heavenly 
I never 
complete 
and in- 



feriority so much 
before; and, in the 
contemplation of 
the mysteries which 
transcend the scope 
of earthly penetra- 
tion, I recall an 
anecdote of your 
father's, the effect 
of which has for 
many years been 
engraven upon the 
tablets of my heart 
dolph of Roanoke. 




My 



alt dual and alkali for a yood many 

mil's." 

-I mean the one he used to tell of old John Ran- 
Randolph was walking one evening, accompanied 
by a favorite boy, you remember. All at once, arrested by a magnificent 
sunset in that incomparable section of Virginia known as the Shenan- 
doah Valley, he violently seized the nigger and said: ' Juba, if any man 
ever tells you there is no God, tell him that John Randolph says he 
lies!' The same sentiment seems to have taken possession of me as I 
gaze upon the Sierra Nevada mountains. By-the-by, Andrew, there is 
a man in the party here who has made the trip over the Sierra several 
times. He calls the mountains before us the rim of the golden valley, 
but says there is no time to be lost in getting over them, as the snow 
generally commences to descend in October, and sometimes falls to a 
depth of twenty odd feet. I wish you would have a little chat with him 
after you have mended that bridle, as he is greatly opposed to the 
Lassen trail. He says it is all dust and alkali for a good many miles." 

" He does, eh? Well, you just tell Mr. Knows-It-All that I like 
dust and alkali, and for that very reason, if for no other, I am going to 
take the Lassen road. I half thought your old John Randolph story 
and other utterances were a blind to get at the softer part of me, but 
you can't do it," replied Hathaway, roughly. "Sentiment is one thing 
and judgment is another. You can't juggle me off the right road by 
any old Shenandoah Valley anecdotes, or by any other female trickery. 
I am going to go right along and mind my own business over the Lassen 

trail, if it leads me straight to " 

* "Oh, heavens," shrieked Mrs. Hathaway. 
"Wrong again in your topography, my dear," responded her ob- 
stinate husband; " I meant the other place, surely — and I a deacon, by 
all that's ridiculous!" 

" But," said Vashti, feelingly, " Janet wants to go by the Carson 
trail. The whole party, in fact, start off in that direction in an hour." 

" All right, let them start; that don't interfere with my plans, in 
the least. My map directs me to go by the Lassen, and I am going that 
way, if I go alone." 

"Than you may go alone, Andrew Hathaway!" said Vashti, with 
unmistakable force and composure. 

" What! you take the Carson trail, and I the Lassen?" 
" That is precisely the situation, unless you consent to yield for 
once in your life, Mr. Hathaway," rejoined Vashti. 
" And Janet, she—" 

"Proceeds with her mother by the Carson trail," added Mrs. 
Hathaway. 

"But you will become the laughing-stock of the whole party." 

"You are the laughing-stock of the whole party, and I am heartily 
ashamed of you." 

" But this is a serious turn affairs have taken, and you may regret 
it," said Andrew. 

"It is most serious, Mr. Hathaway, and I regret that circumstances 
force me to act as I do," replied his wife. 

"Then do as I want you to. I would rather stay right here all 
winter than take the Carson trail." 

"And I would remain right here all winter and the summer follow- 
ing before I would go one foot by the Lassen. My mind is made up; I 
propose to start in an hour. What do you say?" 

"What do I say? I say you may go your way, and I will go 
mine!" 

TO BE CONTINUED 



6 



Western Graphic 




In the Gay Life 

"T^HK Horse Show stimulated the sale of 
1 silk hats to such an extent that at the 
present time there is scarcely one of strictly 
up-to-date blocking in stock among our local 
dealers. It is but a few years since a swallow- 
tail, boiled shirt, plug hat and kids, with a 
gold cable watch chain, would have been con- 
sidered the proper thing, while to-day a 
dress coat, top hat, Inverness and pumps are 
correct. All the modern expressions compris- 
ing good form have been called into requisition 
to emphasize the extreme elegance of our 
jeunesse doree and ctourdi youths during the 
sessions of the private circus. Such phrases 
as haut ton, en regie, beau monde, fa<;on, elite, 
a la mode, genre, comme il faut, recherche, 
degage, and de bon gout, have been plucked 
from " French self taught " handbooks and 
used in the most facile manner by our re 
porters. 

Some of the " tiles " on exhibition at the 
Horse Show must have antedated '49 and 
crossed the plains with Fremont. Certain it 
is, they ran the gamut of styles for the past 
fifty years at least, and many might even, like 
the "Entailed Hat" of "Gath," have been in- 
herited. There was the hat that might have 
officiated at weddings and funerals of past 
generations, the hat "I bought in London, 
you know," and again another, " when I was 
best man the first time"; but paramount was 
"rry Horse Show hat" bought for the occasion. 
In the larger cities, top hats, as well as wigs, 
can be rented, and the price of many loge seats 
and theatre tickets would have been saved our 
aspiring-for-elegance young men if such a 
system were in practice here. 

Whenever hereafter Hermann, or any 
other necromancer, demands a silk hat of an 
audience, there will be no such skirmishing as 
heretofore before one can be produced, for we 
have had our first Horse Show and are now 
prepared for any emergency. 

The top hat, which has now become co- 
extensive with civilization, was not evolved in 
a moment of inspiration, like many other 
things, but was the outcome of many centuries 
of folly and fashion. It has a fine long an- 
cestry behind it, and will undoubtedly outlive 
the vituperation of those who wear it. The 
original rilk hat was worn in Florence late in 
the last century, and took the English fancy 
to such a degree that manufacturers came from 
Italy to set up establishments in England. 
It is now an enormous industry there, that 
country alone exporting annually more than 
one million "toppers" to all parts of the world. 
Its manufacture was not introduced into 
France until 1825, and its development has 
taken place entirely since that period. Lyons 
and Paris, Manchester and Denton. New Jersey 
and New York, are all large producers of these 
"swell" headwear, the imported article, of 
course, taking preference. 

And the universal edict went forth — How- 
well our men looked at the Horse Show! Let 
us, therefore, all drink a silent toast to the 

silk hat. 

****** 

Mrs. J. E. Plater of the Baker Block en- 
tertained at luncheon on Tuesday. The cen- 
terpiece was composed of jonquils and ferns 
and was most pleasing as such a table decora- 



tion always is. The guests included Mes- 
dames Henry T. Lee, S. C. Hubbell, John 
Wigrnore, Charles Forman, A. H. Naftzgar, J. 
Ross Clark and John B. Millar of Pasadena. 

Dr. J. J. Choat entertained at dinner at 
Levy's on Monday evening, followed by a box 
party at the Burbank. His guests were Mrs. 
J. P. Worthing of New York, the Misses Isa- 
bella Wolfskill, Ellena Wolfskill and Jose- 
phine Bernard; Messrs. William Cornwell, 
Oscar Lawler and Dr. E. M. Pallette. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. It. Kellam of Menlo 
avenue entertained at dinner on Monday, fol- 
lowed by a box party at the Horse Show. The 
affair was complimentary to Mrs. Kellam's 
sister, Miss Lillian Reed of Arizona, and the 
others of the party were Miss Anna Mullins 
and Harry B. Ainsworth of Redondo. 

The Midwinter Cotillion Club gives a 
dance at Kramer's Hall next Tuesday evening. 
The following ball will be the last of the sea- 
son. 

The Casa des Roses Club will give another 
party in the quaint building of that name on 
Adams and Hoover streets this evening. The 
club is composed principally of young mar- 
ried people of that section of town. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard M. Sale of Hill 
street entertained Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fay and 
their guests, Miss Christie of Chicago and 
Miss Falder of Michigan, at their Terminal 
Island cottage on Sunday. The others of the 
party were Mr. and Mrs. Lorain D. Sale and 
Miss Anna Fay. The day was pleasantly 
spent in luncheon and dinner, bathing, boat- 
ing and delightful hours on the beach. 

Miss Beatrice Fox of West Seventh street 
gave a tea on Wednesday afternoon to meet 
Mrs. Frederick Bixby of Long Beach, enter- 
taining about thirty guests. The floral dec- 
orations were charmingly arranged; jonquils, 
violets and roses with ferns and smilax mak- 
ing a pretty setting for the dainty frocks of 
the ladies. Assisting the hostess were Mrs. 
Fox and the Misses Elliott, McConnell, Mil- 
ler, True, Craemer, Allen and Elleanor Craig 
of Lamanda Park. 

Mrs. 0. G. Mullins and the Misses Mullins 
of Ellendale Place entertained the Monday 
Musical Club at their regular meeting this 
week. The program was made up of the fol- 
lowing numbers: trio for violin, 'cello and 
piano, the Misses Mary Mullins, Blanche Rog- 
ers and Clara Bosbyshell; vocal solos by Mrs. 
Katherine Kimball Forrest, Miss Minnie Rop- 
ers, Mrs. Abbie Gilman Fletcher, Mrs. Shel- 
ley Tolhurst and Mrs. J. J. Schalbert; piano 
solos, Miss Carrie Conger and Miss Clara Bos- 
byshell; violin, Mrs. Dora James Clark; duet, 
violin and piano, the Misses Mullins and Rog 
ers. Refreshments concluded the afternoon. 

The Tuesday Morning Musical Club met 
this week at the home of Professor William 
Cogswell on Flower street. A short paper on 
the art of music teaching and talents required 
w^s read and the regular- class work followed 
the program which was composed of "Polly 
Hillis" by De Arne,Miss SaranCogswell; "Cre- 
ole Love Song,'' by B. B. Smith, Miss Freda 
Hellman; Berceuse, by Godard. Miss A. 
Crosby; "Heart's Delight," by Gilchrist, Miss 
Eveline Hamburger; Berceuse by Strelezki, 
Mrs. A. C. Smither, with violin obligato by 
Miss Suzanne Cogswell; "Girls of Seville," by 
Danze, Mrs. C. E. Washburn; "The Minstrel 
and I," by Hinrichs, Miss Suzanne Cogswell. 

Mrs. W. D. Babcock of South Alvarado 
street asked some thirty 'adies for Thursday 
afternoon, and amid rooms bedecked with 
greens and gay with flowers, the pleasant 
hours were spent with the noted men of let- 
ters. Roses were everywhere, vases of pale 



amber roses, baskets of brilliant pink roses, 
bowls of crimson roses — dainty fragrant and 
lovely. And there were violets, great beds 
and bunches amid their leaves and fern fronds- 
how sweetly pretty they were. All the lights 
burned under tinted shades and the greens of 
palms and smilax were arranged for the best 
effects. And of course there was luncheon, 
and altogether it was one of the most thor- 
oughly delightful afternoons of the season. 

Miss Lou Winder of South Hope street 
gave a small whist partv on Tuesday evening 
complimentary to Miss Anna Fay's guests, 
Miss Christie of Chicago and Miss Feldher of 
Michigan. About twenty-five young people 
were asked to meet the visitors. Miss Irene 
Stephens and Guy Baldwin were awarded the 
priz 8, a gold belt buckle and a book. 

Mrs. Margaret Hughes, Mrs. Shoemaker 
and Mrs. Butler of St. James Park were the 
hostesses at a beautiful lunch party given on 
Thursday complimentary to Mrs. Joseph H. 
Johnson, wife of the Bishop, and Mrs. Charles 
E. Spalding, wife of the new rector of St. 
Paul's. About the round table were feated 
Mesdames W. L. Graves, Earl B. Millar, John 
Wigmore, Hugh H. Walker, John Shirley 
Ward, C. C Carpenter and Miss Esther 
Lowell. A circle of handsome Battenberg 
lace, a mirror and a tall vase of silver and 
cut glass filled with jonquils and ferns formed 
the table decoration. A nosegay of the flowers, 
ribbon tied, was at each cover. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. K. Rule of West Wash- 
ington street gave a box party at the Los 
Angeles theater on Wednesday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Garretson of Orange 
street entertained the Orange Street Whist 
Club on Thursday evening, the members and 
guests forming a party cf about fifty. The 
score cards and table markers were the brush 
work of the hostess and were embelished with 
ballet girls and delicate lettering. The floral 
decorations of the house were exceptionally 
elaborate, many bows and streamers of rib- 
bons intermingling with the greens and lovely 
blossoms. 

Among the distinguished persons who 
have been here for a week past are Mr. R. H. 
Pratt, for so many years assistant general 
superintendent of the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany, and Mrs. Pratt and Mrs. M H. Sher- 
man, who have been making their time merry 
by visits to Mount Lowe, Santa Catalina and 
elsewhere. 



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Western Graphic 



7 



Town Talk and prattle 

THE polo matches of Tuesday and polo 
pony races of Wednesday out at Agri- 
cultural Park failed to draw, only a few people 
being present at either meeting. 

The projectors and managers of the Horse 
Show must be thanked fervently for present- 
ing to the people of Los Angeles the most 
elegant and pretentious event that our city 
has ever bet n treated to. And also those 
others who made the exhibition possible by 
purchasing boxes. And when we consider 
the state of the atmosphere throughout, which 
was by far the longest stretch of cold and 
windy weather ever known here, the affair 
was a marvelous success and passed off with 
less friction than ever heard of at a like exhi- 
bition, for it is almost generally the rule and 
not the exception that more or less fault is 
found by disappointed ones over the deci- 
sions. Few complaints of this kind were 
made, and only one in which the complainant 
forgot that he was a thoroughbred and be- 
came mad all over and withdrew his stock 
after agreeing, with all others, to let it remain 
until the close. Others to be thanked are all 
who made entries and abided by the rules 
and agreements and who did their level best 
to contribute toward the ensemble. The next 
one will be a tremendous success, as there 
will be provisions made against cold and 
wind and rain. It is an honor to any city to 
have a horse show, and the success and glory 
of the one just held will stimulate all owners 
and breeders of horses < f all classes to do a 
great deal better next time, and there will be 
scores of people right in our midst who will 
want to give cups and bowls and plate as 
special premiums ai engenderers of elegant 
and slashing competition. Again we say, all 
honor to every one who contributed toward 
such a splendid advertisement of our beauti- 
ful city, and particularly Mr. and Mrs. Sever- 
ance, Mr. Wooster, Messrs. Hobart, Parrott, 
Baldwin, and others of San Francisco; C. P. 
Huntington, James D. Phelan and others who 
gave cups and bowls and plate; Walter Moore 
and the Los Angeles Fire Department; and, 
last but not least, to Boreas for not blowing 
the whole durned outfit down on the second 
day. 

Next to the performance of "Green's Ru- 
fus" the "observed of all observers" among 
the "smart set" that occupied boxes at the 
Horse Show was the returned exile to Hono- 
lulu. He was quickly snapped up by abun- 
dant women and placed in a loge near his 
quondam landlady — the word he uses is un- 
like quondam so far as the first syllable is 
concerned — and there he sat scared nearly to 
death for fear some fair widow might invite 
him to her mansion to partake of such ostenta- 
tious viands as soft boiled eggs. He was the very 
personification of solitude, and once or twice 
when he essayed a smile it seemed a combina- 
tion of hula-hula disappointments and Brown's 
bronchial troches. He was as innocent as a 
yellow-jacket trying to soft-soap honey from a 
bee, and the quivering of his muscles betrayed 
his dying to get out and join the high-rolling 
acrobats from Palm Springs. Not all the 
concatenation of satin and jockey club and 
mobility of eye and lip inspired him with 
that irrepressible fluency and beauty of extra 



dry utterance that characterizes the personnel 
of the elder of the Palm Springs aggregation 
after the disposal of the 'sieenth altitudinous 
sphere before the ringing of the curfew bell. 

What this pallid nerve center of Utopia 
needed for a number of years was a high social 
character— and it at last got it in Peter Dona- 
hue Martin. And what it would do without 
Peter must be left to the capricious of thought 
and creation. There were more apprehensions 
that Peter might not turn up as a patron of 
the Horse Show than there were concerning 
the inability of appearance of all the Hobarts 
and Parrotts and the entire Los Angeles jeun- 
esse doree. That a season should pass away 
at the Arcadia or Del Monte without this 
Ida'an Ganymede from the jardin des cacti of 
Indio and Palm Springs was more painfully 
shocking than the play of Hamlet with an 
elimination of the character of the melan- 
choly Dane. There is no other young blood 
on the Pacific Coast of so exclusive propor- 
tions, none other so fantastic and original — 
in no startling respect has he a counterpart. 
And so, when he came unannounced and un 
catalogued into the arena the first day and 
cantered around the elliptical, tall and thin as 
a distilled bamboo and intellectually as sal- 
low as a frost-nipped spiral of smilax clad in 
a tread-mtll cap and a pepper-and-salt sack 
and waistcoat that suggested a reminiscence of 
Philippine servitude, there was at once radi- 
ance throughout the audience and the occu- 
pants of the one hundred dollar mezzanines 
gasped with exhilaration and content. And 
the newspaper scribes — they at once became 
enlivened and sharpened up their No. 2 Fabers, 
for now there was something more attractive 
than the parade of four horse ice trucks and 
the high jumper Tadpole that never made a 
high jump. There was Peter, sure, the gay 
and festive Peter, who is passing the Vesuvius 
of his youth without, the obnoxious companion • 
ship of a "better half," although ninety-nine 
out of every hundred girls would marry him 
so long as his money outweighed his vice But, 
now, is Peter so much more vicious and de- 
praved than many of his associates? The 
greatest general of the war was the most ar- 
dent drinker and spreer of the army in his 
younger days; a possible commander in-chief 
of our army once changed all- the numbers of 
a score of rooms at Willard's Hotel and filled 
all the boots in front of the same with water; 
two-thirds of the grave and gray men cf the 
United States Senate continue to fill up daily 
with befuddling booze; and four out every five 
of the best and most* successful men of our 
land have frolicked with John Barleycorn 
during their younger days. There arc those 
who sow their wild oats in dexterous ways. 
Peter is bold and above board. He gets in all 
his quarter sections before everybody and he 
harrows in the seed in ways that amuse and 
surprise. But he is as bright as a dollar and 
liberal to a fault. He is the soul of the club 
and pays for all he gets. He has been edu- 
cated up to a proper standard, and is one of 
the most sociable and entertaining young 
men in general conversation in the state. He 
has never done a mean nor an ignoble act, 
and he has never injured a human being. He 
is a human vocabulary of the rights of man 
and the only woman he has ever loved is his 
mother — and you can't make a young man 
out teetotally bad who thoroughly loves his 
mother. 

Nowi.in Bkos., proprietors of the Broad- 
way Stables, 428 S. Broadway, secured the 
second prize in class 14, at the Horse Show, 
showing roadster team. They won in compe- 
tition against imported stock which shows 
the high grade of excellence of their horses 
and equipment. 




The Crown of the Valley 

Pasadkna, Feb. 10, 1899. 

DEAREST BETTY:— It came like a shock 
to most of us girls that next Wednesday 
is Ash Wednesday and Lent begins. 

Not that it seems to make much difference, 
however, for there are nearly as many invita- 
tions out for social functions the last of the 
week as the first, as there are quite as many 
people in society here who do not observe Lent 
as there are those who do. Years ago nearly 
all the wealth and aristocracy in Pasadena 
was confined to the Episcopal church, but 
times have changed. 

The greatest anticipated gaiety between 
now and Ash Wednesday is the Valentine 
party to be given at the Valley Hunt Club on 
the evening of Shrove Tuesday. It is not a 
club function but is given by a number of the 
younger members of the club — a subscription 
affair. It will, of course, be perfectly lovely 
and will shed a glimmer of reminiscent delight 
down the long vista of forty days of stagna- 
tion and self denial. 

The event of this week occurs tonight and 
is the elaborate at home given by Dr. and 
Mrs. Fenyes introducing Miss Muse into soci- 
ety. It will be one of the most brilliant func- 
tions of the season and several of the girls 
have had brand new gowns to honor the occa- 
sion. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Wilde of Orange Grove 
avenue gave a delightful card party Monday 
evening in honor of their daughter and her 
husband, Mr. and Mrs. Frank G.Coburn. The 
guests were Mrs. Coburn's old friends, now the 
young married set. There were about forty 
present and everyone said it was delighiful, 
talking over old times and discussing the re- 
markable characteristics of their respective 
children most of whom have not had more 
than two or three years in which to distin- 
guish themselves. 

Next Friday afternoon Mrs. Belle M. Jew- 
ell gives a card party to the unmarried friends 
of Mrs. Coburn and a week later will enter- 
tain the married people in her honor. 

The only thing we girls have clone worth 
mentioning is to hive a box party at the Or- 
nheum Wednesday afternoon, but next week 
Mrs. Henry Clay Durand entertains Thursday 
afternoon at heart-* in honor of her niece Miss 
Durand of Chicago. 

Mrs. T. S Up de Graff entertained the San 
Souci Club yesterday afternoon at the Valley 
Hunt Club house and the gathering was said 
to be one of the must delightful in the history 
of the club. The dancing hall, where cards 
were played, was decorated in St. Valentine's 
own color and suggestions of St. Valentine's 
day were carried out in prizes and accessories, 
the lone hand markers being tiny valentines. 

The Altadena people seem to have jolly 
times and a number of social gatherings just 
among themselves. Mrs. G. L. Guyer enter- 
tained the Altadena club at progressive euchre 
Thursday evening. 




8 



Western Graphic 



THE CLUBS OF HAVANA. 

TO THE EDITOR:— Noting what Mr. 
Duque said in your paper last week, 
prompts me to further enlarge upon the club 
life of the people of Havana; for really Ha- 
vana might probably be called a city of clubs. 
These organizations are by far the most im- 
portant social institutions of the town. There 
is scarcely an able-bodied citizen to be found 
who does not enjoy a membership in some 
sort of a Cuban club. The social life of the 
city is restricted so largely by old Spanish 
customs that the club is the only real resort 
left for the men. 

The men flock together at the clubs. The 
greatest of these is the Circulo de Asturianas. 
It has 18,000 members, and occupies a build- 
ing two-thirds as large as Fiesta Park. Of 
course there are other things in this structure, 
including living apartments, a restaurant, a 
big book store, on the shelves of which are 
many worn school books bearing American 
imprints, sold evidently by returned students; 
a theater, and various minor establishments. 
But the club uses the greater part of the upper 
stories, and it is, in its way, a very ably- 
managed organization. The dues are $1.50 
a month, or $18 a year. In return for this 
the member gets all the privileges of the club, 
and, in addition thereto, free medical atten- 
dance. If ill enough to go to the club hospi- 
tal he is conveyed thither and maintained by 
the club without any personal expense. In 
the Cuban climate many of the Asturians fall 
ill, and, as no public provision is made for 
the poor victims of the fever, this club 
arrangement is one of rare humanity. 

The next important club is the Casino 
Espafiol, or the Spanish Club. It possesses a 
club house so magnificent as to excite aston- 
ishment. The building was erected as a pri- 
vate residence of the Count de More, a Cuban 
grandee of the first-class, and he actually 
lived in it. The building covers an entire 
square of ground. Its lofty roof and galleries 
are supported by great columns of stone; 
every floor is of tile, and the court around 
which the triple galleries run would contain 
the Wilcox building. The membership is 
3,000. 

The club maintains in one corner of its 
spacious quarters a free night school where 
languages, such as English and French, and 
the higher branches are taught, as well as the 
more elementary matters. BoyB and men, 
policemen and soldiers from the garrisons can 
be found in its classes. 

A ball at the Spanish Casino is a dream 
of delight. Here come the proud dames, the 
haughty dons, and the pretty sefloritas along 
with their overburdened escorts. T he Cuban 
dance is a sawed -off waltz, or, more definitely 
speaking, a wriggle. Hug the girl tightly, 
shuffle your feet slightly, and vibrate the per- 
son and you are dancing Cuban style. 

Unlike American and English clubs, noth- 
ing like exclusiveness is enforced. The uni- 
formed janitor at the gate welcomes the pass- 
ing stranger to walk in and look around as 
much as he likes. He can even invade pri- 
vate rooms and watch the monte game with 
no other invitation than that of the door- 
keeper. 

The swellest and most fashionable affairs 
come off at the Circulo Militar. This is the 
Spanish military Club, though its member- 
ship includes many officers of the volunteers. 
The most exclusive company congregates in 
its halls and parlors, and the luncheon is re- 



garded with extreme favor by the Havanese 
young men about town. 

There exist, however, many samples of an- 
other kind of club not to be found elsewhere 
in the world. The Cuban youth are denied 
the light of association with their young 
women friends except under the stern eye of 
a duenna. Literally it may be said that the 
Cuban girl is never out of the sight of her 
father or mother or some trusted female com- 
panion. Even in her sleep she is compelled 
to submit to espionage, for her mother or the 
female watcher occupies the same room. If 
she walks or rides abroad the same kind of at- 
tendance prevails. Even the little maidens 
cannot go to school without a woman escort. 
It looks odd to see a little bit of a girl toddling 
along the narrow walks with a solemn old 



The girls are exempt from social restric- 
tions and have a commendable capacity for 
having a pleasant time. The dances and the 
kindred attractions are enjoyed once a week. 
There is but one distinction exercised. The 
octoroons must be of a particular shade of 
lightness. Any complexion darker than a 
drab chocolate is barred. "We are very par- 
ticular about the shade," observed a ieading 
member in one of these clubs to me once. He 
was serious about it, and his solemnity re- 
called an adventure that "Tom" Corwin of 
Ohio used to relate about his own black- 
visaged self and a certain Ohio judge, who 
in his company sought to get admitted to a 
mulatto ball in Cincinnati, but the judge was 
excluded on the ground that "he was jus' a 
shade too dark." 




woman following behind carrying a little red- 
bound slate en route for the Ecole de Ninas. 

Under such restrictions courtship becomes 
a matter of negotiation, and matrimony 
assumes new terrors. The longing for female 
society that is not altogether bad has there- 
fore caused the creation of a novel club sys- 
tem. The pretty octoroon girls, some of whom 
are from New Orleans, some from Mexico, and 
others native, who work in the stripping 
rooms of the cigar factories, lend themselves 
readily to the scheme. Twenty or thirty 
young fellows will join together to form an 
octoroon club. Quarters are secured, facili- 
ties for furnishing refreshments are supplied, 
musicians hired, and the club is created. 
Drinks and cigarettes abound, and there is 
much music and dancing. 



There are dozens of these clubs in Havana. 
It would be hard to call them moral institu- 
tions, and almost equally difficult to call 
them demoralizing. The girls are, as a rule, 
as honest as could be expected. The cause 
and excuse for their existence is found in the 
social condition described. IfBBOUTTO. 



A SKELETON LOVE STORY. 

A MANLY form, noble brow, ingenuous 
features; devoted and true. A willowy 
figure, eyes soft and lambent, and half hidden 
by lashes that emphasize the brightness of the 
orbs they shadow, teeth like a double row of 
pearls, cheeks upon which red follows white 
as the shadow of the summer cloud glides over 
the grassy mead, a voice informed with sweet, 
entrancing music. 



Western Graphic 



Long and silent exchanges of loving 
thoughts, followed by words of affection that 
mantle the cheek of the listener with the glow 
of happiness supreme. 

A clouded brow, lines of anguish, ecstasy 
divine gives place to doubt and distrust; 
averted looks and hasty words; estrangement. 

Tears, heartsickness, misery; dissembling 
smiles and masquerade of careless joy ; coquet- 
ry, sullen visage. 

A last meeting, formal and distant; an ac- 
cidental touch of hands; a sigh, a glance; re- 
crimination; explanations; clouds disperse; 
dearer than ever; "Henry!" "Darling!" "To 
think for a moment!" "How could I?" 

"When shall it be?" Blushes; lips meet 
lips. Rapture! 

Sunshine after the storm, the morning's 



AN EPISODE OF THE SIERRAS 

HY BEN C. TRUMAN 

THERE is a place on the line of the Cen- 
tral Pacific Railroad, about half way, 
say, between Sacramento and the summit of 
the Sierra Nevada mountains, called Auburn, 
in Placer county, California. It is one of the 
most entrancing mountain spots in the world 
so far as rhapsody of atmosphere, healthful- 
ness of situation and majesty of woods are 
concerned. It is the one California spot of all 
others to which persons suffering dreadfully 
from asthma are directed, and thousands have 
found almost instant relief and there have 
been many who have enjoyed permanent 
emancipation from the terrible complaint after 
having returned to their homes. 

Some forty years ago there lived at Auburn 




NG CHARACTERS— At the Burbank next week 



J\g§ ^^^^^©^^^^c^^^^^ 



light following the ebon gloom of night, sad- 
ness turned to joy and misery transformed to 
happiness. 

Stern father; dejection; roses disappear 
from cheeks; eyes downcast; appetite gone; 
lassitude, fading away. 

Mother prays; speaks of their own early 
trials in the courts of love, father inexorable. 
Meets with an accident; lying on his prison 
couch, tenderly nursed by his hollow-eyed, 
wan-cheeked daughter. "Forgive!" 

Relief in tears; reason resumes her throne. 
Her life saved. "Take her; let it be as soon 
as you please." 

Roses return, step gladsome and light. 
Milliners, dressmakers, whirl of excitation. 

Wedding bells; never was a handsomer 
couple. True love at last rewarded. 



two partners, John Smith and John Jones. 
These men had reached the "diggins" in '4!) 
— the former from Maine and the latter from 
Rhode Island. They had mined, milled, mer- 
chandised and farmed, saved and banked to- 
gether. Some thirty years ago they decided 
to go into the Angora wool business. Now, 
Smith was liberal and hospitable, warm- 
hearted and kind. Jones was somewhat the 
reverse, although in no way strictly unkind 
or miserly. These partners had a fine band 
of Angoras, as pretty as could be found any- 
where on the Pacific slope. The winter rains 
had commenced to descend, in 1859, and the 
Angoras would huddle together and wish — if 
they knew how to wish — that they were shorn 
lambs — at least so the man from Maine 



thought, and it moved his heart to pity, and 
he suggested that they build a shed, so that 
the poor animals ro.ight have some shelter 
from the coming pitiless storms. Jones 
laughed at his partner and said: 

"Smith, you're a fool. Pardon me, now, 
old man; but if I were asked to name the 
biggest old idiot in placer I should answer, 
'John Smith from Maine!'" 

" Do I understand by that that you de- 
cline to join me in the building of a shed for 
the protection of our fine goats? " 

"That's the long and short of it, pard." 

" Well I shall build it out of my own 
private funds then," said the sturdy old man 
from Maine. 

"And I have no objections to you doing 
so," responded the brusque Rhode Islander. 

"They are as much God's creatures as we 
are, Mr. Jones." 

" Except that we eat the contents of to- 
mato cans and they masticate the cans, Mr. 
Smith." 

"You're a ruffian! " 

" And you're a fool ! " 

" I know it." 

" Yes; and everybody knows it." 

But Smith went on with the shed, which 
was built big and strong and cost nearly 
$700. And upon the very night of its com- 
pletion there came an ideal Sierra storm. So 
severe was it, indeed, that Jones, before he re- 
tired, had made up his mind to share with 
Smith the expense of the construction of the 
shed. 

" Providence tempted me to erect that 
cover for our Angoras," said Smith to his wife 
just as he put out the light. 

All that night it blew furiously and the 
rain descended in torrents, and there also 
came sleet, snow and hail. 

Still every human being in Auburn was 
happy, including Jones. Smith, however, 
was the happiest person of all. 

But when he looked out of his window 
tke next morning his happiness was imme- 
diately turned to grief; and there came a 
fearful headache to him, and he concluded 
that he was too ill to even go up to the post- 
office that da}'. 

" What is the matter?" cried his wife, as 
her husband once seemed to swoon. 

"Matter enough. And mind you, Sarah, 
don't you dare let Jones into this house today 
under any consideration. If he comes tell 
him I'm too sick to see anyone. Tell him I'm 
out of my head. Tell him anything to get 
rid of him Confound his old soul, tell him 
I'm dead — as dead as " 

" Why, what is the matter? " 

"Matter! Great Caesar's immaculate 
ghost! Matter? Everything is the matter. 
.Jones says I'm the biggest fool in Placer, and 
that I'm a dog-goned old idiot, and Jones is 
right. Jones never lies." 

" Heavens! you are mad. You are a fool, 
and no mistake! " 

" Right you are. Right you are, you dear 
old ninny. But look out of the window. 
Look at the other fools! " 

Mrs. Smith took in the whole thing at a 
glance. The beautiful Angoras were all hud- 
dled shivering together on the roof of the new 
shed which had been built for their protec- 
tion. 

LEGAL BUSINESS 
Wu attend to your letral cases and make no charge 
if not successful. Our specialty is settling cases out 
of court. Hard collections collected. Advice free. 
Correspondence solicited. Langworthy Co., 220 So. 
Spring street, Los Angeles. 



II) 



Western Graphic 




" CLORINDY; OR, THE ORIGIN OF THE CAKE 
WALK." 

LAST summer in New York there was a 
small host of enterprising theatrical 
men who tried to tickle the public's taste and 
get its good money with divers and sundry 
show spectacles. It was a tough season for 
all except one man. 

The one man was E. E. Rice. His con- 



any one of our three theaters at half-past eight 
in the evening will feel like eating his words. 
A friend tried to argue me into the belief that 
hard times made theaters prosperous, but I 
refuse to connect with that idea, and will con- 
tinue to think that when a city spends from 
$5,000 to $8,000 a week on amusements, that 
it is a pretty good indication that in the 
"hardness of our upness" we still live. 



WOMEN'S rights advocates will possibly 
class " A Contented Woman " as an 
optical illusion, an auricular deceit or a pipe 
dream, but it was worth the money just to see 
the women who are cultivating aldermanic 



and made a quaintly pretty picture. Mr. 
Wilson has a pleasing voice, and Miss Leices- 
ter's, while sweet, is decidedly thin, especially 
in duet with her male partner. Then Papinta 
— glorious, beautiful Papinta — danced and 
smiled her way still deeper into my heart, and 
after the magnificent effects of the colored 
lights and the mirrors and the sensuous music, 
she came out into the coarse glare of the 
yellow electric lights, with her masses of 
fluffy lace billowing about her, it was hard to 
believe that she was indeed a woman — a 
charming, splendidly formed woman. A non- 
chalant-looking young man walked onto the 
stage dressed for a rainy afternoon, with ulster 
and umbrella, and the way he juggled those 



FOUR ADVANCE PEEPS AT "CLORINDY," THE GREAT COON SPECTACLE 





" WITH STYLE AND GRACE DIVINE"" 

freres called him " Edward Effervescent Rice." 
Most people have heard of him. His record 
in the theatre business has been a series of 
astounding successes, interspersed with some 
of the most stupendous failures ever known. 
He hits it, as the phrase is, and then has a 
slump. His biggist hit was made last sum- 
mer in putting on at the Casino Roof Garden 
the negro rag time opera, called "Clorindy, or 
the Origin of the Cake Walk." Thirty of the 
most expert cake walkers and sweetest singers 
and all around delineators of the colored 
character were engaged by the effervescent 
Edward and New York fell down and wor- 
shiped — figuratively speaking — at the result. 
It was a great big, overwhelming success. Rice 
made a lot of money out of it, and is at it yet. 
The idea was novel and very well executed. 
Paul Laurence Dunbar, the young negro poet, 
of whom Howells made a protege, composed 
the lyrics and libretto of the spectacle, the 
music being written by Will Marion, who is 
now directing this feature of "Clorindy" dur- 
ing its Pacific coast tour. Some of the most 
popular songs of the day are sung in "Clorin- 
dy," among these being " Who Dat Say Chick- 
en in Dis Crowd." 



countenances squirm under the scathing satire 
of the play. Of course the author has the 
advantage in arranging the situations to suit 
himself, and no one could but sympathize 
with sweet innocent Grace Holme (Miss Belle 
Archer) being led into politics through her 
womanly failing of a too trusting nature. The 
humor in "A Contented Woman" is quiet and 
sparkling. There are none of the uproariously 
funny things that are generally expected in 
Hoyt's plays, nor are the points forced upon 
the audience to the annihilation of the really 
clever story. The vaudeville feature is clean 
and pretty, the company has been exception- 
ally well selected, and the good business of 
the week is additional proof of the old saying 
that merit will win. 



SAU TE VOI R PARTNERS AU." 

"J 

two articles, coins," cigars and his plug hat, 
Aas smooth in the extreme. He calls himself 
Max Cincinati, but whether it was Oshkosh or 
Milpitas, his work is delightfully clever. The 
musical Avolos are a trio of xylophone players 
whose work ranks even with that of Miss 
Western, who was here a few weeks since. The 
finale to William Tell overture was a wonder- 
ful piece of execution. With three good hold- 
overs, the Orpheum bill was worth two of 
Koster & Bial's. 



IT HAS been a week of unalloyed pleasure 
to theater - goers, and the hard-times 
croaker who will peep at the auditorium of 



A FEW days ago I was looking over a 
program of Koster & Bial's vaudeville 
theater, of New York, and being struck with 
the ordinary talent offered, had curiosity to 
find how much people paid to see such a show 
in the effete East. Fifty cents general ad- 
mission, one dollar and a half for an orchestra 
seat ! That same evening I went to the 
Orpheum and saw a two-to-one better show 
for a half a dollar — lees fifty cents. There 
were Ernest Wilson and Marie Leicester, 
dressed as our great-grandparents used to, 
who sang some old songs and some new ones, 



OUITE the jolliest, most delightful even- 
ing of the season was enjoyed by every 
lover of light opera at the Los Angeles Thea- 
tre this week. " The Idol's Eye" and " The 
Wizard of the Nile" are original in libretto 
and score, and clustered around inimitably 
comical Frank Daniel are half a dozen good 
voices, a score of pretty and well drilled 
chorus girls, all appropriately costumed and 
surrounded by unusually attractive stage set- 
tings. Angelenos cannot but be proud to see 
Louis Gottschalk in the directors chair, and 
his handling of a picked up orchestra is ad- 
mirable. 



Burbank.— The Waldorf Company, headed by that 
talented and intelligent young actress. Miss Janet 
Waldorf, will play an engagement at the Burbank 
Theater, commencing Sunday evening. Miss Waldorf 
is an Eastern girl, but has chosen California as the 
best field for the opening of her career, and conse- 
quently the Eastern press refer to her as a California 
girl and refuse to believe that she is not a Western 
product. 

rt "As You Like It" has been chosen for the open- 
ing Sunday night, and will be given the most elabor- 



Western Graphic 



11 



ate production ever seen in this city, with all the 
solos, glees and choruses written for the play. The 
Euterpean Quartette, well known for its excellent 
work, has been especially engaged for the occasion. 
"As You Like It" will be repeated Monday night 
and at the matinee Saturday. " The Hunchback " is 
to be presented Tuesday and Wednesday evenings 
and at the Wednesday matinee. " Twelfth Night " 
will be played Thursday and Friday nights, and "The 
Lady of Lyons" Salurday night. 

Orpheum.— The much-heralded spectacle, " Clor 
indy, or The Origin of the (Jake Walk," is to be pre- 
sented as the Chief feature of the Orpheum's new bill 
next week. It is a modern rag-time opera, for want 
of a better name, and is the fruit of E. E. Rice's fer- 
tile brain. He is known as the most successful and 
original extravaganza director in the country, and he 
alone is responsible for ''Clorindy." Last summer at 
the New York Casino Roof Garden he produced the 
spectacle, employing thirty picked colored expert 
cake walkers, singers and dancers. The lyrics and 
libretto of the musical spectacle were written by Paul 
Laurence Dunbar, the young negro poet and protege 
of William Dean Howells. It is a very pretentious 
turn, for a vaudeville bill, there being with it the 
usual strong and expensive vaudeville features, but 
its success in San Francisco at the Orpheum seems to 
be warrant that the Orpheum management made no 
mistake in importing it to the Coast. The original 
people and scenery will be seen here. The songs in 
"Clorindy" are copyrighted and cannot be used ex- 
cept by the company. Some of these will undoubtedly 
be widely whistled in Los Angeles after Monday 
night, especially " Who Dat Say Chicken in Dis 
Crowd?" Among the cake walkers are Mr. and Mrs. 
Tutt, who won the first prize in the big cake walk at 
Madison Square Garden, New York, two years ago, 
out of 250 couples contesting. 

Giacinta Delia Rocca, a violinist of Europe, and 
said to be superior to any musician of the same branch 
of the art in vaudeville, is to provide the artistic fea- 
ture of the bill. She is young and radiantly beauti- 
ful, according to report. This is her first visit to the 
Coast. 



is Excerpts from II Pagliacci which has hs>d wonder- 
ful success and embraces the Prelude, Intermezzo 
and airs cleverly connected into a concert suite. 

The soloist for this occasion is that very clever 
artist, Miss Anna Virginia Metcalf, who can bo unre- 
servedly congratulated on her excellent work and 
charming manner of expression. Miss Metcalf a 
voice is a pure suprano, rich and sympathetic in qual- 
ity, of wide range and power, and her artistic train- 
ing is manifested in everything she sings. Her 
selection for this program is the Pleurez Aria taken 
from the opera Le Cid, by Jules Massenet. 

The central feature of the program will be Beeth- 
oven's seventh symphony in A major, and is consid- 
ered by the composer himself as one of his best works. 

The last number on the program is the Jubel 
Overture by Weber, which is bright in tone, and 
closes with "God save the King." This number has 
been a favorite concert number ever since it was first 
composed. The sale of reserved seats is now on and 
the indications are that the attendance will be the 
greatest of any Symphony concert yet given by these 
talented musicians. 



Sousa's Band Another grand transcontinental 
tour has been arranged for Sousa and his band for 
the coming season, beiug the fourth extended musi- 
cal pilgrimage of this character undertaken by them 
in six years. Commencing with a week at the Pits- 
burg Exposition early in September, followed by for- 
ty-five days at the St. Louis Exposition, the great 
band will visit every state and territory in the Union, 
playing daily concerts without intermission until the 
first of the following May. John Philip Sousa will 
personally conduct at every concert and his famous 
band will be assisted by two eminent soloists. The 
band will visit this city about the middle of March 
at Simpson Auditorium under the management of J. 
T. Fitzgerald. 

The Chinese New Year commenced on 
Thursday and is still on — and not so very 
still, either. 



LOS ANGELES THKATKR 
f The Most IVrlecl Acoustics of any Building in the City 
Tiii-mlH.v Afternoon, Fab. I4tli, hi :f. l s o'clock 
Sixth Concert of the t-cason M M 9 9i gtTcn by the Loi Angeles 



H.utt l.v Hamilton, 
Director 



Anna YiklimaMhtcalk 
Soprano 



Season Tickets, good for JO admissions with preferred re- 
served seats, $10.00; Single Admission, 2. r >c; Reserved Seats, fiOc. 
Seats now on sale. Tel. Main 70. 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIB8T 
AND SECOND 
Lob Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing Honday, Feb. 13. 

Clorindy. orthe origin of the cake-walk; ISO people. 
Ofaolnta DellH Koccn— Celebrated concert violinist. 
Paplnta the Qlnrinra, the <irand Spectacular Dancer. 
The Musical Aviilcm, World's Greatest Xylophone Players. 
Max Cincinnati, Ku rope's (ireatesl I rick Jugglers. 
Krnest Wilson andf Presenting a Charming Love Story, 
Marie I eiceNter i told in song. 

• I olnmie Carol 1 and / 




Addie Crawford ( 



Clever American Artists 



I3URBANK THEATER 

I ) Main St., In t. Kifth an.: Sixth. Tel. M 1870 

C. A. SHAW, Lessee 
Week Commencing Sunday Kvciiing 

THE YOUNG AMERICAN ACTRESS 

Supported by an excellent company of players. 
Sunday and Monday— "A* You Like It" 
Tuesday and Wednesday— "The II u ncli buck " 
Wednesday Matinee— "1 he Hunchback" 
Thursday and Friday— ' •Twelfth Night" 
Saturday Matinee-"An You Like It" 
Saturday Night— "I.ady of Lyons" 

liurbank Prices - 15, 23, 35, 50, 75, $1. Matinee, 10, 25. 







J 



-if J k • / y 





" READY ALL— AND DOWN THE LINE" 

Papinta will continue a prominent feature. She 
has drawn crowded houses at the nightly perform- 
ances and matinees. Records for receipts are being 
broken at the Orpheum, according to the box office 
oracle, and Papinta is considered responsible. 

The Three Avolos, kings of the xylophone, will 
have a much better position on the bill next week, 
and their fine playing will in consequence be heard 
to much better advantage. New selections will be 
rendered by them. 

Max Cincinati, the wonderful juggler; Wilson and 
Leicester, sweet singers, and Carroll and C awford, 
farce comedy stars, complete the bill. 

Symphony Orchestra— un next Tuesday afternoon 
the Los Angeles Symphony Orchestra will present 
their sixth matinee concert at three o'clock in the 
Los Angeles Theatre. The program is a varied one 
and will probably prove the most interesting one of 
the series yet presented. The opening number is the 
March de Cortege from the Queen of Shebe written 
by Charles Francois Gounod. The secona number 
is from one of the favorite composers of the day, 
Ruggero Leoncavallo, the strongest of the young 
Italian opera school. The selection for this program 



'THE V ERY WARMEST MEMBERS IN THE LAND 

• •••• ,\\i"V. tin' Horse Show 



POPULAR PRICES: 



Although we aim to keep the 
best as well as the medium 
qualities, our prices are al- 
ways interesting to prudent 
buyers. 

DRESS GOODS, HOSIERY. CORSETS, 
SILKS. GLOVES, LINENS, Etc. 

Fixen 3c Co 

135 South Spring and 211 We.t Second 



pictures last 
week was one of Etta Wilks and colts, 
property of Mrs. L. J. H. Hastings. Etta 
Wilks' race record is 2.194 an(l Mr8 - Hastings 
offers all of her stock for sale. 

1 Q^p^^^Q^g^^Q^^^s^^^SS^^) 



Cor. FIRST and 
SPRING STS. 



Cbc palace 

A Select Family lle ort 

Patronized by the iHillrif men of the city with 
their famillcH. Elegantly fitted, cool In Summer 
and warm In Winter. The Berth Family Orchestra In 
attendance Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12 o'clock. Refined music. No Vaudeville 
Baatlllirniit lllld KefrenllliiciitH 
Last car of the evening In every direction and for 
I'aandcna pansea the door. 

■•paolall; Adaptad to 

After Thciiter Partial 

Bernhard &. Schneider, Props. 
" 22 * ^7>V" > ^ — ","> J-r>> ~>J^ m , 



12 



Western Graphic 



A RAINY DAY EPISODE. 

BY ELIZABETH A. VORE. 

THERE are people who wear ten-dollar 
hats on ten cent heads. In this in- 
stance the hat was immaculate. The young 
fellow who supported it was as perfect a speci- 
men of the young English dude ae one often 
finds on American soil. 

He was not dressed for a rainy day, and 
did not even condescend to carry an umhrella, 
for the clouds had lifted and he evidently 
looked to the gods to order the weather for 
the next hour or so for his special benefit. 
But the gods in this progressive land being 
up-to-date and accustomed to all the latest 
improvements, turned a deaf ear to the trust- 
ing representative of John Bull and the big 
drops began to fall with every probability of a 
downpour. 

"Will you share my umbrella?" asked a 
voice at his elbow. Turning hastily, his eyes 
rested upon an humble looking man in 
shabby attire. Fixing a haughty stare upon 
the presumptuous plebian he disdained to 
notice him further. 

"Say boss," cried an audacious street arab 
who had witnessed the occurence, "yerd'd bet- 
ter ?ieze the opportunity, its goin' ter rain 
cats an' dogs, an' that dandy hat o' yourn 
might take cold!" 

He had just reached a crossing and turn- 
ing for an instant, said icily: 

"You young jack-a napes, do you think I 
don't know enough to go in when it rains?" A 
superior smile sat haughtily upon his lips, as 
he continued with great dignit)': "When I 
need a guardian I will hire " 

The sentence was destined never to be fin- 
ished,, the smile froze upon his face; if some 
one had placed a revolver at his head and or- 
dered him to throw up his hands, they could 
not have gone up any quicker than they did; 
their owner, on the contrary, went down, 
measuring his length upon the muddy pave- 
ment. The heartless crowd on the corner 
laughed, as his hat, assisted by the playful 
wind, took a bee-line for the street-car track, 
where it was dropped directly in front of the 
on-coming car. The unfeeling motorman re- 
fused to stop, and the devastating electric car 
swept on, leaving behind it but the ghastly re- 
mains of what had been its owner's pride. 

The fallen unfortunate lost no time in 
assuming a perpendicular position. He had 
scarcely regained his feet when the mischiev- 
ious youngster, whose advice he had scorned, 
approached him, and holding out an absurd 
looking object said with a broad grin: 

"Say, boss, yer hat don't look real healthy, 
fer a fact!" 

The hopeless victim turned abruptly, and, 
hatless and dripping, took a "header" for the 
nearest clothing establishment. 

"If yer should change yer mind about a 
guardeen," shouted the little wretch — but the 
victim was a vanishing point in the distance. 



AS A POET 

THE ".Memoirs" of Florence will show 
that the dead actor, in addition to his 
many other accomplishments, was something 
of a poet. He had been at work upon the 
" Memoirs " for two or three years, and they 
were unfinished at the time of his death, but 
were so far advanced as to make in themselves 
a complete and interesting book. What dis- 
position will be made of the manuscript has 
not yet been decided upon, but the "Mem- 
oirs" are expected to appear before long in 



magazine or book form. The subject matter 
is not confined altogether to the stage, and 
much of the matter is descriptive of Flor- 
ence's life outside theatrical matters. 

In this way many of his own literary 
compositions are introduced. One of the 
prettiest of the poems of which he was the 
author was written at his home in Pasadena, 
Cal., on Christmas, 1886. It is as follows: 

I've journeyed East, I've journeyed West, 
And fair Italy's fields I've seen; 

But I declare 

None can compare 
With thee, my rose-crowned Pasadene. 

Byron sang of Grecian isles. 
Moore extolled his Erin green; 
Were they alive. 
How each would strive 
To paint thy glories, Pasadene. 

I used to think old Venice grand, 
And loved the Adriatic's queen; 

Monaco, too, 

Before I knew 
Thy orange groves, dear Pasadene. 

They boast of wine grown on the Rhine, 
And Chartreuse, both pale and green; 
But I can tell 
Of Zinfandel 
From thy sweet vale, fair Pasadene. 

Flowers rare perfume the air; 
Geranium, fuschia and verbene 

And mignonette 

And violet 
Bedeck thy bowers, Pasadene. 

Florence was a man of wide sympathies, 
whose life was not by any means confined to 
the jovial paths by which he was so wel 
known to the general public. He had close 
family ties and was profoundly impressed by 
the death of his sister Winnie, upon which 
occasion he wrote the following lines: 
Tonight I sit with heavy heart 

And tear wet eyes alone, 
And humbly beg of God to keep 

My sister near His thr »ne. 
To Him I pray, oh. weary day. 
May Thy great will be done. 

Oh, Virgin meek, whose holy cheek 

Was wet with tears of pain 
When on the cross thy Son divine 

Was by his captors slain — 
Oh, pity me and ease my heart. 

Oh, give me peace again. 

Teach me to bow with lowly head 

To thy divine command; 
That when I'm called from sorrow's bed 

I'll sit at thy right hand. 
Oh, God of love, give joy and peace 

With Thy redeeming light. 

Oh, raise the lowly, help the weak. 

With gleams of hope tonight. 
So prays this stricken, bruised heart 

That mourns a sister gone, 
As bowed with sorrow's heavy load 

I sit and weep alone. — W. J F. 

St. Louis, Jan. 1". 1890. 



THE PARIS EXPOSITION 

THE State Department of the United 
States has concluded its list of appoint- 
ments of officers and employes at the Paris 
Exposition, and the list is as follows. It will 
be seen that Mr. Peck's city, Chicago, has not 
been forgotten: 

Officers — F. W. Peck, commissioner-general, 
Chicago; B. D. Woodward, assistant commis- 
sioner-general, Paris; Frederick Brackett, sec- 
retary, New York. 

Experts — Paul Blackman, Chicago; Fran- 
cis E. Drake, Chicago; Frederick J. V. Skiff, 
Chicago; Alexander S. Capehart, New York; 
John H. McGibbons, Chicago; John Getz, 
New York; Richard Waterman, Jr., Chicago; 
George Morin Goustiaux, Paris; Robert J. 
Thompson, Chicago; Willard A. Smith, Chi- 
cago; Charles Richard Dodge, Washington; 
Louis M. Howland, New York; John B. Cast- 
»vell, New York. 

Clerks — Chaille Long, Paris; Casper Crow- 
ninshield, Paris; Lester B. Fulton, Paris; 
John A. Gurd, Paris; W. A. C. Neal, Paris; 
George Pungalo, Chicago; J. M. Allen, Chi- 
cago; Frank W. Moulton, Chicago; Edward 
S. Hoch, Chicago; William M. Handv, Chi- 
cago; Walter L. Eulass, Chicago; Elizabeth 



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send their sons. Mailed free upon application. 

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Line, Westlake Park. 

C. C. Emery, A. M., Principal, 

Walter B. Wheat Ma ager 




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Detective 
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FURNITURE ash CARPETS j 




WHEEL CHAIRS a 

Sold or Rented specialty 



Second Hand Goods Bought, Sold 
or Exchanged 
I. T. MARTIN, 531-533 So. Spring St. 



12 SHAVE TICKET $1,00 




HAIRCUT 15C ^ 

SHAVE 10C vl/ 
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Blue from 
Barber Shop I 

Harry Woods, Fro,, $ 

503 West Sixth St. 

LOS ANGELES * 



CITY STEAM 

Carpet Gleaning 

WORKS. 

Laying, Bordering 
and HefUting Car- 
pets, Furniture Pack- 
ing, Repairing & Up-, 
holstermg. Tel.M.427. 
JOHN BX.OESBB 
Office, 456 S. Broadway 



flFAFNFSS The Auraphone^n ^ffSLSSS 

ULnl I1LUU of any one not born deaf. Invisible in the 
Ear, causing no discomfort. It is to the Ear what glasses are to 
the Eye. Send for pamphlet, mailed FREE. Tells how to re- 
store lost hearing, prevent dealness, and enable ati> p II n T fl 
ODe to bear the faintest sound. ADD! li II HI II 

V. F. FLM-AY, 529 Ellis St.. San Francisco" u 11 u " 




Western Graphic 



13 



M. Cahill, Chicago; Edward J. MacMillan, 
Chicago; William B. Getty, Chicago; Carrie 
V. B. Parker, Chicago; George A. Sweet, Chi- 
cago; Thomas A. Joyce, Chicago; Elsie Rea- 
soner, Chicago; Waller R Talbot, Chicago; 
Minnie Bronson, Chicago; Morris Lewis, Chi- 
cago; Josephine Lucas, Chicago; James B. 
Hayden, Chicago; E. P. Sheldon, New York; 
Frances B. Duno, New York. 

Messengers — John Kelly, Roy B. Taher, 
Chicago; Daniel Hill, New York. 

Pages — William J. Stubbs and Charles 
Humphreys, Chicago. 

Janitor, Eugene Canu, Paris. 

A CITY OF SALT. 

THERE is a city built of salt in Austria 
so large that it would take three weeks 
to visit its ever)' portion. Men have worked 
in its hollows for centuries. It is in the cen- 
ter of the Gallacian salt industry. For 1,000 
years the workers of the salt mines have been 
busy turning this underground city into a 
dream of ballrooms, chapels, altars, restaur- 
ants, railways, chandeliers, staircases and 
pillars The length of the city is nearly three 
miles. 

Visitors to the salt city can descend by a 
sloping staircase or an elevator. The ball- 



room in which the visitor finds himself is im- 
mense, with solid mural decorations, galleries 
and stalwart pillars, as well as shining chan- 
deliers. Since 1750, when it was dedicated, it 
has witnessed many memorable scenes. On 
one end of the room a colossal Austrian eagle 
is painted on the slabs of salt. 

St. Anthony's chapel, next the ballroom, 
has been the resort of thopsands of the faith- 
ful since it was built in ]<;<)s Heatifully 
carved shrines ornament the room. 

Descending from the first floor to the next 
the visitor is fascinated by the beautiful sight 
of the giant chamber "Michalowice," finished 
in 1761, after forty years of labor. It is 59 
feet long, 92 broad and 118 high — the roof 
supported by wooden frame work to avoid dis- 
aster. A salt chandelier of 300 lights gleams 
in the center. 

The third floor of the salt mine contains 
the restaurant and railway station. Twenty- 
five miles of railway from all parts of the 
mine join here, and the buffet is well patron- 
ized by the thousands of visitors. 

Cream, Cheese, Butter, Eggs,, Poultry. 
It is one of tne most convenient things in house- 
keeping to have these staples delivered fresh to your 
kitchen when you want them. T. Page Reeve, 548 
South Spring St. 



A DISTINGUISHED ENGAGEMENT. 

A WASHINGTON dispatch of the 24th 
says: A marriage engagement of more 
than ordinary interest is that of Miss Marie 
McKenna, the second daughter of Justice 
McKenna, tc Richard Kerens Jr., of St. Louis. 
The authority for the announcement is Col- 
onel "Dick" Kerens himself. The wedding 
will undoubtedly be one of the fashionable 
events of Easter and will take place in Wash- 
ington. Miss Marie McKenna made her 
debut last season. 

This marriage will serve further to cement 
he connection between Justice McKenna's 
family and that of Colonel Kerens, as it will 
be remembered that the latter's daughter, Miss 
(Catherine Kerens, married the former's son, 
Mr. Frank McKenna. Their wedding was one 
of the leading events in St. Louis in the early 
winter. 

NEW STOCK CONSTANTLY ARRIVING 




HAWLFV KING & CO., 



Cor. Broadway 

and Fifth Street 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE L- A. Sulphur SpringsT^S 

_ _ . - _ ~% • ^W^-Cor. Macv and Lvnn Stn mH Ufii 



Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic | These Baths are recommended by thSir'SSTthe'lTOrf 

guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 6 Kidney and Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections, 

returu for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when $ . nmt ,„^„™ _ 

you trade with these advertisers. | A ' P ™SEGUR, Propr.etor MRS. L. LARIEUX, Manageress 



Bakery 

i r a nun i r* nn/rnu 

LEADVILLE BAKERY 

W. H Mayo, formerly at 820 W. Pico St., has re- 
moved to646 S. Spring St. If not convenient 
for you to call ou us at our now place, 'please 
leave your street and number so our wagon 
can stop at your home. 


Dental Parlors 

DR. FRANK STEVENS 

Open Evenings and Sundays. Electric light 

used evenings. Tel. Green 93 
3245 South Spring St. - - LosAngei.es 


Electrical Contractors 
WOODILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 
Electrical Supplies and Heating Appliances. We 
1 give special attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 10S W. Third St. 

Telephone Main 112."). 


Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa'e mas- 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair 
(foods of all kinds Thy ("heme de Acacia 
Skin food. 224-220 W. Second St. 


Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Make tine halftones, line cuts, embossing plates 
newspaper cuts— just any hiug you want en- 
graved. See them at the Times Building, Los 
Angeles. 


Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

327 So. Spring St are selling the old reliable 
Hoffman and have added the Tribune (blue 
streak) to tbeir lino. Wheels from $25 00 up. 


Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULEY 

Bookbinder ami Blank Rook Maker Magazine-. 
Music and Rooks of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115>£ N. Main St., Los ANGELES 


Grillework 

JNO. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic, 
707 S. Broadway. 


Kodak Supplies 

F. L DUNGAN 

The most complete Stock In Southern Califor 
nia. First-cia^s Developing and Finishing our 
Specialty. 307 W. Foi rtii St., near Broadway. 


Boots and Shoes 

H.C. BLANEY 

Boots and Shoes for Ladies, Gents. Mis=es, Boys, 
Children, and Infants. Prices reasonable. 

352 S. Spring St. Los Anoei.es 


Real Estate 

" Mayne finds the bargains " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading Keal Kstate Agents 

118 West Fourth St. - - LOS ANGELES 


Business College] 

'2i(> So. Spring St., Los Angeles, Oal. In session 
all the year, students enter any day. 




School of Shorthand 

The Great Shorthand Revolution 

Gregg's Light Line Shorthand 

Principles acquired In ten easy lessons. Students 
write 60 to 80 words a minute with live weeks' 
instruction. Institute 340% S Rroadwav. 


Carpet Cleaning 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax. 
minster, Moqiiette Carpets, Fine Rugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpels taken up, cleaned 
and laid, fijl South Broadway. Phone M. 217 

Bobt. Jordan 


Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Phvsiciau and Surgeon. Specialist for women 
Office hours : 9 to 12 M. 2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 

~>40>4 S. Spring St. - - Los Anoei.es I 


Dancing School 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL 

For Dancing 
The Glide system. A class will organize for be- 
ginners Wed. eve. Jan. 25. Residence 1022 8. 
Bonnie Bra?. Academv Sixth and liroailwav, 
IlliriTO Hall, Los Angel* Tel. Green 1291 


Trusses 

W. W. SWEENEY 

Expert maker and filter of Trusses, Haslie Hos- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. i he only 
manufacturer in 8. Ctlifornii. Rtmember the 1 
number, 313 S. Spring St. Under Ramona 
Hotel. 


Dermatologist 

JOSEPHINE RODDON 

Shampooing and scalp treatment Bust and 
neck development a specialty. Medicated 
baths. Facial treatment. Agent for Mrs. Nettie 
Harrison's goods. 321 West FOURTH ST. 


Undertakers 

BRESEE BROTHERS CO. 

Funeral Directors. Broadway and Sixth Sts. I 
Private Ambulance. Lady Assistant. The best , 
service and the lowest prices. , 

Tel. Main 243 - - - Los Angi i.es | 



Oldest and Largest Bank in Southern 
California 



OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) 8500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,74: 



Total 11,426.742 

OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

8. HEIMANN Assistant Cashier 



DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry C. E. Thom A. Glassell 

O. W. Childs I. W. Hell man, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 

J. F. Francis II W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 



*S-Speclal Collection Department. Our safety 
deposit department offers to the public', safes for 
rent in its uew fire and burglar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 



Druggist 



W. W. BOSWELL 



Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Toilet Articles, 
Pancy Goods, Skins, Sponges, Brushes, Combs, 
Perfumery, Physicians' Prescriptions carelully 
compounded. Tel. G 1372. Fourth and Hill. 



Wood-Carpet 

JNO. A. SMITH 

$1.25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet ' 
Floors, Strip Moors, etc. Can be laid equally 
well in new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 S. Broadway. | 



Main Street Savings M 

Junction of Main, Soring and Temple Sts. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

APITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. prjQTJB President 

L N. VAN NUYS V.ce-President 

B. V. DUQUE Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Rasper Cohn, H. 
W. O'Melvcny, J. B. Lankershlm, O. T. Johnson, 
T. L. Duqiie, I. N. Van Nuys, W. (i. KerckhofT, A. 
Haas. 

Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed Interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests In Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from $ 10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment on mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



NOT1CK OF FORECLOSURE SALdE 

Sheriffs Sale, No. 31,963. 
Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation), plain till', vs. Lizzie M. I alton 
defendant. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale 
Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 20th day or January, 
A.D., 1*19, in the above entitled action, where- 
in Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation) the above named plaintlfl, 
obtained a judgment and decree of foreclosure 
and sale against Lizzie M. Dalton, defendant on 
the lfith day of January. A. D. L8S8, for the sum of 
Three Hundred mid Fortv-three & 10-100 ($3-13 hi) 
Dollars, lawful money "of the United States, 
which said decree was, 011 the 20th day ol 
January, A. D 1899, recorded In Judgment 
Book 82 of said Court, at page 12. I am com- 
manded to sell all ihe certain lot. piece or 
parcel of land situate, lying and being iu'the 
countv of Los Angeles, state of California and 
bounded and described as follows 

Lot Number One (1), Block "A" of the Ninth 
Street Tract Extension, as per map recorded in 
Book 6. r >, pages 89 an.] On of Miscellaneous Rec- 
ords of said county of Los Angeles, together 
with the tenements, hereditaments and appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging, or in any wise ap- 
pertalning. 

Public notice is hereby given that on Tuesday 
the 11th day of February, A. 1). 1899. at 12 o'clock 
U of that day, In front of the Court House doot 

of thee tyof Los Angeles, lir.ui.lunv entrance 

I will. In obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with Interest 
and cost', etc., to the highest and best bidder 
for cash lawful money of the U. 8. 

Dated this 20th day'of January, 1899. 

W. A. IIAM.M KL, 

„ SherifTof I>os Angeles Countv 

By JOHN R. SLATF.H Deputy Sheriff. 

Miller .V Brown, Attorneys for Plaintiff 



the Rosslyn 



Main Street opp Post Office 

The finest equipped Hotel at Moderate 
rates in 

LOS ANGELKS 

140 Klegant Rooms— with steam heat, 
telephones, hot and cold running water, 
and light and air in every room. 

Klectric Klevator, Continuous service. 
70 sunny suits with private baths. Super- 
ior dining room service. 

Ratal American Plan M to 91 pet day 

ICiiI. h KiiKipi an Plan Ml per day up 



Klectric cars to depots and all points of Interest 
Public and Private Parlors Orchestra music 
during dinner hours 

A UN Kit L. RONS, Prop. 



1 1 



Western Graphic 





Western Graphic 



L5 



FINEST BARBER SHOP SOUTH OF VAN NUTS HOTEL IN CONNECTION 

Plain ED /V ™|™ LJ Medicated 

Electric DM I HO Vapor 

From 15 cts to 5o cts F. J. MOLL, JR., Proprietor 

Ladies private entrance on Wall street 252 EAST FIFTH ST 



HUMHEL BROS. & CO. 



TELEPHONE 

MAIN 509 



Employment Agents 



Basement California 
Bank Building 

Carefully selected help of all kinds promptly furnished 
Strictly reliable and largest agency on Pacific coast 



300 West Second St. E 



;or. 
Broadway 




| Los Angeles 
| Pipe Organ Co. 

^ Build e 8 of 

Church 
..Concert.. 

And 

| Parlor Pipe Organs 

Factory: 
8th and San Pedro Sts. 
Los Angeles Tel. Green 1633 



R 

I hi- It. < i. in nl 

Henry Wllhelin - 



Pneumatic Electro Pneumatic _ 
Action and Pueumatic Couplers ? 
our Specialty. Organs 
rebuilt by the latest sys- 
tems. Special specifica- 
tions furnished on short 
notice. Organs taken care of 
by yearly contract. Piano 
and Organ tuning and 
repairing 



JOSEPH MAIER 

President and Treas 



Home 
Industry 

MAIER & 
ZOBELEIN 



444 ALISO STREET 



QEORUti ZOBELEIN 

Vice-Pres. and Secy 

Keep Money 
at Home 




TEL. 91 



LOS ANGELES, CAL 



LOS ANGELES 

Assay OlliCG and Mlnino kxGiianoe 

C. C. DEAN, MANAGER 

Assaying a Specialty Low Rates and Accuracy 
MINES EXAMINED AND SAMPLED 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



149 NORTH MAIN St. 

Kooms "> and 6 



Rave \ou bad Your ljX\X\XCX Suit ? 



"low 



ONE OF KELLfl/W'S 

Business 
Suits 

108 West 2nd St. 



$15.00 




^^^^^^ 

. our Wines flre unexcelled 

They are selected from the finest Sonoma Valley and Southern California 
, Vlnt Q^ S - prices n]ake them w i t hin the reach of every purse. A trial will 
convince you. 

! Old Sonoma Claret...^ 35c gal I Wines in bottles, the 50c kind. 

Old 8onomaZinfand<rfvery fine 40c B al per bottle, .5c 

5-year-old Port 50c gal Good Wh.bky in bulk $190 gal 

5 " Sherry, Angelica & Muscat, 65c gal I Quart Bottle of Fine Whisky 75c 

All other goods in proportion. 
We carry a full line of FINE LIQUEURS 
Eastern shipments a specialty. 



HI 



397-399 S. Los Angeles St. 



4 



Tel. M. 919 
No bar in con- 
nection 
Free Delivery 



The Very Latest 

Wall Papers 

Three Carloads 



$ Simon Maier! 



Walter Bros. 



i 

^ n , n , ^ 149-151-153 N. Spring Street f 

Creamery building, ^ f^^^^^^^^^^^^f 



627 SO. SPRING STREET 
Tel. Main 1055 



Wholesale 
Butcher and 
Packer 

Telephone Main 155 



A NEW DEPARTURE 

IN CREAMERY CONSTRUCTION 

Write us for particulars.... 

Separators, Vats, Churns, or 

Anything you need 

To Make Butter or Chees 
Spend one stamp on us. 

F. M. WILSON & GO. 

Selma, Clark Co., Ohio. 



Patents 



Copyrights 
Hade Marks 
Labels 



TOWNSEND BROS. 

Tel. Mniii 347 :»2i-3!44 Patomac Bloeh 
Broad way 
I. or Angeles, Cal. 



Nice Dry 
Oak and 
Juniper • 



WOOD! 



Also COAL Delivered • 

Black Diamond - - *10.00 • 

Wellington - - »10..".o 9 

Special Prices by the Carload • 




"Our folks are not 
a bit afraid of 

POISON OAK 

or any skin disease. 
One 25 cent box 01 
the riexican Remedy 
knocks it in one 
night " You can 
buy it of your drug- 
gist, or send to the 

Mexican Botanical Co. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



W. E. CLARK 

1248 SO. FIGUEROA 

Tel. West 69 



The Spring of 99" Edition of Western 
Graphic will be an elaborate affair never 
before equalled in the United States. Cal- 
ifornia will be proud of the issue 



Wanamaker & Brown (Philadelphia) 

Titchner & JaCObi (Rochester, 

JYIade to JVIeasure Suits,!? 

Every mote and fuzzis wool | 
Wool and only wool 
Every thread wool J 

Agency 32.5 South Broadway 

Call and see us or drop us a postal card and we will send you samples or 
call upon you. Opkn Saturday evenings. 

JEFFERY & JEFFERY, Agents., 325 So. Broadway 



$10.- 



free 

Delivery 



California 
Limited... 



Santa Fe 
Route 



TH6 Fastest Regular Train Ever Run flGross the Continent 



HAVE YOU NOTICED THE SCHEDULE? 

Leaves Los An Kelt's 1.20 p.m. Mon. Wed. Sat. 
Arrive Denver - - 5 00 p.m. Wed. Frl. Mon. 
Arrives Kansas City - 9.10 p.m. Wed Frl. Mon. Arrives St. Paul - 
Arrives ( hlcago - - 9.62 a.m. Thurn. Sat. Tues Arrives New York 



CONNECTING TKAINB 
Arrives Omaha - • fi.OO a.m. Thnr. Sat. Tiles. 

7.00 a.m. Thur. Sat. Tiles. 
8.00 a.m. Thur. Sat. Tuca. 
" 00 p.m. Thur. Sat. Tucs. 
I.:t0 p.m. Frl. Hun. Wed. 
:i.00 p.m. Frl. Sun. Wed. 



Arrives St. , 'lis 
Arrives Fort W 'h 



Arrives Boston 



The California Limited is made up of the highest class of equipment. Is lighted by electricity 
and curries composite and ol.se. v« t ion cars with every accommodation for ladies and gentlemen. 
The Dining Car gives une.i.ialc.l service. 

This splenoid train is for first-class travel only, but there is no extra charge beyond the rcgu 
lar ticket and sleeping car rate an.' is in addition to the regular Dally Overland BxpreM 
which carries both Pullman Palace and tourist cars through to ( hlcago. 



II. K. CKEUORY. Asst (ien'l Passenger Ant 
S. C. and S. Fc, P. roads, I-os Angeles. 



JNO. J. HYKN K, (ien'l Passenger Agt. 
8. C and 8. Fe P. roads, Los Angeles 



HOTEL RflMONfl 

Los Angeles, 



Cal. 



Most Centrally Located. Klntt-cbiss .it Modern Rate* 

Cor. Spring and Third Strcels 

.F. B. MALLORY, Prop. 




THE ISLAND OF PA NAY. 



The Principal city of the Island and next in size and importance to 
Manila is Iloilo Gen. Otis has received orders to take the city, which 
he will proceed to do on the American plan. 



McCALL'S Patterns are Good 




Are You Going Away? 

We have every kind of a Traveler's Hand Bag which is desir- 
able. We sell them at Dry Goods profits, "on the one price to 
all" plan. We handle only such goods as can be recommended 
as first-class. 

Dress Suit Cases, Irish linen covered, good strong frames, 
alligator leather corners and handle, brass trimmed, 22 inch size 
.$3.50, 24 inch size $4.00. 

Dress Suit Cases, covered with oak-tanned vici kid, lined with 
strong Irish linen canvas, double tough leather corners, brass 
trimmed and Yale back, 22 inch size $6.50, 24 inch size $7.00. 

Handbags, imitation alligator leather, brass trimmed, 13 inch 
size at $1 25. 

Genuine French Grain Calf Hand Bags, steel frame, nickle 
trimmed, 12 inch size $1.75, 13 inch size $2.00, 14 inch size $2.25, 
15 inch size $2.50. 

317-325 SOUTH BROADWAY 

Between Third and Fourth Street 



Semiannual Discount Sale 



/^UR Sixteenth Semi-Ann ual Discount Call 
♦♦^^ now being held, bids fair to eclipse all for- 
mer efforts; as -ve have in stock many lots of elegant 
goods intended for our Holiday trade which arrived too 
late, these lines, as well as all other articles in our 
store, are marked down to prices that will be a delight- 
ful surprise so the ladies of this section. 

Don't fail to Attend this Sale 



H. F. VOLLMER & CO. ^IMPORTERS 

116 South Spring Street. 

IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 




"It looks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

m 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 



Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & M0FFITT 



WENDELL EASTON 
President 



GEORGE EASTON 

Vice-President 



GEO. D. EASTON 

Secretary 



ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK 
Treasurer 



WMiiOKWGttC 



Be up to date and invest your money where it will bring quick 
returns. Invest in the most attractive part of the city, the 

MENLO PARK TRACT 

Large Lots. Streets Improved. Two Oar Lines, but twelve minutes 
from business center. Nobby homes building in every block. 

It will pay you to call on us. 

EASTON ELDRIDGE & Co. 



121 SOUTH BROADWAV 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Press of leo. Bice & Sons (Inc..) 311 313 New Higb Street 



Western Graphic 



gpS ILLUSTRATED WEEKLY JOURNAL 



Los Angeles, Saturday, February 18, 1899. 



Edition de 

In Cents a 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

"PAPINTA." 





The stage — it was shadowed as if by a storm, 

A spell of deep mystery bound it. 
When out of the night flashed a fairy like form, 

With a million bright rainbows around it! 
A million bright rainbows that circled the dark — 

Red roses of May time in winter 
Seemed falling in showers!*** The music! and hark! 

'Tis Papinta! "Papinta! "Papinta! 



This way she danced — 
That way she danced, 

And 7vhcre her twinkling footstep glanced 
The soul of music seemed entranced — 

And rosy May met winter; 
And at the falling of her feet 
A chorus chimed in music sweet 

' 'Papinta"— still ' 'Papinta! ' ' 






But which of the ladies who daticed with delight, 

With the rainbows of mystery round her, 
Was Papinta ? Tor twelve met the music that night, 

In the storm of the roses that crowned her! 
Twelve faces that beamed in the glory that streamed 

Frow the magical Mayday in winter, 
When soft in the gloiv that had dazzled them so 

They followed the steps of Papinta. 



This 7vay she danced — 
7 hat way she danced, 

And where her twinkling footsteps glanced 
The soul of music seemed entranced — 

And rosy May met winter; 
And still that chorus chiming siceet 
I /trough all the mazes of her feet: 

'"Papinta"— stilt '"Papinta!" 



2 



Western Graphic 



CALIFORNIA TABLE WINES 

The popularity of our GOLD MEDAL WINKS can be accounted for from the fact 
that they are the products of our own Vineyards and are guaranteed PURE, OLD 

and wholesome. We sell no wines 
under five years old. 



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PORT 
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50° 



Per Gal. 



Older Wi ies at Proportionate Prices 



Spetial Otter 



TO EASTERN 
VISITORS 




We deliver free ol freight to your R.R. Station 



$ 7.75 
9.00 



2 Cases Assorted Wines, XX 
Or 2 " " " XXX 

Including one bottle Brandy. 
Or 2 Cases Assorted Wines, XXXX - 1 1 - 00 

Including two bottles 1888 Brandy and one bottle Champagne. 

Southern California Wine Company 

Tel. Main. 332. 220 W. Fourth St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Ladies' Shoes 
For Spring 

Is quite as extensive and 
fully as complete as any in 
the city- We carry all kinds 
of Good Shoes ranging in 
price from $2.50 to $6.00. jt jt, j. u * 

innes-GriDDen Shoe Go. 

258 So. Broadway 



m 

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Sole Agents for Ihtr Jcnncss Miller 
Hvgtnu Shoes for Ladies. 



231 W. Third St. A 

* 



.•^•^v ^SP^SF^S ^? 



Pictures, Frames and Artists' 
For 30 DayS- 



Matcrials at a Big Sacrifice. 

In accordance with our usual custom, we are In the 
"midst of our Great Clearance Sale for the purpose of 
CLOSING OUT all surplus stock and short and broken lines. We do this in order to 
make room for spring goods. Regular prices completely upset. You can SAVE ">o 
HER CENT, now on some things. Liberal discounts on every article in stock. 

Twenty per cent, is what you can save on PICTURE 
FRAMES now at Liehtenberger's Gi eat Clearance Sale- 
Have your Pictures Framed to order while this oppor- 
tunity lasts 



4g- ^ jg; afl sfi ^ -g- <: afi '*£z£i <*2^<*.- £ ^^^•X 
/ii 1 ^Jy 



20 per cent 
Saved .... 



1 1 mm 



GREAT ANNUAL 



C LEAR ANCE S ALE 

We Offer Some Great Values for Monday. Remember a Chance Like 
This Comes but Once a Year. 

On Picture Easels 50 per cent. On Framed Pictures 25 per cent. 

On Stock Frames 33 J-3 per cent. On Frames to Order 20 per cent. 

On Art Materials 10 percent. 



f 

t 
it 

f 



/IS 
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I Cowe 
* Railway 



H. C. Lichtenberger | 



ART EMPORIUM 



m 

V 202 South Spring St. Wilcox Building. | 



/IS 

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Magntfcent 
Panorama of 
Earth and Ocean 



Grandest Trip 
on Earth 



Gcho JVIountain Rouse 

SITUATED on the summit of Echo Mountain, 
3300 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartments 
with or without baths ( uisine unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

Special 

Guests remaining one week or longer will be al- 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fare 
to Echo Mountain and return and a 50c round trip 
rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily if 
desired. 

Tickets and full informalion 
CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Trarnv ami Excursion Agent 
214 South Spring St. - - Los Angeles Cal. 
Tel. Main 960 



/♦s 

/IS 
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Tufts' Electric Works * 



<X^] SUCCESSOR TO £><> 

PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 

701 South Main Street 



Blectrical ltepairin<r 

Armature Winding 

Motors, Dynamos, 

and Switchboard. 

Appara tus 

First=Class Machine Work 



Telephone 
Main 1570 



JOHN Q. TUFTS, Jr. 

Proprietor. 



FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 



Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 

311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Entered at the postoffice in Los Angeles as second-class mail matter. 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. Single 
Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe, Per Copy Ten Cents. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

We Solicit Contributions of Short Stories and Articles of Interest about Southern 
California, which we will pay (or at our regular rates The usual 
rules regarding Anonymous Contributions and 
Rejected Mss. will be observed. 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VI. 
Number 7. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, February 18, 1899. 



Udltion de Luxe 
lo Cents a Copy 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc. 



BEN. C. TRUMAN 



AMONG the engravings in the " Munsey " 
of February is one of Governor Gage ; 
and, while it is an exceedingly good picture of 
our Henry, it gives him that tired look of 
mingled astonishment and skepticism that I 
have never seen, but apprehend came over his 
generally radiant countenance when apprized 
of the returns from San Diego county. 

Good news still continues to come from the 
Philippines, and now nearly all the important 
cities and other salient points are in American 
possession. The Army and Navy have got 
along wonderfully well away out there, beyond 
the Algers and the Corbins and the Eagans, 
and their accomplishments have been clean 
and direct and thrilling, and no embalmments 
of beef, of character or of discipline have cut 
any ice thereabouts. 



time for him to retire from the contest. We 
say all this seriously and respectfully, and 
without any allusion to Mr. Grant as being 
the son of his father — which is neither here 
nor there, except that the son may feel truly 
proud — nor of his being a carpet-bagger, 
which is not true. Indeed, as a citizen of San 
Diego, he has done much for that place; and, 
had he not traded off the head of his ticket to 
further his own political preferment, he would 
have been the'most desirable candidate in the 
State, and in time undoubtedly would have 
secured the nomination and election. But he 
has seemingly committed political hari-kari 
and is beyond the power of resuscitation. 



The movement to make General Joe 
Wheeler a major general in the regular army 
should pass Congress without a dissenting 
vote, partly because one or more officers of 
that rank are needed, and partly because 
Wheeler is a great fighter and the most popu- 
lar officer in our army to-day. He seems to 
have got into the hearts of the American peo- 
ple alongside of Dewey, and the whole Nation 
wants the Government to crown these two with 
imperishable laurels. 

It should dawn upon Mr. Grant and his 
manager, and the members who are persist- 
ently voting for him for Senator, that they are 
all occupying an unwholesome position, 
partly because their methods have been repre- 
hensible from the first, and partly because 
their culpability has been found out and that 
their further candidacy should be declared off. 
There has seemingly been no strictly honest 
politics in Grant or his managers since they 
commenced spending money for the Legislative 
portion of the ticket, to the detriment of other 
portions thereof, and trading votes which 
largely benefited Maguire. Their not uncons- 
cious repudiation of the head of the ticket in 
order to obtain Legislative votes for Grant 
would have cost Mr. Gage— who was working 
"tooth and toe nail" for the whole ticket — his 
election, had the contest been so closely nar- 
nowed as between Budd and Estee and Bart- 
lett and Swift. Besides, there are men of much 
more intellectual force and power than Grant 
all over the State, who has no conspicuous 
qualities of statesmanship whatever. His 
willingness to sacrifice the head of the ticket 
to promote his own interests, and the bungling 
manner he has put his $30,000 where he 
thought it would do the most good to him, 
should admonish candidate k Grant that it is 



That offensive creature of Utah (with three 
wives) who proposes to take a seat in Congress 
given him by Mormon voters, should be sat 
down upon by that body when the polygamous 
wretch makes his appearance with his insig- 
nificant harem. Mormonism is mainly com- 
posed of the riff-raff of Europe, but the senti- 
ment dominates Utah, notwithstanding the 
Edmunds Bill and the promise of Utah repre- 
sentatives to frown away the evil in case of 
Utah's admission as a State. There is no 
licentiousness existing in America so gross 
and repulsive as polygamous Mormonism, and 
it is as damnable as it is licentious, because 
its adherents gild over its nastiness and re- 
pulsiveness with a pretence of religion. As 
well might murder be set up, as among the 
Thugs of India, as a religious rite. This 
libidinous Mormon who dares go to Congress 
is a law-breaker of the most hideous kind, and 
should not be allowed to take his seat. Our 
civilization is dead against polygamy, and 
Congress dare not defy civilization. Tens of 
thousands of women from all over our fair 
land are beseeching the Congress-elect to ex- 
clude this dirty dog from their membership, 
and these good women will succeed in their 
commendable purpose — at least they should. 



There are three extremely old and wise 
men in the United States Senate whose com- 
bined ages are incalculable — we refer to George 
Frisbie Hoar of Massachusetts, Billy Mason 
of Illinois, and P'tchfork Tillman of South 
Carolina. The exact age of Senator Hoar is 
not found among the records. All that is 
knotvn of his early existence is that he was 
discovered by a band of archaeologists in the 
ruins of Thebes. He was in an excellent state 
of preservation and it was first believed that 
he was one of the Pharaohs, but upon deci- 
phering some rude characters on the hem of 
his garment it was found that he dated back 
to the reign of the shepherd kings. The 
Egyptians could tell nothing of him except 
that they had looked upon him as a priest of 
Apis the Hull. He was brought to this coun- 
try at considerable expense by the secretary 
and treasurer of the Sunset club and placed 
in the United States Senate, where he may be 
seen by all students of rare antiques. Senator 
Mason was the original cliff dweller, accord- 
ing to Charles Lummis and other authentic 
tradition. But it is to tradition alone we 
must look for information regarding this 
wonderful specimen of ^Chicago k bric-a-brac. 



It is too bad that history is of such recent 
discovery for Mason is one of the most inter- 
esting studies that is now extant. He weighs 
several tons and it h commonly believed he 
possesses more than one set of brains. But 
in the affairs of life he has so far had occasion 
to use but one set, and possibly none at all. 
Before he was a cliff dweller Mason was a 
brother in-law of Mars and Charlie Eagan, 
from whom he imbibed his warlike nature. 
Senator Tillman first saw light 705 B. C. and 
at once became a favorite and is said to be in- 
directly related by polygamy to the Sloppy 
sisters of Redondo. Tiring of life at Pasadena 
he moved to South Carolina, where he has 
plunged around like a bull in a china shop 
for many centuries. Like his colleagues above 
named he has opposed the gift of Hawaii, the 
occupation of Cuba and the annexation of 
Porto Rico and the Philippines. He is now 
engaged in gathering clews of the "crime of 
'73" and would have been opposed to the 
Louisiana purchase, the Gadsden and Alaska 
purchases, the admission of Texas and Cali- 
fornia, the Declaration of Independence, Yan- 
kee Doodle and the employment of City Water 
arbitrators at $25 per day. 

The Hop of Senator Simpson, the goody 
goody, from Bulla to Bums, on Thursday, 
was the sensation of the week at Sacramento 
and elsewhere throughout the State. If the 
Senator was strictly honest in his motives — 
and our long observation prompts us to sus- 
pect most men and women who oppose Sun- 
day newspapers and the moderate use of any 
viand or potable by others more moderate in 
the use of many things than themselves than 
those they may prescribe or deem proper as 
objects that will bear watching — then he has 
been singularly unfortunate as well as honest. 
But it must be borne in mind that had the 
S nator cast his changed vote for Grant or 
Bard or Slauson the tremendous howling 
would have been all in other directions. Every 
man in the State is mighty tired of the dead- 
lock; but, all the same, he is prepared to hit 
any legislator a savage whack should the lat- 
ter deign to vote according to his own dic- 
tates If all the legislators "stay put" we 
shall never have another Senator. Sureiy, if 
Simpson is truly honest, we do not see how he 
could have changed for Grant. 

The sudden death of President Faure 
comes as a shock and is only a little less 
startling than the dramatic taking off of his 
illustrious predecessor. It may mean a good 
deal for France, which is already in the throes 
of internal foment, and betraying a tendency 
to Napoleonic military methods and social 
extravagance. But France has been only a 
republic in name since Thiers and Gambetta. 

The entire press of the Coast go after the 
millionaire sport because he withdrew all his 
horses and vehicles from the Horn: Show be- 
fore it was over because he was not given the 
first prize in the Huntington bowl contest. 
The Wasp and News-Letter even sling poetry 
at their victim, and others just give him a 
plain roast. Well, it was a small piece of 
business for a vice-president of the Standard 
Oil Company, really. 



I 



Western Graphic 



DIVORCED ON THE DESERT 



OR 



The Vicissitudes of a Pioneer's Life 

A True Story of the Pacific Coast 



By Ben C. Tkuman 

Authoh of "Semi-Tropical California," "Occidental Sketches," "Homes 
and Happiness in California," "Tourists' Illustrated Guide," 
"Crescent City and Golden Gate," "History of the 
World's Fair in Chicago," The Field of Honor," 
See How It Sparkles," Etc., Etc. 

Copyrighted 189U by Geo. Rice & Sons 

CHAPTER I 

[continued from last week.] 

TN LESS THAN AN HOUR Mrs. Hathaway and Janet were on the 
1 Carson road, and Andrew, astride of an old saddle horse, moved off 
sorrowfully in another direction. 

Neither party looked back until a gap of many miles had been 
opened, each expecting that the other would yield. At last, Andrew 
turned his animal about, and, to his utter astonishment, no living object 
met his gaze in that vast expanse. His heart sank within him; great 
scalding tears chased each other down his rugged cheeks; despair took 
possession of his soul, and the miserable man cried, in agonizing 
accents: 

" Divorced on the desert ! My God ! What have I done?" 

Then he wheeled about and pursued his course, the very incarna- 
tion of misery. Once he turned and rode a mile or two on a canter the 
opposite way. But the 

mountain breezes blew _^ 
the dust before him, and 
he at times became com- 
pletely enveloped in 
clouds of alkali sand and 
other sedimentary mat- 
ter. With nerves and 
reason almost shattered, ^ 
he went into camp weary 
and alone the first night 
of the separation. 

In the meantime Mrs. 
Hathaway and her 
daughter had joined the 
party that had started 
in advance of them, and 
had got along the first 
day as pleasantly as 
could have been expected 
under the circumstances. Janet firmly believed that her father would 
join them during the night; but when morning came and found him 
not, she burst into tears and wept bitterly. The mother was over- 
whelmed with gri .f, but only once did she give way to her feelings, and 
that was when Janet said: 

"I dreamed so much of my papa last night. Oh! my poor, dear 
papa; I wonder where he is? Oh! mamma, I must have my dear papa 
back. He was ahvays good to me, and he was generally good to you. 
You scolded him too much, sometimes, and oh, I am so afraid we shall 
never see him again— oh, dear — oh, dear — my papa, my dear papa ; I 
am afraid I have lost him forever — oh! — oh! — " 

These sobs and utterances entered like daggers into the wife's heart, 
and then ehe wished to God that she had taken the Lassen trail. She 
even went so far as 10 consult with a number of the prominent members 
of her newly-found compagnons du voyage upon the feasibility of return- 
ing, but all opposed such a course as adding folly to folly. 

"If it should commence to snow to-day, and you and your husband 
were traveling as quickly as your animals would permit, toward each 
other, you would never see each other again," exclaimed the guide of 
the party. "The snows sometimes come mighty early, and they cover 
up the trails mighty fast. If it should commence to snow this minute, 
you would get lost in an hour, and soon starve or freeze to death. When 
I tell you that I am one of the original relief sent to succor the Donner 
party, you know that I talk sound talk, and no mistake. Not that I 
think it will storm for several weeks yet, however. But you have pro- 
ceeded too far to turn back, alone, snow or no snow. I guess the old 
man passed a mighty mean night of it last night though, without you; 




Divorced on the rf< n HI 
I </t, nr.'" 



Mil God! What hare 



and I shouldn't be a bit astonished to see him join us sometime to-day." 
" Oh ! I hope so," cried Janet. 

" Ah I my child, you don't know your poor father as well as I do," 
responded the mother. w He will never join us by the Carson trail." 

" But he will hurry up and reach us by some other way, won't he?" 
asked Janet. 

"Heaven help him, I trust that he may," articulated Mrs. Hatha- 
way, in accents of emotion. 

Just before going into camp the second evening after the separation, 
the guide rode up to the forlorn woman and said : 

" I have been watching for your husband all day; but I guess he 
has made up his mind to stick to the Lassen trail." 

" You may be sure of it. I know him too well to even hope for his 
return. But I have forgiven him, all the same, and shall pray for him, 
God bless him, every night before I retire, until we meet again." 

And what of the obstinate husband? Where was he upon the even- 
ing of the second day? Upon the evening of the second day, while Mrs. 
Hathaway and Janet were in camp on the banks of the Carson River, 
the husband partook of his evening meal at a spring well up on the 
slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, nearly one hundred miles distant 
from his seceding wife. Were they thinking of each other? Yes; and 
upbraiding themselves vigorously for having divorced themselves upon 
the desert in such a ridiculous way. And what thought Hathaway of 
the Lassen trail ? 

"Confound the Lassen trail!" were his last words on the evening 
of the second day; " it's all dust and alkali." 

The reader is quietly informed, however, that there was fully as 
much, if not more, dust and alkali encountered along the Carson. 

CHAPTER II. 

"From the earliest dates of chronological facts or fiction, down to the 
very threshold of the era in which we live,'' declares Professor Alexan- 
der Winchell, "mountains have commanded the supremest worship 
and admiration, and have symbolized many of the most noted and 
profoundest epochal events recorded in the pages of the world's history. 
There is more in mountains than the novelty of the outlook from their 
summits. They stir the higher susceptibilities of the intellect by their 
magnitude, their loftiness, their grandeur, the unapproachableness of 
their summits — their symbolism of power and eternity. No man can 
contemplate the aspects presented by a nobly up-lifted pinnacle or dome 
without feeling that his thought is expanded, unchained and newly- 
gifted; and that a new birth has been given him. There is more than 
this in the influence of mountains. They elicit and exercise the 
morale of the soul. They fire the soul with a spirit of veneration. 
They are the symbols of infinite power. They are the homes of frost, 
and silence, and mystery — the brows which bear the wreath of the 
clouds — the eyries of the lightning and the thunder — the palaces of 
infinite power and majesty. They restrain us from their presence 
like august monarchs. They reach up to heaven and reflect a celes- 
tial radiance down to us, while we, in our weakness, must remain 
below." 

However willing may be the heart and the pen, it would be impos- 
sible for the author to roam at ease or at length upon so grand a sub- 
ject as the mountains of California. And while the fame and the 
beauty of the Alleghanies and the Blue Ridge, and the Catskills and 
the Adirondacks, and the snow-ciad summits of the back-bone of our 
continent have been apostrophized in painting and in verse; and while 
we are not unmindful that some "Songs of the Sierra" have been sung 
in other than a minor key — still, the opportunity to present to the 
reader some information regarding some of the most noted earth giants 
of California is fervidly embraced; and v.hile no writer can ever hope 
to poetically create another Aararat. Sinai, Horeb, Calvary, Atlas, Pin- 
dus, Olympus, or Parnassus, we are impressed with the belief that the 
day is not far distant when the fame and influence of the California 
Mountains, with their incomparable forests, and water falls, and riv- 
ers, and lakes, will not only rank with but eclipse even that of the 
Alps, the Appenines, the Jura, the Cevennes, the Vosges, and the Cote 
d'Or. 

The reader is informed that there are two great masses in California 
called, respectively, the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the Coast Range. 
The former extend on the east, from the Tejon Pass, latitude 35° to Las- 
sen's Peak, latitude 40° 30', 450 miles, according to some auihorities, or 
to Mount Shasta (78 miles further north) according to others. The 
Coast Range extends through the entire length of California on the 
west, from about latitude 32° to latitude 42° a distance of over 600 
miles. The former range has been parallelized with the Alps, and com- 
pares with the latter favorably in general extent and average elevation. 
The Coast Ringe, while inferior in most respects to the Sierra Nevada, 
greatly resembles the Appalachain chain, and is the watershed for the 



Western Graphic 



5 



tens of thousands of orchards and vineyards, and gardens and home- 
steads, which horder the broad Pacific from Crescent City to San Diego. 
The Coast Range is also noted for its subordinate ranges and detached 
spurs, many of which are indescribably picturesque and beautiful; and 
also for the incomparable climate and healthfulness of the delightful 
valleys at its base; and for its multiplicity of warm and cold mineral 
springs, whose healing waters beckon the valetudinarian to seek and 
secure a new lease of life. 

On the fifth day after his separation from his wife Hathaway en- 
countered a party of nineteen men and women, most of whom were 
bound for Oregon, but who had been in camp a week or more at some 
hot springs near the margin of Honey Lake, whicli body has an altitude 
of four thousand two hundred feet, and is situated in what is now 
called Lassen county, and perpetuates the name of Peter Lassen, an 
early explorer, who was killed by Indians in 1859. 

In his rage Hathaway had not only separated from wife and 
daughter, but he had taken with him nothing at all of value — not even 
money, nor much fooJ, nor other means of subsistence. So, when he 
rode slowly into camp on the occasion referred to, hungry, and sick, 
and sore, he seemed more like a spectre than a human being. And it 
was not strange that the youngest camper in the party, upon perceiving 
the bewildered, dusty-looking pilgrim, should have ejaculated — 

" The devil ! " 

"Not the devil, my mistaken young friend," replied Hathaway, 
with extraordinary felicity, under the circumstances; but a deacon — 
deacon of an Iowa church; a very silly deacon though — a deacon who 
ought to have had the top of his head shot right off and — 

"Neither the devil nor a deacon," exclaimed the first speaker; "but 
a lunatic, as sure as you're born." 

"Yes; he's crazy all the way through — I can see that at a glance," 
added another: "who are you at any rate?" he continued, addressing 
himself to the distressed one; " where do you hail from, and where are 
you bound ? " 

Hathaway looked 
leisurely over the 
crowd, all of which 
had gathered curious- 
ly around him, and 
said: 

" My friends, if you 
will permit me to sa 
lute you as such, I 
will inform you, truth- 
fully, respectfully, and 
sorrowfully, that I am 
a pretty good sized 
fool!" 

" A nice deacon, 
eh?" exclaimed How- 
ard, the young scamp 
of the party, who had 




"No/ tlie devil, my mistaken young friend.' 



been the first to greet the poor wayfarer. 

"Deacon no more, you young scapegrace!" shouted Hathaway, 
wildly. " I'm not only a fool, but the most stupendous idiot on the 
face of the earth. I am the most miserable human being at this moment 
living! " 

"Most miserable?" inquired the crowd, in concert. 

" Yes; most miserable, most wretched, most criminal 1 " 

" Most criminal? " 

" Yes; most criminal. I am not fit to live. I ought to be tarred 
and feathered, and rode out of the country on a rail. I ought to be 
shot. I " 

"Well no matter what ought to be done with you or to you," 
exclaimed one of the party, moving up closely to the pilgrim; " what 
have you been doing— what is your crime? Out with it — there's no law 
in these mountains for anterior crimes — what's the matter? Ain't 
killed any one, have you?" 

" Worse than that." 

" Worse than that ! " cried all. 

" I have never killed a person, my friends, but I have broken a 
good woman's heart. Five days ago I became enraged at my wife over 
a trivial matter, and abandoned her at a point where the Carson and 
Lassen trails intersect each other. That is my crime, in one short 
chapter; but the description of my grief during the five days which 
have elapsed would fill a volume. I have eaten hardly nothing since 
the morning I 'eft my wife and daughter so basely, and I would just 
as leave die as live. In fact, I am not fit to live." 

"Well, we'll see about that, said one, assisting Hathaway to dis- 
mount, and leading him to a place where supper was about to be 



served. Then he gave the unfortunate wayfarer a cup of whiskey, 
while another brushed him off, and in other ways the refugee became 
the object of collective attention and commiseration. 

After partaking of a substantial supper Hathaway felt greatly 
refreshed, and related in detail the episode which led up to his separa- 
tion. He had taken no money, he said, from the two thousand dollars 
which he had given to his wife at the commencement of the overland 
journey, and which she had sewed up in a bag and had fastened in 
some way into the bottom of their wagon. 

"All I have as a remembrance of my darling VaslUi," Andrew 
added, " is this bracelet;" holding up to the gaze of the interested ones 
a heavy solid-gold bracelet as he spoke; "this bracelet belongs to a 
pair which came down from family to family to Mrs. Hathaway, and 
has always been regarded most precious as an heirloom. We had 
decided, some time previous to our departure, to each take one, so that, 
in case of casualty, or robbery, or other incident which might ordinarily 
lose us both we might, by such a method, save either the one or the 
other. No matter what may happen to me, I will never part with this 
sacred remembrance of her, whom I have so basely treated, under any 
circumstances. My friends, you have been very good to a very bad 
man, and I want to thank you, many times, for your hospitality, and 
to apologize for my profanity in the presence of women. Still, I want 
to whisper, all the same, into the men's ears, that I am a d " 

" No, no, no," all cried; " we won't have it that way." 

" There are lots of worse men than you, and bigger fools, I guess," 
added one of them. " It will turn out all right in the end, so don't give 
way to grief, old fellow." 

Then the party retired for the night, and all but five were on their 
way to Oregon long before Hathaway had been summoned to breakfast 
by those who remained. These were trappers and hunters, who made 
their nomadic homes in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, ranging from 
Honey Lake to those beautiful, fertile valleys which nestle in numbers 
near the base of Mount Shasta. 

In a few days Hathaway had become as rugged and well as when 
he left Iowa, and he had determined to winter with the trappers and 
hunters who had been so kind to him, and who were on their way to 
what is now known as Surprise Valley, lying in the extreme north- 
eastern corner of the State, and one of the most fertile and beautiful of 
all that network of valleys lying in the Northern spurs, being skirted 
on its sides with elevated ridges of timber, and watered by numerous 
never-dying rivers and streamlets, and covered with luxuriant growths 
of wild oats and clover and other nutiitious grasses. 

On their way to Surprise Valley, Lassen's Peak was seen at its best 
by Hathaway, who had begun to forget wife and daughter in his rap- 
ture for the mountains which had already become his adopted home. 
Lassen's Peak has four summits, the highest of which has an altitude of 
eleven thousand two hundred and thirty feet. These summits are 
undoubtedly the remaining portions of what was once the rim of an 
immense crater, formed when Lassen was an active volcano. At an 
elevation of between six and nine thousand feet there are numerous 
traces of well-marked glacial action, while for many miles around are 
scattered clusters of irregular truncated cones and lava beds, and hot 
springs emitting more or less quantities of gases and steam. I have 
never seen a mountain except Hood that could at all compare with 
Lassen's Peak when reflecting the rays of a summer evening's descend- 
ing sun. It is worth a trip across the continent to see. 

Hut the grandest earth giant of all is Shasta. This isolated vol- 
canic mountain has an elevation of 14,444 feet, and stands as a sentinel 
at the extreme northern limit of the Sacramento Valley. It seems to be 
the culminating peak of the series of ranges and spurs uniting the 
Coast Range and Sierra Nevada. It is in latitude 41° 30' north, and 
longitude 12'2° 20' west. While it gives the name to the county of 
Shasta, yet it is situated in the county of Siskiyou. Its summit is 
covered with perpetual snow. On its northeastern slope is situated the 
Whitney ' glacier, first discovered and described by Clarence King. 
I'rior to the acquisition of Alaska, the rivers of ice on Mount Hood in 
Oregon; Mount Ranier in Washington, and the glaciers of Shasta were 
the only known living glaciers of the United States. The Whitney 
glacier is about half a mile in width, and extends down the mountain 
for a distance of two or more miles. On the eastern slope is another 
glacier called the Mud Creek glacier. From beneath this glacier Hows a 
large stream of muddy water, bearing an immense amount of sediment. 
This sediment comes from the grinding of the lava as the glacier slowly 
movesdown the mountain, and has undoubtedly filled up several small 
valleys and created several large areas of level land during the ages of 
which no man knows. Some of the level valleys created by it are now 
used and occupied by settlers, as Nabor's Valley and Huckleberry 
Valley. During the warmer weather of summer Mud Creek cuts out a 
channel in one of the valleys it has created, and pours its turbid waters 
into the crystal stream of the McCloud River. At times the volume of 
water from the mud glacier is so large that for days it has discolored 
the McCloud for a distance of forty miles. The perpetual snow of 
Shasta is the reservoir from which arises the Sacramento River, Shasta 
River, Butte Creek, Squaw Creek, and the McCloud River. 

TO UK CONTINUED 



6 




In the Gay Life 

TT IS SELDOM that the week of Ash 
Wednesday, with Mardi Gras night and 
the gaieties of the last days hefore Lent, also 
includes St Valentine's day and its train of 
festivities as it has this year. The penitential 
season always exerts a quieting influence upon 
fashionable life and large entertainments and 
cotillions cease and give place to five weeks of 
jolly little suppers, quiet luncheons and din- 
ners of oysters and terrapin and the abstemi- 
ous fare of such shellfish, Crustacea and mol- 
lusca. The social functions must be no longer 
exciting but merge into delightfully informal 
affairs. The last mad whirls ending the mid- 
winter pleasures were more crowded than usual 
as Valentine, that frisky calendared saint, 
bad to have his fling at the gay life before the 
parting of the ways — the path from electric 
flashing ball room to dimly lit cathedral. For 
ever since Madame Royale, daughter of Hen- 
ry the Fourth of France, built a palace near 
Turin and dedicated it to Valentine, a saint 
at that time held in high esteem, and began 
giving fetes in his honor, it has been the cus- 
tom to give parties on the fourteenth of Feb- 
ruary at which flowers and hearts, cupids and 
love tokens, are exchanged. 

The Midwinter Cotillion Club met at Kra- 
mer's Hall Monday night, the leader being 
D. Mountjoy Cloud. About one hundred and 
seventy-five young people were dancing and 
many new figures were introduced, the favors 
being valentines, fans, rosettes, flowers, and 
such dainty trifles. Wismer's orchestra fur- 
nished music and Christopher and Sparks 
catered. The members "look upon this last 
meeting as quite the most enjoyable club 
dance of the season and are rejoiced that two 
more, to be hoped as pleasant, are 10 follow. 

There was a pretty wedding at St. John's 
Episcopal church on Tuesday evening, the 
Bishop uniting Jessie Brooks Patterson and 
Victor Morris Tyler. The bride is the younger 
daughter of Mrs. Alfred Solano of this city 
and the groom a son of Mr. and Mrs. Morris 
F. Tyler of New Haven, Conn. The c hurch 
decorations were by Captain F. Edward Cray 
and were in green and white. Palms and 
ferns were massed about the chancel, relieved 
by the purity of bride roses, and smilax can- 
opied and entwined the altar and woodwork. 
The Lohengrin and Mendelssohn wedding 
marches and a Bridal Sung by Jensen were 
played on the organ by Mr. Owen Foster. 
The bride wore a handsome robe of pearl 
white satin, en train, the corsage garnitured 
with point lace. She carried a sheaf of bride 
roses with white ribbon s'reamers and was 
enveloped in a misty veil of white tulle. She 
was attended by her sister, Mrs. Walter Jar- 
vis Barlow, gowned in white satin, with an 
elaborate overdress of silk net, who carried 
pink roses, also ribbon tied. The best man 
was Dr. Barlow. Mr. and Mrs. Tyler will re- 
side in New Haven. Mrs. Tyler has spent 
most of her girlhood days in New York and 
travel abroad, but during her brief visits to 
her mother in Los Angeles she has endeared 
herself to many, the potent charm of beauty 
and grace of manner always finding hosts of 
admirers and winning friends whenever, as so 
seldom, it is chanced upon. A recent bereave- 
ment in the family of the groom, and the ill- 



Western Graphic 

ness of Mrs. Solano, necessitated a quiet wed- 
ding, and so no invitations were issued for 
the ceremony. 

Mrs. George Steckel and her sister, Miss 
Zara Dewey, entertained over a hundred ladies 
with a valentine party on Tuesday afternoon 
at the residence of the former on South Hope 
street. The hostesses were assisted in receiv- 
ing by Mesdames John J. Jones, Willard 
Stimson, A. J. Morlan, Fred A. Hines, Wil- 
liam H. Griffith, Willard J. Doran, Calvert 
Foy, C. C. Parker and Miss Irene Poehler. 
The decorations of the entire house were in 
pink and green; potted palms and ferns, 
papyrus and smilax, were used as an effective 
background for the strings of pink heart and 
scarfs of gauze, pink roses and carnations, 
that formed the lovely combination of colors, 
and Dan Cupid lurked in every ambush and 
poised his arrow at the most bewitching dam- 
sels. Other tiny gods of love presided over 
the destinies in the dining room, a fairy-like 
Eros swinging over the table. Arrow-pierced 
hearts were also suspended, showing the cause 
of some of the empty quivers of these naughty 
little chaps, St. Valentine's courier. Angling 
in the fish pond for heart-shaped trophies 
was another pleasant diversion. Reynolds 
catered, serving pink ices and bonbons em- 
blematic of the day. 

Judge and Mrs. Stephen C. Hubbell of 
Pleasant avenue entertained at hearts on 
Tuesday evening in honor of the natal day of 
St. Valentine. Cupid was trumps and the 
score cards of the gentlemen bore his coat of 
arms — an arrow-pierced heart — while the 
ladies' tally cards were also hearts, but not 
shattered. These were cleverly gotten up by 
Mrs. Bancroft and were embellished with 
violets in water color and gilt scroll work and 
tied with mauve ribbons. The pink-shaded 
lights in the long drawing room cast a soft 
glow over the smilax-hung walls, masses of 
green and handsome furnishing, while beds of 
violets offered up their incense at the altar of 
St. Valentine. Poinsettias and bamboo were 
used in the dining room and yellow blossoms 
in the library'. Mrs. Hubbell, gowned in shell 
pink brocade and gauze, was assisted by her 
daughter, Miss Lora, who was girlishly sweet 
and lovely in pure white taffeta and lace. 
The prizes were awarded to Miss Lila Fair- 
child, Miss Helen Fairchild and Mrs. John 
Francis; Mr. Walter Barnwell, Major Bonsall 
and Dr. Bryant; and were, for the ladies, a 
gilt clock and cut glass vase, and for the gen- 
tlemen, a fancy cut-gla^s ink stand and 
crystal loving cup. The consolation prizes 
were heart-shaped boxes of bonbons, band 
painted with purple violets and ribbon tied. 
Reynolds catered. Nearly a hundred young 
people, including the brides of the season, 
were entertained by Judge and Mrs. Hubbell 
on this occasion. 

Mrs. James G. Scarborough of Constance 
street gave a valentine musicale on Wednes- 
day afternoon, asking some forty guests to 
meet her sister, Mrs. Albert Carlos Jones, who 
has recently returned from a lengthy stay in 
New York. Double hearts were suspended 
from the chandeliers in the drawing room and 
smilax and pale green ribbons, white carna- 
tions and ferns were used in decoration. The 
singers appeared to the audience as in a living 
picture, being framed by a large valentine 
composed of flowers, ferns, ribbons and cupids, 
banked on either side by palms and potted 
plants. And as the ladies participating in 
the program are recognized as among our 
most beautiful women, the idea was carried 
out in a pleasing manner, the gown effects 
also lending much to the ensemble. The vocal 
numbers were: Duet, "A figlia incanta" 
(Donizetti,) Mrs. Orr Haralson and Mrs. Scar- 



borough; "Love's Dream" (Liszt), Mrs. Cal- 
vert Wilson; "It Is Not Always May " and 
" When to Thy Vision " (Gounod), Mrs. Scar- 
borough; violin solo, Mrs. Hugh Macneil; 
"My Dreams" (Tosti), Mrs. Haralson; duo, 
' Guarany" (Gomez) Mr. and Mrs. Modini 
Wood; " Madrigal" (Victor Harris), and "The 
Sweetest Story Ever Told" (Schultz), Mrs. 
Jones; quartette, " Rigoletti " (Donizetti), 
Mr. and Mrs. Wood, Mrs. Scarborough and 
Dr. Semler. ,Y rs. W. D. Larrabee was the 
accompanist. 

Mrs. L. Grant Goucher of West Twenty- 
third street entertained at luncheon on Mon- 
day. Ten guests were seated about the table 
which was set with violets and ferns, vases of 
these dainty blossoms being placed on Batten- 
berg doilies, over lilac silk, all adown the 
table. The place cards were in white and 
gold. Broad ribbons and smilax were also 
used in decoration, with many bows and 
knots and graceful garlands. 

The Misses Milner of West Washington 
street entertained with a valentine party 
Tuesday evening. The games were followed 
by a Dutch supper at which the guests were 
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Horton, Mrs. H. M. Sale, 
Misses Christine Kurtz, Abby Easton, Daisy 
Cross, Messrs. Will Alton, Joe Easton, Rich- 
ards, McKeegan, Off and Dr. John McGarry. 

Mrs. L. W. French of the Hotel Melrose 
gave a lunch party on Tuesday in honor of 
St. Valentine's day. A square of- dainty 
drawn work over rose satin and a Venetian 
vase holding carnations and ferns occupied 
the center of the table, while the same flower 
and feathery bits of asparagus plumosus 
dotted the cloth. The place cards were arrow- 
speared hearts, with water color designs of 
fancy heads. Amid the potted palms and 
ferns about the room were displayed hearts 
in all forms of subjection Pink carnations 
were on the mantel and buffet and carried 
out the blending of the 'two colors most 
charmingly. Covers were laid for ten. 

Miss Mary Babcock of South Alvarado 
street entertained thirty guests at luncheon 
on Thursday, complimentary to her sister, 
Mrs. Herbert Leroy Jones of Chicago, a bride 
of two seasons. The entire arrangements 
were extremely pretty, the company of ladies 
being seated at quartette tables throughout 
all the lower rooms. The ribbons, the flowers 
and the appointments of each apartment were 
carried out on a different line of decoration, 
for in the hall were smilax, La France roses 
and pink ribbons; in the dining room, ferns, 
violets and mauve ribbons; in the drawing 
room, carnations and asparagus and so on 
through the blend of daffodils, roses, marguer- 
ites, blueites and mignonette. The place 
cards were slips of ribbon, lettered in gold. 
A harpist added much to the pleasure of the 
afternoon. 

Mrs. Walter S. Newhall of Newhall Place, 
Twenty-third street, gave an elaborate lunch 
party of ten covers on Thursday, the guests 
being asked to meet her mother, Mrs. H. M. 
Newhall of San Francisco. The decorations 
were in pink and green. A mirror, in the 
center of the table, reflected a tall, cut glass 
vase of carnations and ferns; broad ribbons, 
terminating in bows, transversed the cloth 
and circles of finely wrought Japanese em- 
broideries and completed a charming setting. 
Pendant from the chandelier were slender 
glass tubes of flowers and ferns, giving a fin- 
ishing to the whole. The name cards were 
gay butterflies in pink and gold, set off by 
ribbons. 

Mrs. George A. Montgomery of West 
Twenty-first street, entertained at luncheon 
on Thursday, complimentary to Mrs. J. D 
Montgomery of Brantford, Canada. White 
hyacinths, California violets and ferns were 
used in decoration — a bowl of these lovely 
blooms resting on an elaborate centerpiece of 
Battenberg over lilac silk. The lights were 
shaded in the same tint and the place cards 
were done in water colors and had attached 
to them a posy of hyacinths and violets. 
Covers were laid for fourteen, and after leav- 
ing the dining room the ladies finished the 
afternoon with various games. 



Western Graphic 



7 



Town Talk and prattle 

AS we sit at our open window inhaling the 
aroma of shrub and flower and enjoying 
the roundelays of linnet and thrush in domes 
of orange tree and magnolia and peruse the 
didactic telegrams from nearly all the snow- 
bound and blizzard-blown states in the Union 
we are net making a kick against anything in 
our midst if we know ourselves and we think 
we do. 



Weather permitting the Santa Catalina 
Island Golf Club will give an open handicap 
tournament at the Avalon Club Links today. 
The play today will be devoted to part 
of the handicap competitions for men and 
women. The men are to play thirty-six 
holes and the women eighteen holes, The first 
of these competitions will be played today 
and the last half on tomorrow. The prizes 
for the men are for best gross score, open 
championship and gold medal; first prize for 
best handicap score, silver medal. There 
will also be a second prize for next best han- 
dicap scoie. Similar prizes are offered in the 
woman's competition. On Sunday there wil 
be driving contests for men and women with 
silver medals for the winners. In the after- 
noon there will also be a mixed foursome, 
with first and second prizes. 

By the courteous invitation of Companion 
Fred W. Wood, the February meeting of the 
Southern California Association of Com- 
panions of the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion of the United States was held at 
his residence, No. 401 West Thirty-first street, 
on the evening of Saturday, the 11th inst., at 
eight o'clock. The evening was devoted 
to the memory of Lincoln. There were no 
formal papers, but many Companions paid 
tributes by short talks on some salient 
phase of the character or incident in the life 
of our great War President. 

The visiting companions led off in remi- 
niscences, General Baker's remarks being very 
impressive; he believed that Mr. Lincoln's 
name would be the best known throughout 
civilization in the'ages to come, and that one 
by one of the prominent men of his time 
would drop out among the now unknown and 
that Lincoln would stand out like Alexander 
and Caesar and Washington and Napoleon — 
"Who could now name off-hand any of the 
great generals under Csesar and Alexander?" 
he asked; "how many names of Napoleon's 
most worthy generals can be remembered by 
the present generation?" 

Col. Cobb, ex-member of Congress, bad 
known Mr. Lincoln intimately during the 
war; he had first heard him speak during the 
Harrison campaign of 1840 and later in Illi- 
nois in 1858, when he appeared with Douglas 
in joint debate. Colonel Smith also paid a 
tribute to the character of Mr. Lincoln and 
Major Truman declared that he was the most 
growing man of any age, and that his likeness 
impressed him more and more every time he 
saw it, and that his Gettysburg address was 
the most perfect thing of the kind in our 
language. Major Lee spoke feelingly of Mr. 
Lincoln and of his Gettysburg address, as he 
had been a lieutenant on the staff of General 
Doubled ay at Gettysburg and was on the 
platform when the President made his immor- 
tal remarks. Major Donnell read some anec- 
dotes and Fred Wood read a poem. 



In response to a letter from the organiza- 
tion known as the Blue and the Gray, invit- 
ing the Loyal Legion to join it in the welcome 
to General Shafter and in the celebration of 
Washington's Birthday, Major Trurxan, 
Major Donnell and Captain F. Edward Gray 
were appointed a committee to perfect arrange- 
ments, the vote being unanimous that the 
Legion would join as requested. 

The host had arranged for a substantial 
collation, and the discussion of salads, sand- 
wiches and other edibles, accompanied by pil- 
sener, and a marvelously fine punch, made an 
otherwise radiant evening the more to be re- 
membered, especially as the usual songs were 
indulged in meanwhile. 

Wednesday next is the anniversary of 
Washington's Birthday, which will be cele- 
brated in many fitting ways throughout the 
Union. In Los Angeles it will be celebrated 
by the "Blue and the Gray" in a parade and 
reception to General Shafter, the hero of El 
Caney and San Juan Hill. In the parade 
there promises to be six hundred veterans of 
the Union army and nearly half that num- 
ber of ex-Confederates. The Loyal Legion, 
of whom General Shafter, by the way, is Com- 
mander of the California C^mmandery, will 
turn out in good numbers and will act as per- 
sonal escort of the eminent general who com- 
manded the United States army at Santiago 
and who won the day against tremendous 
obstacles of war and the elements, and who 
did what has been performed by no com- 
mander of modern time3 — captured an entire 
army composed of more men than his own, 
all told, and settled the war in Cuba so far as 
further fighting was concerned. In the eve- 
ning General Shafter will be the guett of the 
Chamber of Commerce at its annual banquet. 

The death of General Bob Chapman on 
the 4th instant, at the age of 71, removes from 
our midst a landmark of true chivalry and 
inexhaustible congeniality. It was a good old 
age for a man who had experienced some of 
the bitter disappointments of life and who had 
been born amidst promises of perpetual sun- 
shine. He had been well educated in his own 
Southern State and finished" at a Northern 
university — Yale, I believe. At the best time 
of his life he entered the service of the Lost 
Cause and fought manfully through to the 
end. He came to Los Angeles soon after the 
close of the war, and at once entered upon the 
practice of law, which profession he prosecuted 
to the end. His whole life in these parts was 
one of merriment, because he was a merry 
soul. His presence in any assemblage was 
like a shaft of light in a dark room. He was 
alike entertaining to the old, the middle aged 
and the young, and at a picnic or a dinner it 
was always a contest for a place near Uncle 
Bob. He was the soul of honor and was 
greatly respected by all who knew him. 

The evolution of vaudeville audiences is 
one of the marvels of the times, and a down- 
stairs assemblage at the Orpheum nowadays 
is as much more select and critical, compared 
to those who were known as habitues five 
years ago, as a diamond is purer than paste. 
If all in front could go behind the scenes and 
read the notices, in dressing-rooms and out, 
they would at once understand why perform- 
ers and performances are so free from the 
slightest double entendre or undertone or 
shrug of shoulder, and why the vaudeville 



business is so acceptable and why it has come 
to stay. It is getting so that people who want 
loges and other select seats must secure them 
days ahead, while first-nighters crowd the 
fashionable pirts of the Orpheum Monday 
nights. Mr. Myers, the new manager, takes 
great pride over his matinee audieno s. He 
impresses it upon all performers that they are 
acting before from a thousand to rising that 
number of young ladies and children of the 
highest respectability, and that nothing must 
be permitted that would cause the slightest 
dislike or disapproval or fear. There is much 
more that may be said of Mr. Myers, who has 
a very agreeable personality. He is undoubt- 
edly the ablest and most satisfactory manager 
the Orpheum has ever had, and this is saying 
a great deal, for Bray and Schimpf and Ros- 
enthal were all favorites with the public and 
the press. 

Down at, Santa Monica there are some 
druggists that have been detected in selling 
liquors as beverages, without a license, and 
who are making a tremendous kick because 
they are not permitted to do so; and, in a 
spirit of revenge, are trying to injure others 
who pay big licenses and obey the laws. These 
same druggists, as a general thing, put up 
little or nothing in the way of giving the town 
artificial attractiveness, and are never to be 
found willing to subscribe towards fireworks, 
music or improvements. All substantial col- 
lections come from Bob Eckert, Heim, O'Brien 
and others, who are compelled to pay high 
licenses besides. If Santa Monica depended on 
its druggists for display* of public spirit the 
old town would have gone glimmering a long 
time ago. The idea that these apothecaries 
may sell spirituous or vinous drinks without 
license is preposterous and an outrage upon 
all those who are comoelled to pay heavily for 
such privileges. But there is no likelihood 
that Mayor Robert Jones and the other trus- 
tees will repeat the folly of killing the goose 
that lays the golden eggs. 

Let no man ever hereafter betray any 
superstition regarding the number 13 in the 
presence of John Forster, whose happiness on 
Tuesday last was of an enlivening kind. 
John's marriage with one of the beautiful 
Senoritas Del Valle took place just 13 years 
ago. It is a boy. 

It was not thunder, nor the breaking of a 
dam, nor a cloudburst, nor an earthquake, nor 
anything at all appertaining to the elements; 
nor was it some Sampson pulling down a 
great temple filled with people, nor the roar of 
cannon from far-off Caloocan or Uoilo ; nor 
was it an explosion of laughter by Mosherand 
the other goats of the Sunset Club. It was 
merely Mr. Gaffey rising to say that the San 
Pedro celebration must take place, and that it 
was just as easy to raise ten thousand dollars 
for said celebration as it was to raise a San 
Juan Capistrano Jackpot. 

The beautiful weather of the past two 
weeks has sent thousands of people to Santa 
Monica, the ride up and down over the Elec- 
tric being irresistibly charming, the country 
all the way being of an emerald hue. On Sun- 
day last this line carried nearly 2200 people, 
many of whom went to Eckert & Hopf's or 
the Arcadia for dinner. By the way, Frank 
Miller is doing a good winter business at the 
Arcadia and Roberto Eckerto is as genial as 
during the gay old summer Sundays when one 
sometimes had to wait half an hour or so for 
a seat. 



8 



Western Graphic 



THE RUSKIN ART CLUB. 

MRS. W. H. BRADLEY, of North Soto 
Street, on Wednesday afternoon enter- 
tained the members of the Ruskin Art Club, 
in honor of the birthday of John Ruskin. The 
rooms were brilliant with color, poinsettias 
and scarlet geraniums, red carnations and 
roses being used in decoration, while smilax 
threaded its way on curtains, chandeliers, 
mirrors, wall and grill. Hicks catered. Several 
delightful musical numbers were given by the 
ladies present, Miss Clara Bosbyshell, Miss 
Mary Chapm an and Miss Edith Day singing 
charming solos, and there was some instru- 
mental music by the Woman's Orchestra. 
Mrs. John Wigmore gave some interesting 
reminiscences of an afternoon spent at the 
home of Ruskin in England, also a little talk 
on his life and works. 

The cloud which came over the intellect of 
John Ruskin in recent years, sad and most 
unfortunate though it was, came too late to 
cast a shadow upon a brilliant and successful 
literary career. Although the cloud never 
lifted, his place in English literature was 
secure as one of its brightest and greatest 
names. In his unfinished autobiography, 
"Praeterita," Mr. Ruskin has given us some 
charming glimpses of his early boyhood, which 
was quite exceptional in its way, as in fact has 
been almost everything connected with his 
life. Ruskin was a Londoner by birth, but a 
Scotsman by habits, training and associations. 

The friends and teachers, the standards 
and influences of his early life were chiefly 
Scottish. Even the writers who inspired and 
directed the main lines of his thought and 
work were Scotsmen, from Sir Walter Scott to 
Carlyle. Though he was born in London he 
was not city bred. He was from his earliest 
childhood familiar with country life, for he 
was always taken away from town during the 
summer, often accompanying his father, who 
was the traveling partner of a firm of wine 
merchants, and at the age of four, when sitting 
for his portrait to James Northcote, he chose 
for the background of the picture what he 
called the "Blue Hills." His summer tours 
were continued yearly, and the repeated visits 
to the river scenery of the west or to the 
mountains of the north made him almost a 
country boy. 

Though refusing to be taught in the ortho- 
dox way — this was also characteristic — he be- 
gan to read and write at the age of four. " He 
preferred," says Mr. Collingwood, "to find out 
a method for himself, which he always did, 
and he found out how to read whole words at 
a time by the look of them, and to write in 
vertical characters, like book print, just as the 
latest improved theories of education suggest." 

At the age of five he was a confirmed book- 
worm, and the books he cared for not only 
fixed him in certain lines of thought, but were 
chosen because of a certain mental "make-up" 
that was later very apparent. 

Ruskin was always a victim to the dread- 
ful habit of putting off the completion of an 
enterprise until "the more convenient season 
which is so long in coming, so that there is 
hardly a title of his which stands before a 
properly finished work." During the summer 
trips everything was observed and turned into 
verse; a habit which lasted and produced the 
notebooks of later years, which supplied the 
materials for his great works. In considering 
the influences which helped to mold the boy 
^Ruskin, one must always have in mind his 
ather — " the household deity of both wife and 




MISS JANET WALDORF— as Rosalind 



child, whose chief delight was in his daily re- 
turn from the city and in his reading to them 
in the drawing-room at Heme Hill." 

Ruskin's talent as a draughtsman was evi- 
denced in his childhood, and in 1831 he was 
given drawing lessons. From the first he 
"cared more to carry away a true record of his 
subject than to produce a pleasing picture." 
His love for the "Blue Hills" of his babyhood 
increased as he grew older, and when he re- 
ceived a copy of Rogers' "Italy" in 1832, the 
vignettes by Turner touched a chord which 
Ruskin had been feeling for years. He took 
Turner, then and there, for his leader and 
master, "and fondly tried to copy the wonder- 
ful 'Alps at Daybreak.' " 

The summer of 1833 the Ruskin family 
spent in the Alps, and at every place young 
Ruskin wrote verses and prose sketches and 
illustrated them with Turneresque vignettes, 
drawn, as one of his biographers tells us, with 
the finest crow-quill pen, to imitate the deli- 
cate engravings. It was in 183G that Ruskin 
began his championship of Turner. Eventually 
he accepted the mission that, he felt laid upon 
him, " to tell the world that art, no less than 
the other spheres of life, had its heroes ; that 
the maintenance of their energy was sincerity, 
and the burden of their utterance truth." This 
was his mission, and nobly and well has he 
performed it. 

OF THEATRICAL STOCK 

IT IS a fact that most of the successful 
stage people of toda}' came from families 
which have been devoted to the stage and its 



art Annie Yeamans, who since the death of 
Mrs. John Drew is the oldest living exponent 
of purely American dramatic art, has given 
to the stage two daughters — Lydia Yeamans 
Titts and Jennie Yeamans. 

Frank Mayo, once one of the noted actors 
of the stage, bequeathed to it his daughter Ele- 
anor, who five years ago made a great success 
when she appeared in "The Princess Bonnie." 
She has since married and retired. His son 
Frank iB a well known theatrical figure. 

Fay Templeton is the daughter of John 
Templetm, who knew everything about the 
show business, from taking tickets at a circus 
to acting as impresario of a grand opera com- 
pany. Her mother is still on the stage. 

Years ago theatre goers used to rave over 
McKee Rankin and his wife, Kitty Blanchard. 
Their fame is still kept before the public by 
Gladys Rankin Drew, wife of Sidney Drew, 
Phyllis Rankin, who is now playing in "The 
Belle of New York." 

Ethel Barrymore came naturally by her 
talent and good looks, for she is the daughter 
of Maurice Barrymore and the late Georgia 
Drew Barrymore. Maude Adams is the daugh- 
ter of Annie Adams, an actress of the old 
school, and Viola Allen's father is Leslie Al- 
len, who scored his principal success in " Men 
and Women." 

Flora Walsh, the first wife of Charles 
Hoyt, was a noted actress and was the daugh- 
ter of Alice Walsh, recognized as one of the 
best "character" actresses on the stage till she 
retired after the death of her daughter. 



Western Graphic 



9 



N(V EMIGRANTS NEEDED 

collier's weekly 

THERE is one of our new territorial ac- 
quisitions to which American citizens 
will feel no temptation to emigrate. In Hawaii 
there seems to be no opening for professional 
acquirements and abilities, or for skilled, or 
even unskilled, labor. It is probably true of 
all countries that there is room at the top, but. 
in the Hawaiian archipelago, the top is un- 
usually crowded with native born or long resi- 
dent competitors. There are still opportunities 
for persons commanding large amounts of 
capital to engage in the production of sugar, 
coffee and fruit for export, but those Ameri- 
cans who have considerable sums of money 
at their disposal would be apt to do quite as 
well at home. As for lawyers, it is well to 
remember that the Honolulu bar comprises 
some seventy members, a number more than 
enough to transact all the law business of the 
country. Of physicans and dentists, there 
are already as many engaged in private prac- 
tice as are to be found in communities of simi- 
lar size in the United States. Of white 
mechanics, the supply is already larger than 
the demand. The number of American and 
European mercantile houses is, even now, out 
of proportion to the trade of the islands, and 
they are subjected to sharp competition from 
the Chinese and Japanese. Skilled domestic 
service has long been in the hands of the 
never fatigued 'Chinese, and the Americans 



have no chance of ousting them from that 
field of employment. For all kinds of un- 
skilled labor the market is overstocked, and 
American citizens would not submit to work 
for the wages with which the Portuguese and 
native Hawaiians are content. On the whole, 
Hawaii will be a good place to stay away 
from, so far as those of our countrymen who 
have to earn a living are "concerned 

RESTmcTibTT^F^UFFRAOE. 

PROM COLLIER'S WKKKLY. 



THE suggestion of Cardinal Gibbons that 
the solution of the race problem in the 
southern states is to be found in a restriction 
of the suffrage by the introduction of educa- 
tional and property qualifications receives un- 
expected support from Mr. Osborne Hunter, a 
well educated and influential member of the 
colored population of the District of Colum- 
bia. Of course, the constitution of the United 
States forbids any restriction of the franchise 
on the score of race, color, or previcus condi- 
tion of servitude. It does not prohibit, how- 
ever, educational and property qualifications; 
on the contrary, such qualifications obtain in 
some of the states today. No doubt the im- 
mediate practical consequence of imposing 
such restrictions would be to disfranchise a 
very large proportion of the negro voters; but, 
as Mr. Hunter has pointed out, the ultimate 
effect would be salutary to the temporarily 
disfranchised section of the population. It 
would powerfully stimulate the negroes to ac- 
quire in the first place, education, and, in the 



second place, property; and it has almost never 
been observed that a negro possessed of both 
education and property has been in ■••cted with 
race antagonism or given trouble to his white 
fellow citizens. 

THE DEAD BOULEVARD 

A PEW months ago the people outside of 
this city exploited a boulevard between 
this city and Pasadena, with a branch lead- 
ing out through the San Gabriel Valley. 
These people to our east have for years asked 
for a road, or drive, or some old way of getting 
into our city, and finally projected a grand 
boulevard, and had the route surveyed and 
Bpent quite a sum of money for right of 
way and to bring it to a successful (?) issue. 
The starting point for the boulevard was to be 
the Plaza, in this city, but the scheme was 
defeated by the property owners in the imme- 
diate neighborhood of the Plaza, who were 
inveigled into signing a protest, etc., that 
some of them have discovered was the worst 
thing they could have done. This article was 
inspired by a property owner on one of the 
streets north of Macy offering the writer 
property at just one-half the price that was 
to be paid if the boulevard was built. This 
same property owner was one of the signers 
of the protest against the boulevard. 

The boulevard is dead, and so is the region 
about the Plaza, and also along the streets 
that killed it — and all because these very 
property owners have ever followed a policy 
of "hogging" everything in sight. I have 
always believed that the circulators of the 
protest worked in the interest of the electric 
railroad and were paid handsomely to defeat 
the boulevard. 

Another result of the defeated boulevard: 
Alhambra and that section have subsidized 
an electric road to run into this city and it 
will not benefit any of the region contiguous 
to the aforesaid boulevard but will land its 
passengers at Fourth and Spring and Broad- 
lway. 

So far as we have progressed with what 
we are pleased to term winter we have had 
too many cold north winds and not enough 
rain. The high winds and cold weather of 
early February did much to avert attendance 
at the Horse Show, which was a most notable 
and courageous undertaking by those who 
were willing to give their valuable time in its 
behalf. It was noteworthy that all last week 
it was bitter cold in San Francisco and from 
10 to 30 degrees below zero in the east. 

Western Graphic has received " Ano 1, 
No. 1 " of the " Babasaey Ombaley," dated 
" Ar Vicente del Prado, Lingaen ika 5 ed 
Diciembre, 1898." The front and back pages 
are done in three colors, on the first being a 
portrait of Emilo Aguinaldo and on the latter 
a Philippine soldier en salute and holding a 
Philippine Hag. It is only a four-page publi- 
cation with pages about nine by twelve inches, 
but is brimful of interesting reading, notably 
articles on " Pagkablaaomi iti isu amin," 
Panponunutenyoman Daytoy," " Anusandak- 
manpay " and " Pangigalang mid kalapagan." 

Some of the magazines have got the war 
down to the sinking of the Maine and it is 
thought the coming generation will arrive in 
time to learn all about the Paris peace com- 
mission. 

Those statesmen who are against the ex- 
pinsion movement's including "the remote 
Philippines" forget that Alaska is more than 
a Btone'fl throw from the United States by 
BOtaal measurement. 




MISS JANET WALDORF— as Pauline 



10 



Western Graphic 





It' IS difficult to decide who is most entitled 
to tell a hard luck story after three big 
policemen walked into the Orpheum Monday 
night and fired out a lot of people who were 
sitting in the aisles and holding up the walls. 
It naturally makes one 6ore to receive such 
treatment and there is no doubt but that the 
management forgot their customary geniality 
while refunding money to the "firees;" but 
contrary to the old saying, "all comes to him 
who waits," the injured ones may be mutually 
pleased if the parties of the second part will 
call at the box office three or four days before 
they wish to see the show. 

AT THE Los Angeles this week there was 
nothing but the memories of pretty 
girls and jol ly music in the dark auditorium, 
excepting on Tuesday afternoon when the 
more serious musicianly folk assembled in 
goodly numbers to hear the last concert of the 
Symphony Orchestra. It was the best of them 
all, well selected and conscientiously played. 
Miss Metcalf has won her place in the hearts of 
Angelenos and her fresh, full voice was never 
heard to better advantage. 

JANET WALDORF has a power that is not 
for life, the power of the charm of youth. 
One cannot but think of the "golden oppor- 
tunities of youth" when listening to Miss 
Waldorf's clear, young voice or watching her 
graceful, lithe figure in her most youthful 
roles. There are more and more frequent 
flashes of spontaniety of action in her work 
and it is only a question of years, spent in 
struggling against the indifference to her bril- 
liance of youth and the severity of her critics, 
until this young woman stands on her own 
pinnacle, worshipped by those who feel not 
except when forced by the power of experi 
ence and maturity. 

WE certainly saw the real thing in cake 
walk and com specialties in Clorindy 
at the Orpheum this week. It was fine, and 
according to the young man who is the com- 
poser and director of the music of Clorindy, 
rag-time opera and cake walking are but in 
their infancy. 

Giacinta Delia Rocca is a beautiful young 
woman and an accomplished violinist. It is 
one thing to be an artist for the love of art 




but quite another to be an artist and please 
the people. Mile. Rocca has struck the happy 
combination and with her soulful eyes and 
dignified bearing completely captured her 
audiences. After the rapturous effusions on 
Papinta in another column I resign for this 
week. 



Columbia Theatre in Chicago last August. Miss Jessie 
Conant who will be seeu in the cast of "Why Smith 
Left Home" next week is a native daughter and has 
grown up in and about Los Angeles. She is a daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Padgham of Pomona and studied 
music in this city under well known local teachers. 
She is the possessor of a voice which has been termed 
phemonenal. During the engagement of "Why 
Smith Left Home" at the Columbia Theatre in Chi 




MLLE. (JIAC'INTA DEI. I. A KOCCA, Violiniste, at the orpheum. 



Simpson Auditorium— Southern California num- 
bers among its cultured music lovers Sousa's warmest 
admirers. The magnetic man of marches and melo- 
dies captures us all. His superb organization and his 
lichly gifted soloists assure this community pleasures 
of the highest order. The most interesting and eager- 
ly expected musical event of the season will be the 
forthcoming appearance of Sousa and his band in 
Los Angeles during the course of "The March King's" 
great transcontinental tour. He will appear at Simp- 
son Auditorium on the 14th and 16th of March in 
two matinees and two evening performances. 



cago this season the Chicago newspapers spoke highly 
of Miss Conant's accomplishments as a vocalist, and 
her singing has been greeted with enthusiasm in every 
city where the company has appeared. During the 
action of the play Miss Conant sings two songs, which 
have been selected by her from American composers 
The people of Los Angeles will no doubt be greatly 
inte-ested in so fair, so accomplished and so talented 
a representative of the City of the Angels. The en- 
gagement of "Why Smith Left Home" will be lor four 
nights with a special holiday matinee on Wednesday 
besides the regular Saturday matinee. 



ABBIE MITCHELL 
Prima Donna of the "Clorindy Troupe— at the Orpheum 



Los Angeles Theatre— The company engaged to il- 
lustrate Geo H. Broadhurst's new farce "Why Smith 
Left Home," which will be the attraction at the Los 
Angeles Theatre next week beginning Wednesday af- 
ternoon and evening, February 22nd, is a strong one 
judging from its roster and includes Maclyn Arbuckle, 
M. B. Snyder, Harry Webster, Fred W. Peters, Rose 
Snyder, C. Jay Williams, Rose Stuart, Mrs. Annie 
Yeamans, Gertrude Roosevelt, Blanche Chapman, 
Dorothy Usner and Jessie Conant. "Why Smith Left 
Home" will be presented here with the complete 
scenic amplitude, beautiful costumes and novel stage 
accessories which marked its initial production at the 



Burbank — The romantic Grecian drama, " Ingo- 
mar," will be presented by Janet Waldorf at the Bur- 
bank theater Saturday and Sunday evenings for the 
first time during her engagement. In the role of the 
Grecian maiden " Parthenia" Miss Waldorf is at her 
best, many critics placing her among the greatest in 
this part. During the farewell week of her engage- 
ment in this city Miss Waldorf will present five 
plays. An elaborate production of Lady of Lyons 
is announced for Monday and Tuesday evenings. 
Ingomar is to be repeated at the Wednesday matinee. 
" Romeo and Juliet " will be played Wednesday and 
Thursday evenings and " Much Ado about Nothing " 



Western Graphic 



u 




ROSE STUART, Wil li WHY SMITH LEFT HOME-at the Los Angeles 



Friday and Saturday evenings. A " request matinee" 
will be given Saturday next, the selection of the 
play being left to the patrons of the theater. 

The spectacular extravaganza, " Spider and Fly," 
is booked to follow Janet Waldorf at the Burbank. 



Orpheum — A star of unusual prominence in the 
vaudeuille world — Milton Nobles — heads the Orphe- 
um's new bill for next week. With his charming and 

T3URBANK THEATER 

I I Main St., bet. Fifth and Sixth. Tel. M 1270 
■ M ~^ C. A. SHAW, Lessee 

FAREWELL KrPERTnrBF , 

" In gomar "—Saturday and Sundiiy, Feb. 18 and IS). 
" Lady of Lyons "—Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 20 and 21. 
" Inijomar " — WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY MATINEE. 
"Komeo and Juliet "—Wednesday and Thursday, Feb. 22 
and 23. 

"Much Ado About Nothing "—Friday and Saturday, 

Feb. 24 and 25 
Request Matinee— Saturday Afternoon, Feb. 25. 



talented wife, Dolly, he is to 
present a comedy ol his own 
authorship, called " Why 
Walter Reformed." Nobles 
has been a star in the "le- 
nitimite" for many years. 
In California he lias always 
been an especial favorite. 
His plays, "From Sire to 
Son," and "Phoenix," have 
have their scenes laid in Cal 
ifornia's early days. In the 
east, Nobles has been held in 
high esteem for his talents as 
an actor, and his qualities as 
a man. He is president of one 
of the leading dramatic or- 
ganizations of the country. 
In vaudeville he has added 
to his laurels. 

Ola Hayden is a phenom- 
enal girl baritone, heard 
here several years ago, when 
she produced an excellent 
impression. 

A company of "Cham- 
pion Club Swingers," De- 
reuda and Breen, young 
Americans with an enviable 
reputation for fine, clear 
athletic work, are given a 
prominent place on the bill. 
Nothing similar to their per- 
formance has been given at 
the Orpheum. 

The man who wrote, 
"There'll be a Hot Time in 
the Old Town Tonight," Joe 
Hayden, is another new 
comer. He is a musical 
genius, and a comedian of 
parts. With Queenie He- 
therton, he appears in a 

laughable sketch. 

"Clorindy," the great coon spectacle, with its 
dancing, music and cake-walking, has evidently 
caught the fancy of the Orpheum's clientage. It will 
be continued next week, new songs being introduced 
in the spectacle. 

Papinta, the great and glorious, the premier of 
dancers, remains yet another week. Next Wednesday 
is "Papinta Day" at the Orpheum, when beautiful 
souvenirs of the occasion will ba given the ladies 
present. 

Giacinta Delia Rocca, the superb young violinist, 
completes the bill. 



The correct thing, the best style in all 
printing, theatrical printidg is now done by 
the big printing house of Geo". Rice & Sons 
on New High street. Their facilities places 
them at the head, their work now going as far 
north as Portland. 



Hurbank Prices -15, 25, 35, 50, 75, 81. Mctinee, 10, 25. 



Tel. 
Main 70 



OS ANGELES THEATER 

C. M. wood, and H. C. w Y att. Lessees 



THREE NIGHTS ONLY— Thursday , Friday and 
Saturday, Feb. 23, 24, 25. Matinee Saturday 
Broadhurst's Extraordinary Comedy, 

"WinlT JTOTlnl LEFT G1©nE w 

Presented bv the Great Original Company of Comedians, 
including Maclyn Arbuckle, Mrs. Anna Yeamans, Dorothy 
Usuer, Jessie Couant and others. 

Keats Now on Sale. 

PRICES— 25c, 50c and 75c. TEL. Main 70. 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIEST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vandeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, Feb. 20. 

Milton and Dolly Noble*, presenting a Comedy In One Act, 
by Milton Nobles, entitled "Why Walker Kelormed." 

Derrnda and Hreen, Champion Double Club Jugglers, Ori- 
ginators of Club Juggling on Pedestals. 

Ola Hayden, the Phenomenal Girl liaritone. 

Hayden and Hetherton, Comedy Eutertainers and Well- 
Known Laugh Proaucers. 

Olaciuta Uella Itocca, Celebrated Concert Violinist. 

Clorindy. or The Origin of the Cake Walk; 30 people. 

Papinta the Glorious, the Grand Spectacular Dancer. 



Jngkside floral Company & 

f. Bdward 6ray, p rop . 

140 South Spring St 

'I telephone Main 568. 

We grow all our flowers and plants at our 
Nurseries at Alhambra. 




PRICES never changing— 25c and 5Cc: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 



Three medals awarded at Hamburg Exposi- 
tion for GLADIOLUS and AMARYLLIS. Particu- 
lar description of these and other fine flower 
originated by us will be mailed on application. 




PICTURE, ukeUD 



Don't have your Kodak Finishing done by 
careless workmen. We give special attention to 
amateur work. 

C. C. Pierce, 1 13 ca. second st. 

NEW STOCK CONSTANTLY ARRIVING 




HAWLFY KING & CO., 



Cor. Broadway 

and Fifth Street 



POPULAR PRICES 



Although we aim to keep the 
best as well as the medium 
qualities, our prices are al- 
ways interesting to prudent 
buyers. 

DRESS GOODS, HOSIERY. CORSETS, 
SILKS. GLOVES, LINENS, Etc. 



Fixen Sc Co. 

136 south Spring; and '& 1 1 Wei) Second 



Cor. FIRST and 
SPRING STS. 



Cbc palace 

A Select Family Ke ort 

Patronized by the business men of the city with 
their families. Elegantly fitted, cool in Summer 
ami warm in Winter. The Berth Family Orchestra in 
attendance Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12 o'clock. Refilled music. No Vaudeville 
Itestaurant and Refreabmanta 
Last car Of the evening Id every direction and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Bapeolallj Adapted to 
After XticateT Partial 

Bernhard &. Schneider, Props. 




LADIES J> * 

llsve your freckles removed by using 

The Original Freckle Salve 

Prepared only by 

C. F. HEINZEMAN 

Obamlat 

"8 ,««„<Price 50 cts. 

North Main Street 



THE FINEST 

BON BONS 
and CHOCOLATES 





I I 7 So. Spring St. 



12 



Western Graphic 



CCUtb Our Boys at JManila 

CASUAL CRAYONS FROM MANILA 



CuARTEI. DB MeIsH', 

Manila, Dec. 18, 1898. 

HERE in Manila we observe that not only 
is the Spaniard unpopular with the 
Filipino in religious and political circles, but 
also with the heathean Chinee; who in turn is 
unpopular with all the world and no less so 
here than in America. 

The recent order that all Chinese immi- 
grants (many of whom claim to have been 
residents of this city prior to May 1st) and 
residents who have not already complied, 
"shall register," brought forth the announce- 
ment from the Consul "that the office will be 
open every day except barbarian holidays and 
Sundays." 

Had the Spaniards been in control, this 
notice would have been worded differently or 
swift and terrible punishment would have 
been meted out to Celestials for such a desecra- 
tion of the many Saints' Days observed in 
Manila. It seems like a parting taunt to their 
old enemies for many the clash these people 
had in the days agone. 

The recent arrival of the British steamer, 
Sung-Kiang with 803 Chinese and only 15 
Europeans shows how great is this undesir- 
able immigration and what an unequal con- 
test will be that of American competition 
with Chinese. It seems expedient then to 
modify the immigration laws in the Philip- 
pines to protect our own and the interests of 
Filipinos. This same Chinaman who hordes 
up every cent he gets never thinks of such a 
thing as conferring a benefit upon the public, 
oh no, he is a degenerated creature with the 
one object in view that of making money. He 
is peaceable and law abiding, but the the petty 
meanness, the filth and squalor that are his 
characteristics are by no means desirable ad. 
juncts in any community. 

Of late our friends the Filipinos have tak- 
en on a decidedly hostile attitude. Defenses 
have been strengthened, troops mobilized, and 
"activity" in every department of their army 
is the watch-word. 

So far as can be learned a demand was 
made by our Government immediately upon 
adjournment of the Peace Commissioners, 
"that all Spanish prisoners shall be turned 
over to the U. S. authorities." To this the 
Insurgents conceded, in so far as the sick sol- 
diers and civil prisoners are concerned, but 
the healthy military prisoners are still being 
retained. What will come of it is difficult to 
determine. Certain it is that our forces are 
on the alert. The :ird Artillery outposts have 
been doubled. The Nebraskans have pitched a 
permanent camp in the outskirts of the city 
and this will make a strong outpost. The 
14th Reg. Inf'ty. ,10th Penn , Colorados, and a 
battalion of the 20th Kansas have helped to 
strengthen the lines of defense. 

Brigadier General H. G. Otis has made 
several trips in company with our Command- 
ing Officer, Major Cobbe, to the outskirts and 
caused telegraphic communications to be es- 
tablished with all the outposts. For several 
days we have been carrying 100 rounds of 
ammunition, a ration of hard tack and coffee 
kept in the haversack and the canteen rilled 
with fresh water every evening. Everything 



is held in readiness to move at the first alarm. 

The Filipino officers present a striking con- 
trast to the many poverty stricken people of 
these isles. Doubtless the vanitv with which 
we must charge them is due in a larj.e meas- 
ure to the customs of the Spaniards whose 
dress they have largely copied. They have 
not yet learned the democratic simplicity of 
the Americans. As a proof of the importance 
of such a matter as "how many badges of in- 
signa, honor and caprice," the president may 
wear.and to what extent the Government shall 
bear the expense incurred by these items, we 
find that it is one of the important provisions 
set forth in the proclamation of the Philippine 
Republic. 

The officers make much of their patent 
leather boots with their silver stirrups, dress 
suits of the finest texture, and while their foot 
wear is of the best, the soldiers for the most 
part go barefoot. Non-commissioned officers 
wear red, white and blue, or imitation gold 
lace stripes on the lower end of the coat sleeve. 
In the commissioned ranks, 2nd lieutenants 
wear three silver stars, 1st lieutenant two sil- 
ver stars; captain, one silver star; the major, 
three gold stars; colonel,- two gold stars; and 
the general one gold star. 

A Nebraska boy unfortunately met death 
while attempting to swim across the Pasic riv- 
er with a number of his companions. Instead 
of swiming straight across, he took a diagonal 
course, when the cry for help came his com- 
panions were fully 200 yards away. Some 
passing boatmen might have saved him but 
the natives believed it a trick to make them 
draw near and then tip them as they had 
often done just for fun. The body was recov- 
ered and buried with military honors. 

At the Cavite Navy Yard hammers are 
busy, the merry ring of the anvil is heard all 
day. Raising and refitting sunken cruisers is 
the order of the day. Three vessels are now 
again afloat. They are the Isla de Cuba, Don 

Ben C. Tri man, Editor 

SPRING OF '99 EDITION 




The above miniature cover of the "Spring 
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in photo-chrome of a water color painting. 

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'Publishers 

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Tel. M 1053 Los Angeles, Cal. 



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Parents will find our illustrated CATALOGUE 
helpful In deciding; upon a school to which to 
send their sons. Mailed free upon application. 

! Los Angeles Military Academy 

Near Westlake Park. At terminus of Traction 
Line, Westlake Park. 

C. C. Emery, A. M., Principal, 

Walter R. Wheat Ma ager 



ELMS J 

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FURNITURE AND CARPETS $ 

WHEEL CHAIRS a 

Sold or Rented specialty yv 

Second Hand Good* Bought, Sold $ 
or Exchanged 
I. T. MAKTlN, 531-533 So. Spring SI. 




12 SHAVE TICKET $1.00 




HAIRCUT 15c 



SHAVE 10C 



Blue front | 
Barber $bop | 

Harry Woo li, Prop 

503 West Sixth St. 

LOS ANGELES 



CITY STEAM 

Carpet Cleaning 

WORKS. 

Laying, Kordering 
ami Befitting C a r- 
pet?, Furniture Pack- 
ing, Repairing <St Up-, 
holstering. Tel.M.427. 
JOHN BI>OK8KB 
Office, 456 S. Broadway 



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ULnl II LOU of any one not bo 



Western Graphic 



13 



Juan de Austria and Isla de Luzon. One has 
made a trip to Hong Kong and the others 
will soon be ready for their trial trip. 

Nowadays a great deal is being said about 
discharges. We have seen so many of our 
boys return home, that many have actually 
become homesick. Under Circular No. 40, 
the 3rd Artillery was given a chance to apply 
for discharges. The circular provides that 
applications made to the Adjutant General of 
the Army through proper military channels 
will be considered. Reason for discharge 
must be given. In the four batteries there 
were about 450 applications. Sergeant Major 
D. P. Quinlan says that in all probability 
they will get no further than Brigade Head- 
quarters. The reasons set forth in these ap- 
plications would fill a large volume of serio- 
comics. However, many are confident our 
discharges will be forthcoming on the ratifica- 
tion of the Treaty of Paris. 

The volunteers have organized a Philip- 
pine Development Association. As a pre- 
liminary measure, it was decided that a 
committee be appointed to secure general in- 
formation and data on these islands. The 



meeting was presided over by Major Sternberg 
of the Pay Department, who is very enthusi- 
astic in the movement. The major said the 
average soldier discharged here could invest 
$300 or $400 of his travel pay. With organ- 
ized capital a good work could be done. A 
number of the regular soldiers receive $800 
and $900 travel, and I have in mind an in- 
stance where a soldier of 28 years' service 
received $1000 travel pay. 

Fully 2100 Spanish prisoners have been 
returned to Spain. Thirteen hundred of these 
left a few days ago on the French steamer 
Cochimere. Several hundred prisoners, mostly 
invalided, have arrived here from Iloilo. The 
situation between the Spanish and insurgent 
forces is critical ; continual skirmishing is 
going on. The Visayano have proclaimed their 
republic and great praise is bestowed upon the 
American troops. Thus far the insurgents are 
making good progress against the Spaniards, 
who are anxiously awaiting the American 
troops. There are only about 800 troops in 
the trenches. The fact that the Iowa regiment 
have not yet disembarked lends color to the 
rumor that they w ill go to Iloilo. 



Los Angeles bovs in the Third Artillery 
who have been promoted are: H. Battery, 
Privates Chus. White and Alphonso Hamil- 
ton, to corporal; CI Battery, Privates Frank 
Coates and Van Norman, to sergeant; Privates 
McKenzie and Castallo, L Battery, to cor- 
poral. These are all deserving men and the 
good wishes of all go out to the new non coins. 

We have regular California fall weather, 
ami the climate at present does much to im- 
prove the sick and lessen the death rate. 
Many of the volunteers are loathe to leave be- 
hind them the excellent business opportunities 
that must present themselves as soon as we 
turn these swords into plowshares and prun- 
ing hooks. Very respectfully, 

Geo. J. Oden, 
Batterv H, 3rd Artillery, 
Manila, P.I. 

Cream, Cheese, Butter, Egps, Poultry. 
It is one of tne most convenient things in house- 
keeping to have these staples delivered fresh to your 
kitchen when you want them. T. Page Reeve, 548 
South Spring St. 

LEGAL BUSINESS 

Wo attend to your legal cases and make no charge 
if not successful. Our specialty is settling cases out 
of court. Hard collections collected. Advice free. 
Correspondence solicited. Langworthy Co., 220 So. 
Spring street, Los Angeles. 



♦ A. Sulphur SpnngS and Baths 



Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



& • ~»»> Cor. Macy and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. 

gj These Baths are recommended by the medical profession for the cure of 
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A. PTJISSEGTJB,, Proprietor MKS. L. LARIEUX, Manageress 



Bakery 

LEADVILLE BAKERY 

W. H Mayo, formerly at 82<i \V. Pico St., has re- 
moved to 546 S. Spring St. If not convenient 
for you to call on us at our now place, 'please 
leave your street and number so our wagon 
can stop at your home. 


Dental Parlors 

DR. FRANK STEVENS 

Open Evenings and Sundays. Electric light 

used evenings. Tel. Green 93 
324J South Spring St. • l.os Angeles 


Electrical Contractors 
W00DILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(incorporated) 
Electrical Supplies and Heating Appliances. We 
give special attention to Kepair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc.— 10s W. Third St. 

Telephone M ain lli">. 


Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fiue mas- 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair 
Goods of all kinds. Try Creme de Acacia 
Skin food. 224-226 W. Second St. 


Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Make fine halftones, line cuts, embossing plates, 
newspaper cuts— just any hing you want en- 
graved. See them at the Times Building, l.os 
Angeles. 


Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

327 So. Spring St are seliing the old reliable 
Hoffman and have added the Tribune (blue 
streak) to their line. Wheels from 825 00 up. 


Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULEY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker Magazine-, 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115% N. Main St., Los ANGELES 


Grillework 

JN0. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S. Hroadway. 


Kodak Supplies 

F. L DUNGAN 

The most complete Stock in Southern Califor- 
nia. First-ola'-s Developing and Finishing our 
Specialty. 307 W. Fourth St., near Broadway. 


Boots and Shoes 

H.C. BLANEY 

Boots and Snots for Ladies, Gents. Misses, Boys, 
Children, and Infants. Prices reasonable. 

352 S. Spring St. Los Angeles 


Real Estate 

" Muayne finds the bargains " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading Keal Kstate. Agents 

118 West Fourth St. - - LosAngei.es 


Business College 


226 So. Spring St., Los Angeles, Oal. In session 
all the year. Students enter any day. 


School of Shorthand 

The Great Shorthand Revolution 

Gregg's Light Line Shorthand 

Principles acquired in ten easy lessons. Students 
write 60 to 80 words a minute with five weeks' 
instruction. Institute 340>£ S Btoadwav. 


Carpet Cleaning: 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax. 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Rugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. 611 South Broadway. Phone M. 217 
Robt. JOBDAN 


Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon. Specialist for women 
Office hours : 9 to 12 M. 2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 

540% S. Spring St. Lot Anneli.- 


Dancing School 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL 

For Dancing 
The Glide system. A class will organize for be- 
ginners Wed. eve. Jan. 25. Residence 1022 S. 
Bonnie Bra°. Academy Sixth and Broadway, 
Illinois Hall, l.os Angeles Tel. Green 1291 


Trusses 

W. W. SWEENEY 

Expert maker and fitter of Trusses, Elastic Hos- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. i he only 
manufacturer in S. California. Rimcmbcr the 
number, 313 S. Spring St. Under Kamona 
Hotel. 

— 1 


Dermatologist 

JOSEPHINE R0DD0N 

Shampooing and scalp treatment Bust and 
neck development a specialty. Medicated 
baths. Facial treatment. Agent for Mrs. Nettle 
Harrison's goods. 321 West Fourth St. 


Undertakers 

BRESEE BROTHERS CO. 

Funeral Directors. Broadway and Sixth Sis. 
1 rival e Ambulance. Lady Assistant. The best 
service and the lowest prices. 

Tel. Main 243 - - Los As. .in- 


Druggist 

W. W. B0SWELL 

Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Toilet Articles, 
I'ancy Goods, Skins, Sponges, Brushes, Combs, 
Perfumery, Physicians' Prescriptions carefully 
compounded. Tel. G 1372. Fourth and Hill. 


Wood-Carpet 

JN0. A. SMITH 

$1.25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
Floors, Strip Moors, etc. Can tic laid equally 
well in new or old bouses. Cleanly, healthful 
and permanent. 707 K. Broadway. 



Oldest and Largest Bank in Southern 
California 



OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



CAPITAL (Paid up) 8500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total $1,426,742 



OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

Ci. H EI MANN Assistant Cashier 



DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry C. E. Thom A. Olassell 

O. W. Childs I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 

J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 

O-Speclal Collection Department. Oursafety 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent in its new fire and burglar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 



t Savings Kt 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts. 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

APITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits 
Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUE President 

I. N. VAN NUYS Vice-President 

B. V. DUQUE Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Kaspcr Colin, H. 
W. O'Melveuy, J. B. Lankershlm, (). T. Johnson, 
T. L. Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. O. KerckhofT, A. 
Haas. 

Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estat: in prohatc, Kcversloniry 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from $10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment on mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



NOTICi : OK FORECLOSURE SALE 

. Sheriff's Sale, No. 31,963. 

Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation), plaintiff, vs. Lizzie U. I'alton, 
defendant. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale. 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issued out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 20th day of January, 
A.D., 1899, in the above entitled action, where- 
in Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation) the above named plaintiff, 
obtained a judgment and decree of foreclosure 
and sale against Lizzie M. Dalton, defendant, on 
the 1 nth day of January, A. I). ",899. for the sum of 
Three Hundred and Forty-three <$t 10-100 (8343.10) 
Dollars, lawful money of the United States, 
which said decree was, on the 20th day of 
January, A. D 1899, recorded In Judgment 
Book R2 of said Court, at page 12, I am com- 
manded to sell all the certain lot, piece, or 
parcel of land situate, lying and being in the 
county of Los Angeles, state of California, and 
bounded and described as follows: 

Lot Number One (1), Block "A" of the Ninth 
Street Tract Extension, as per map recorded in 
Book ft.'), pages S9 and 90 of Miscellaneous Rec- 
ords of said county of Ix>s Angeles, together 
with the tenements, hereditament;! and appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging, or in any wise ap 
pertaining. 

Public notice isherebv given that on Tuesday, 
the 1 lib day of February. A. I). 1899. at 12 o'clock 
M of that day, in front of the Court House doot 
of the county of l.os Angeles, Broadway entrance, 
I will, in obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure aud sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with interest 
anil cost*, etc , to the highest and best bidder, 
for cash lawful inonev of the U, S. 

Dated this 20tb day'of January, 1890. 

W. A. HAMM EL. 
Sheriffof Los Angeles County 

By JOHN R. Sl.ATKK Deputy sheriff. 

Milh r A Brown, Attorneys for riaiuliil 



the J^osslyn 



Main Street opp. Post Office 

The finest equipped Hotel at Moderate 
rates in 

LOS ANGELES 

140 Elegant Rooms — with steam heat, 
telephones, hot and cold running water, 
and light and nir in every room. 

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70 sunny suits with private baths. Super- 
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Bat. ■ Am.rloan Plan M •<> M p6i day 

Itiitex Kuronenn Plan HI per day up 



Electric cars to depots and all points of interest 
Public and Private Parlors Orchestra music 
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A It N V. II L. BOBS, Prop. 



1 4 



Western Graphic 



XTbc Crown of the Valley 

Pasadena, Feb. 17, 1899. 

DEAREST BETTY:— The Lenten season 
is upon us and we girls have all made up 
our minds to devote ourselves to serious mat- 
ters. We all attended services Ash Wednes- 
day and some of the most bewitching Lenten 
costumes were in evidence. The prevailing 
mode of clinging skirts and plain bodices 
lends itself charmingly to nun like costumes 
in black or grey and when enlivened with 
huge bunches of violets and a little violet 
trimmed toque the effect is simply fetching on 
a devout maiden. I didn't notice. any sack- 
cloth and ashes. 

The final festivities of the ante-Lenten sea- 
son occurred Tuesday, the largest function 
being the reception given by Mrs. Presley C. 
Baker at her charming home on Orange Grove 
Avenue. As Mrs. Baker has quite as many 
friends among the society leaders of Los An- 
geles as in Pasadena the function was unusu- 
ally enjoyable as there was a large representa-. 
tion from both cities. The wide verandahs 
were enclosed with canvas and decorated with 
potted palms and foliage plants. Upon one 
of these porches Lowinsky's orchestra was 
stationed and furnished music at intervals 
during the reception hours. The interior dec- 
orations were in smilax, maidenhair ferns 
and Roman hyacinths, and were arranged un- 
der the supervision of Miss Tileson, one of 
Mrs. Baker's friends. The arrangement was 
unique and extremely tasteful. 

Mrs. Baker was assisted in receiving by 
Mrs. M. M. Mervin. Other unbonneted ladies 
were Mesdames C. D. Daggett, Norman Bridge, 
Theodore Coleman, B. M. Wotkyns. Mrs. C. 
F. Holder, Mrs. G. W. Stimson, Mrs. John B. 
Miller and Mrs. J. H. McBride presided over 
the chocolate and If a urns. The young ladies 
assisting were Misses Gardner, Wheeler, Mer- 
win, Daggett, Helen Daggett and Armstrong. 
More than three hundred guests were in and 
out during the afternoon. 

In the evening we all went to the Valen- 
tine dance at the Valley Hunt Club. 

The ball room was gaily ornamented with 
hearts and darts, cupids, bows and arrows and 
St. Valentine's color, red, was used conspicu- 
ously in all the decorations. The affair was 
matronized by Mefdames F. F. Rowland, C. 
P. Morehouse, Geo. H. Barker, C B. Scoville 
and Walter S. Wright. There were about 
sixty couples present and the evening was 
spent in dancing. Mr. and Mrs. Lefiingwell, 
who have recently gone to their ranch at Ful- 
lerton, after spending two weeks with Mrs. 
LefhngweH's parents here, were up for the oc- 
casion and Mrs. Leffingwell wore her wedding 
gown; and her bridesmaids, who were also 
present at the dance, wore their bridesmaids 
gowns which made the occasion especially 
festive. 

Dr. and Mrs. F. G. Rowland are entertain- 
ing Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Halsted who expect to 
take possession of their new home on Euclid 
avenue this month. 

Miss Kate Landt of Los Angeles was the 
guest of Miss Ruth Gardner Wednesday and 
Thursday of this week. 

We girls are going to devote some of our 
Lenten season to getting up an amusingcome- 
dy entitled "The Spinsters' Club." Miss Paul- 
ine Lutz is chief instigator of the affair and 
twenty of us girls are rehearsing. Miss Dag- 



gett has the leading part and has proved al- 
ready h6r ability in histrionic lines to fill the 
most difficult roles. 

Mrs. Henry Clay Durand gave a charming 
hearts party Thursday afternoon in honor of 
Miss Durand. There were thirty young ladies 
present and the favors were tiny heart-shaped 
boxes ornamented in water colors in a design 
of pepper berries. The prizes were also sug- 
gestive of hearts and appropriate to the game. 
Elaborate refreshments were served. 

There is nothing in prospect in the near 
future save a rumor of a swell luncheon to be 
given by the Misses Daggett in honor of their 
guest, Miss Clay. Phyllis. 

TRIBUTES OF POESY TO PAPINTA 

RHYMES FROM POETASTERS IN HONOR OF THE 
BEAUTIFUL " MYRIAD MIRROR " DANCER. 

SINCE time was young and beauty began 
to be, the hearts of poets, and others 
without that distinction, have thrilled with 
the sight of lovely woman, spangled with the 
gorgeous draperies of the East and wrapped 
in the sensuous mazes of the dance, pirouet- 
ting maybe as a primeval nymph or a latter 
day myriad dancer, as Papinta. 

One Herodias before a king won a tribute 
to her charms in the shape of a prophet's 
bloody head, given to her on a charger. Pa- 
pinta, the last of her race, takes hers out part- 
ly in fervid poems, dedicated to her by writers, 
east, west, north and south, whose muse has 
been stirred by a sight of the girl's enchant 
ing performances on the stage. 

Poems Papinta has by the score. Some 
are well written. Many trite. A few foolish. 
They have been pouring in on her from South- 
ern California poetasters since she began her 
present engagement at the Orpheum. A com- 
parison of these latest received with the 
rhymes of bardlings from elsewhere is not to 
the discredit of the songsmith. 

Papinta, of her collection, prizes most a 
few verses from Frank L. Stanton. They 
originally appeared in the Atlanta Constitu- 
tion, which for years has been enriched by 
Stanton's poetical gems. This poem on Pa- 
pinta will be found on our title page. 

Two years ago in Chicago Papinta had an 
admirer whose wheels revolved with the regu- 
larity of an eight day clock. Each day of 
the dancer's stay in the Windy City she re- 
ceived from her versifying friend a bit of al- 
leged poetry. On Monday, forini-lar.ee, Pa- 
pinta was able to take her toast, eggs and 
chocolate in the morning with this acrostic 
for a relish: 

Pu-est pearl of perfect pleasure, 
All the world ne'er held such treasure; 
Prettily dancirg dainty measure, 
If I could spend my days in dreaming. 
Not wide awake with worldly scheming. 
Then I would always dream of you 
And be content— if you but knew! 
Between soup and fish at dinner next day 
Papinta would enjoy the follow ing spectacular 
bit of poetical vintage, fresh from the brain 
heart of the Chicago bard: 
The lights are blazing. 

Papinta ! 
You are amazing, 
Papinta ! 

And you gather souls of people like a maiden gath- 
ers flowers; 

'Tis the fire dance you are doing, 
For your very life you're suing, 
Your form the flames are wooing, 
Papinta ! 
But you are human, 

Papinta ! 
A lovely woman, 
Papinta ! 



And your beauty always seems to me like roses after 
showers; 

On (he stage of life you're famous. 
We all love you -do you blame us ': 
There is no one quite the same as 
Papinta ! 

During the lull between courses next day 
Papinta could see in the following lines how 
she was slowly but surely driving the Chicago 
poet to faulty feet and risque similes: 

In the lightning of your eyes I shiver, 

Like many a man moie wise, I quiver. 

When you smile the whole world changes, 

You'd melt snow on mountain ranges; 

For you cowards would brave dangers, 
You, Papinta ! 

But when I see your phantom dancing, I tremble; 

I watch your lissome figure and dissemble; 

Such as you would win whole races; 

Do you play to hearts or faces ? 

Do you string souls on your laces? 
Y'ou, Papinta ! 

A San Francisco youth hit the lyre and 
brought forth this not unmusical refrain dedi- 
cated to Papinta: 

In the land of the ancient Pharaohs, in the realms of 

the golden fleece, 
In the august courts of the Ceasars, in the templed 

vales of Greece, 
Were dancers whom men applauded, and traveled 

from far to see 
As they swayed in measured cadeDce, or tripped in 

elfish glee. 

Maidens who danced like the houris, who roam the 

heavenly field — ■ 
Visions of rarest beauty, such as in dreams revealed. 
And they gathered rank and riches and precious gems 

and rings, 

And honors, and wreaths of laurel, and the priceless 
gift of kings. 

But greater than these now lives one who is famous 

upon our stage, 
Whose beauty, grace and charms excel all others of 

every age. 

The belle of all the dancing belles that the world has 

ever seen, 

The wonderful myriad dancer, Papinta, our own, our 
queen ! 

A North Cucamonga poetaster took his 
pen in hand and contributed this acrostic to 
Papinta's collection: 

Prismatic the colors in light out of gloom. 
Aglow with the radiance of star light aod moon, 
In folds of soft tissue her form stands revealed: 
Not Venus herself could compete in the field. 
Thought fleeting fails to describe her with calm, 
And sight is bewildered in sensuous charm. 
Once in Denver a man with the promising 
name of J. Emerson Smith saw Papinti and 
things happened at once. Within two hours 
of Papinta's departure from the stage she 
had received the following bit of fairly good 
verse : 

Oh the moonlight aglinting upon her hair. 

As she glides from the arms of the darkness there; 

And the violin's sigh as it softly singe. 

And the rose light trembles from out of the wings; 

And the orchestra laughs and sobs as with tears, 

As Papinta ! Papinta, the mystic appears. 

Oh, the music of faries— 

The tap of her feet — 

Was ever a melody from slipper so sweet ? 

'Twas from out of the east that a dancer came, 
Upborne on the rays of Aurora's flame, 
As the clouds roll back, and the stars pef-p out. 
And the French horns wake with a noisy shout — 
When out of the gloom to the kettle drums, 
Papinta ! Papinta, the dawn spirit comes ! 

And the rose on her breast 

How it breathes to her heart. 

Was there ever before secret told with such 
art ? 

Ay, the flame and the roses and the blue eyes aglow, 
As the lights flash forth and her draperies flow 
Like the thistle in summer, a cloud in the sky, 
A murmur — a bow, and the dancer sweeps by 
And the violin sobs and would fain play on, 
But Papinta ! Papinta, the mystic is gone! 
A smile and a bow 

And the clarionet's trill — 
But her foot steps, somehow. 

Are lingering still. 



Western Graphic 



15 



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GEORGE ZOBELEIN 

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Old Sonoma Zinfandel, very fine 40c D -al 

o-year- old Port 50c gal 

5 '' Sherry, Angelica & Muscat, 65c gal 

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Eastern shipments a specialty. 

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Wines in bottles, the 50c kind, 

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Good Whisky in bulk $190 gal 

Qnart Bottle of Fine Whisky 75c 



397-399 S. Los Angeles St 



4 



Tel. M. 919 
No bar in con- 
nection 
Free Delivery 



The Very Latest 

Wall Papers 

Three Carloads 



Walter Bros. 
627 so. spring street 

Tel. main 1055 



Creamery Building^ 



; Simon Maier! 



A NEW DEPARTURE 

IN CREAMERY CONSTRUCTION 
Write us for particulars.... 

Separators, Vats, Churns, or 

Anything you need 

To Make Butter or Cheese 
Spend one stamp on us. 

F. M. WILSON & CO. 

Selma, Clark Co., Ohio. 



i> Wholesale } 

t Butcher and 

^ Packer ^ 

J Telephone Main 155 J 

$ 149-151-153 N. Spring Street ^ 

* * 

Park Market 

CHAS. KKSTNKIt.-l'ropriilur 

The Choicest of Meats 



329 West Fifth St. 



Telephone Ke<l BSR 



WOOD! 



Also COAL Delivered • 



Nice Dry 
Oak and 
Juniper . . 



The "Spring of 9>>" Edition of Western 
Graphic will be an elaborate affair never 
before equalled in the United States. Cal- 
ifornia will be proud of the issue 



Black Hi i I 

Wellington 

Special Prices by the Carload 



#10.00 - 
810.50 a 



W. E. CLARK 



1248 SO. FIGUER0A • 



Tel - West 69 




"Our folks are not 
a bit afraid of 

POISON OAK 

or any skin disease. 
One 25 cent box or 
the Hexican Remedy- 
knocks it in one 
night " You can 
buy it of your drug- 
gist, or send to the 

Mexican Botanical Co. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Wanamaker & Brown (Philadelphia) 

Titchner & JaCObi (Rochester) 

JVIade to JYIeasure Suits,*? 

Every mote and fuzzis wool 
Wool and only wool 
Every thread wool 

Agency 325 South Broadway 

Call and see us or drop us a postal card and we wilt, send you samples or 
call upon you. Open .Saturday evenings. 

JEFFERY * JEFFERY, Agents., 325 So. Broadway 



free 

Delivery 



California 
Limited... 



Santa Fe 
Route 



The Fastest Regular Train Ever Run Across the Continent 



HAVE YOU NOTICED THE SCHEDULE? 



MAM TIM, I K UN* 



Leaves Los Aagelet 
Arrive* Denver - - 
Arrives Kansas City 

Arrives Chicago - - 



1.20 p.m. Mon. Wed. Sat. 



Arrives Omaha - 
Arrives St i Mis - 
5 00 p.m. Wed. Fri. Mon. Arrives Fort V. Mi 
9.10 p.m. Wed Fri. Mon. Arrives St Paul ■ 
9.. r >'> a.m. Thurs. Sat. Tucs. Arrives New York 
Arrives Hoston - • 



6.00 a. m. Thur. Sat. Tues. 
■ 7.00 a.m. Thnr. Hat. Tues. 
x.00 a.m. Thur. Sat. Tucs. 
7 00 p.m. Thur. Sat. Tues. 
1.80 p.m.' Fri. Sun. Wed. 
8.00 p.m. Fri. Sun. Wed. 



The California Limited is made up of the highest class of equipment, is lighted by electricity 
and carries composite and observation cars with every accommodation for ladles and gentlemen 
The Dining Car gives uneuualcd service. 

This splendid train is for first-class travel only, hut there is no extra charge beyond the regu 
lar ticket anil sleeping car rate an'' is In addition to the regular Dully OyitIhiiiI Kxpress 
which carries both Pullman Palace and tourist cars through to Chicago. 



B. K. OBEGOBY. Asst (icn'l Passenger Agt 
8. C. and S. Fe, P. roads, Los Angeles. 



JNO. J. BYKNB, (icn'l Passenger Agt. 

S. C and 8. Fe P. roads, Los Angeles 



HOTEL RflMONfl 

Los Angeles, Cal 



Most Central'y Located. First-class at Modem Rate 

Cor. Spring and Third Streets 

.F. B. MALLORY, Prop. 




E 



Oeufcv-^ ... *~ 

COMMODORE DEWEY AND HIS SQUADRON. 

The Asiatic -.yiadron, whicli did such effective »™k at Manila under the skilful 
direction id (".imiiiodore Dewey, is here represented as it was steaming rapidly 
toward tin. principal harbor of the Philippine' 



McCALL'S Patterns for March Now on Sale 




Gloves for Hen 

Standards of quality and style characterize our entire Glove 
stock. The advantage of buying Men's Gloves in a dry goods 
store must be obvious to those who have heretofore bought else- 
where. 

Saranac Working Gloves, 50c. 

Men's English Dogskin Driving and Business Gloves, shades 
of tan and terra cotta, pique stitch, made by Adler, $1.00. 

Men's Driving Gloves, special tan or selected goatskin, made 
by Adler, very extra quality, at $1 50. 

Men's Silk-Lined Reindeer Gloves, in shades of brown, $1.50. 

Reindeerskin Gloves for men, new shades of quaker, soft and 
flexible, splendid for street or driving, $1.75. 

Perrins' "400" Kid Gloves, $2.00. 

317=325 SOUTH BROADWAY 

Between Third and Fourth Street 



Semiannual Discount Sale 



^NUR Sixteenth Semi-Atinual Discount Call 
** now being held, bids fair to eclipse all for- 
mer efforts; as -ve have in stock many lots of elegant 
goods intended for our Holiday trade which arrived too 
late, these lines, as well as all other articles in our 
store, are marked down to prices that will be a delight- 
ful surprise so the ladies of this section. 

Don't fail to Attend this Sale 



H. F. VOLLMER & CO. 

116 South Spring Street. 



DIRECT 
IMPORTERS 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 




"It looks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury — white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 

m 

Our process has long since 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 

w 

Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & M0FFITT 



WENDELL EASTON 
President 



GEORGE EASTON 

Vice-President 



GEO. D. EASTON 

Secretary 



ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK 
Treasurer 



mOXtiOKlDGltC 

Estate Avitfrs 4 
GiMiMLJlvCT/OMfts 



1 



: 
: 



Be up to date and invest your money where it will bring quick 
returns. Invest in the most attractive part of the city, the 

MENLO PARK TRACT 

Large Lots. Streets Improved. Two Oar Lines, but twelve minutes 
from business center. Nobby homes building in every block. 

It will pay you to call on us. 

EASTON ELDRIDGE & Co. 



121 SOUTH BROADWAV 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Press of leo. Rice i Sons (Ino.,) 311 313 New Higb Street 



Western Graphic 



J ILLUSTRATED WEEKLY JOURNAL 
FOR SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 



COPY RIGHTED 199a 



Los Angeles, Saturday, February 25, 1899. 



Edition de Luxe 
10 Cents a Copy 




t 



A NATIVE ANGELENO, A TYPE OF CHILD BEAUTY 



Engraved by Mansard-Collier Co. 



2 



Western Graphic 



^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^> ^^^^^Jfe^^^^^ V 



m 

/IS 

$ 

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* 



Peerless wines 



i 

Of couise we realize that the awarding to our Wines, Gold Medals at Jfo 
iheOuiaha Exposition wan a just tribute to their Purity, Age and Strength, V/ 

and the unsolicited testimonials of V" 
hundreds of Physicians and others \f/ 
that have come to us are more 
than gratifying, we feel that if ^ 
everyone knew how excellent our ^iv 
vintages are, the demand would VJ. 
be doubled. In order that all v/ 
intending purchasers may becoi: 
acquainted with our wines, 




at all w 
ecotne \f/ 
B, we\|/ 

invite you to call and sample them at any time — WK SELL NO Winks y^j 

iuv dndhr Five Years Old. Hi 



Including one bottle 1888 Uiaudy. 

2 Cases Assorted Win s, XXXX - - $11.00 

Including two bottles is-n Uraudy and oue bottle Champagne. 



/j\ SPECIAL ORRER 

We will deliver free of freight charges to any railroad station in the United States 

jljfS 2 Cases Assorted Wines, XXX $ 9.00 

/ft 
/ft 

^Southern California Wine 

Tel. Main 332. 220 W. Fourth St., N< st Chamber Commerce. 



Co W 



FORMERLY GREATER LOS ANGELES 



Western Graphic 



Published Every Saturday Morning by 
GEO. RICE & SONS, (Incorporated) 

311-313 New High Street, 
Telephone Main 1053. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Entered at the postofficc in Lof Angeles as second-class mail matter. 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Two Dollars a Year in Advance, Pro Rata for Fractional Periods. Single 
Copies, Five Cents ; Edition de Luxe, Per Copy Ten Cents. 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

We Solicit Contributions of Short Stories and Articles of Interest about Southern 
California, which we will pay for at our regular rates. The usual 
rules regarding Anonymous Contributions and 
Rejected Mss. will be observed. 



Ifloum 



I 

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1 

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I 
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I 



Pictures, Frames ami Artists' Materials at a Biff Sacrifice. 

F_ _ r*f\ f% [n accordance with our usual custom, we are in the 

Ol «3vP UajS mun of our Great Clearance Sale for the purpose of 
CLOSING OUT all surplus p tock and short and broken lines. We do thU in order to 
make room for spring goods. Regular prices completely upset. You can SAVE SO 
I'ER CENT, now on some things. Liberal discounts on every article In stock. 

Twenty per cent, is what you can save on FIXTURE 
KKAMKS now at Liehtenberger's Gieat Clearance Sale- 
Have your Pictures Framed to order while this oppor- 
tunity lasts 



20 per cent 
Saved .... 



GREAT ANNUAL 



CLEARANCE SALE 



We Offer Some Great Values for Monday. Remember a Chance Lik: 
This Comes but Once a Year. 

On Picture Easels 50 per cent. On Framed Pictures 25 per cent. 

On Stock Frames 33 1-3 per cent. On Frames to Order 20 per cent. 

On Art Materials 10 percent. 

H. C. Lichtenberger 

ART EMPORIUM 

202 South Spring St. 



f 
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1 



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/IS 

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/IS 

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Railway 

Mag nif cent 
Panorama of 
Earth and Ocean 



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Grandest Trip 
on Earth 



A 



6cbo JVlountain Rouse 

SITl'ATEI) on the summit of Echo Mountain. 
3'i00 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartments 
with or without baths. Cuisine unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

Special 

Guests remaining one week or longer will be al- 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fate 
to Echo Mountain and return and a 50c round trip 
rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily if 
desired. 

Tickets and full information 
CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Traffic anil Kxcui'Hion Agent 

214 South Spring St. - - Los Angeles Cal. 
Tel. Main 960 



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/IS 

9 
/Is 

/♦s 

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Wilcox Building, 
e^t) <^t) c^t> c^t) <^t) • <^t) <^t) <^t> c^t)c^t>P 

Tufts' Electric Works 1 



«3 SK CKSSOK tO 

PALMER ELECTRIC WORKS 

701 South Main Street 




Every Thursday Seashore ^ 
Excursions til 



Will be Personally I AnO*P.f>* 
Conducted by the L«U£> rv 1 1 ^ C I 



Terminal Ry. 



To Terminal Island and Long Beach 

Leaving Pasadena 9:308.01 , Los Angeles ic.ooa in; 
stop of 45 minutes will be made at Long Beach. 

FARE FOR THE ROUND TRIP including AN 
Elaborate Dinner at Ye Terminal Tavern 
and seat in Drawing Room Car, $1.25 from Los 
Angeles and $1.50 from Pasadena. 

Full Particulars of W. N. GODBKK, Ticket Agent, Pasadena and 
Terminal Ticket Office. 214 So. Spting St , Los Angeles. 
S. B. IIy.nks, Gen. Mgr. T. C. Peck, Gen. Agent Pass. Dept. 



ISlGGtrlcal Repairing 

A. rm n ture Wind in i> 

Motors, Dynamos, 

and Switchboard 

A.p j m rn tus 

First=Class Machine Work 




JOHN Q. TUFTS, J« i 

Proprietor. 



Telephone 
Main 1570 



Trustee's Sale 



W. S. Allen's Stock of Furniture, 
Carpets aud Draperies — Entire Stock 
will be closed out at Reduced Prices. 

J. J. FAY, Jr., Trustee... 

345=347 South Spring 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



I!" Los Angeles, Saturday, February 25, 1899. T c [ 0 n n J 



Volume 
Number 




Western Graphic 




GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 



BEN. C. TRUMAN :- : :-: EDITOR. 




FIFTY years ago one of the greatest men of 
Massachusetts named Webster, and a 
man whom he owed money named Parkman, 
had an altercation over the matter, and in the 
heat of passion Webster seized a piece of grape 
vine that was upon a table near and struck 
Parkman over the head, killing him. All 
that could be done for the murderer by law 
and petition could not save him from the gal- 
lows. About the same time, in New Jersey, 
a wanton killer her lover because he had de- 
serted her for some cause or other, and she 
was convicted of murder in the second degree 
and sent to the penitentiary for life, where 
she remained until her death, a few years ago. 
But things have changed, and we are not pun- 
ishing for those little dramatic episodes now- 
adays. The girl of the town who kills her 
lover is not only not convicted, but the jury 
that acquits her disturb the sacredness of the 
jury chamber by their acclamations, and the 
man who goes after a debtor for a small bill 
and shoots him down in cold blood knows 
that he not only'cannot be convicted but that 
the jury that acquits him may have a'razzle 
dazzle over their conclusions in the jury 
room. If there does not come an awful finale 
to this reign of murder and subsequent bri 
bery and perjury and mockery of justice, one 
of these days, then we shall soon reach the 
conditions that precipitated the destruction of 
other nations that had deteriorated in morals 
correspondingly with their advancement in 
wealth, power and intellectuality. 

After nearly ten years of constant effort 
to secure a confederation of the Australian 
colonies a union has been effected under a 
constitution so very like our own that it is ex- 
ceedingly flattering to the United States that 
its plan of popular government has proved so 
attractive to one of the most progressive and 
intelligent peoples of the globe as to secure its 
adoption as their own system. The first 
assembly to consider union of the colonies 
that gave any promise of success was held in 
1890, which eventually resulted in a conven- 
tion called for the purpose of drafting a con- 
stitution. Such a document was drawn, but 
it was not satisfactory and nothing came of 
the attempt at federation. The main differ- 
ence between the colonies was upon the ques- 
tion of tariff, some of them having adopted 
protective duties on imports, while others had 
followed the British idea of free trade. The 
adherents of each theory claimed that the 
several colonies had prospered under their 
own plans and neither was willing to surren- 
der its adopted system. A unanimous agree- 
ment has at last been reached and the union 



of Australian states seems to be assured. 
With the exception of the governor, who is 
to be appointed by the crown, every essential 
feature of the new constitution is almost an 
exact duplicate of the federal document under 
which the United States Government is carried 
on. The colonies have six members of the 
senate each, who are elected for the term of 
six years, and the representatives of the lower 
house are chosen for three years. The gov- 
ernor-general has a cabinet composed of seven 
members, wielding nearly the same powers 
as the advisers of the President. It is sug- 
gested that the duplicating of the American 
ideas by so large a country as Australia 
should have an important effect upon those 
people of the Philippines, who are now de- 
bating between an independent rule and a 
protectorate under the government of this 
country. 

Whether or not the legislative fund of 
$30,000 foolishly expended by Mr. Grant in 
San Diego county will react as a purifying 
lesson to candidates in future, remains to be 
seen. But we get another object lesson from 
Connecticut, which state, like some others, 
compels by law all candidates for office to 
make sworn statements of all moneys in any- 
ways expended in a campaign and for what 
purposes said moneys were used. Under this 
law Gen. Hawley, who has been elected to the 
United States Senate from that state, has filed 
with the city clerk of Hartford a detailed 
account of his expenses in securing the elec- 
tion, which is commended to the attention of 
tho=e who favor cleaner methods in politics. 
His declaration is in these words: 

"Amount of disbursements, nothing." 

"Amount of expense, postage, not to ex- 
ceed $3." 

"Amount of contributions, nothing." 

"And I designated no person to act as my 
political agent." 

When it is remembered that Gen. Hawley 
did not have a "walk-away," but that there 
were other candidates who contested his elec- 
tion, it must be admitted that either politics 
in Connecticut is in a state of singular purity 
or else that the "corrupt practices" act is re- 
markably efficient in its workings. 

Gomez is almost as good a goody-goody as 
Brother Pasadena Simpson with that $3,000,- 
000 in view. But will he continue along that 
line after he gets hold of that neat little 
douceur? The treacherous little black devil 
Aguinaldo sold himself for a big sum to the 
Spaniards, but he failed to stay sold. "When 
the devil was sick the devil a saint would be, 
but when the devil got well the devil of a saint 
was he!" 

It begins to look as if Quay's trial of too 
much felonious "shaking of the plum tree" 
would reach him before the senatorship, as he 
is no nt arer the latter than he was two 
months ago and the bailiffs will be after him 
in a few weeks if he "don't watch out." 

Standard oil stock has been going down 
for several weeks, but we do not learn that 
there is any wolf as yet prowling round the 
door of John I). Rockefeller. 



le Luxe 
a Copy 



If the law had passed giving any aggrieved 
person the right to shoot any editor, every 
scribe in California would have been a moving 
arsenal and every editorial room would have 
looked like the Tower of London. Besides, it 
is a noteworthy fact that newspaper men 
themselves have never been rated as a tre- 
mendous slouch at the trigger. 

The reason that an Ohio man was not ap- 
pointed Librarian of Congress is because sta- 
tistics betray that at present the number of 
Ohio officeholders exactly corresponds with 
the adult male population of the Buckeye 
state. 



Some Protestant missionary is boasting 
that Aguinaldo has renounced his Catholic 
religion. Well, that is about as good a piece 
of luck as the Catholics have had out there in 
the Philippines. The wretch — Aguinaldo, 
not the Protestant missionary — don't seem to 
have set free any of the priests and nuns that 
he has had in dungeons and other filthy 
prisons for the past few years. 

They are talking of a gas trust in Chicago. 
Now, that is too thin, We are many years 
old and have never yet heard of a gas trust. 
It is "pay up" or "shut off" with all gas com 
panies. 

The rumor that Chapin of the Times has 
been suffering from an attack of grip is pre- 
mature. His ailment was due to his hasty 
perusal of the amendment to the anti-cartoon 
bill, and the thought that no more could he 
delineate the struggling hirsute ravelings of 
such caputs as C. P. Huntington's, J. Noonan 
Phillips's, et hoc genus homo, gave him a sort 
of functional derangement. But when the 
'steenth physician felt of his pulse and re- 
minded him that the g. o. p. elephant and 
the Tammany tiger were lift him his conval- 
escence became assured. 

That man Talbot who insisted on cutting 
the pension of old General Palmer, aged 
82, a man who has been Governor, United 
States Senator and Major General, from $100 
down to $50 per month, and that the old hero 
be paid in silver, is a scrub of the most loath- 
some kind and is not fit to carry offal to a 
hog. We would rather associate with a dirty 
drunken tramp than to be found in the com- 
pany of such a creature. 

It is just barely possible that the ursurper 
Reed is mounting too high a horse. At any 
rate he is getting himself very much disliked. 
And if it be true that be is crossing swords 
with President McKinley there won't be a 
grease spotof the Maine man left as the Presi- 
dent will be backed by the whole people. 
Reed's idea that he is the whole thing must 
be corrected. 

Paris is going to have a beauty show next 
month and three American women — Mrs. De 
la Mar and Mrs. George Law of New York 
and Mrs. Collins of Boston have decided to 
compete. Here is a sparkling opportunity 
for some Los Angeles lady to take advantage 
of a " sure thing. 



4 



Western Graphic 



DIVORCED ON THE DESERT 

OR 

The Vicissitudes of a Pioneer's Life 

A True Story of the Pacific Coast 



By Ben C. Truman 

Author of "Semi-Tropical California," "Occidental Sketches," "Homes 
and Happiness in California," "Tourists' Illustrated Guide," 
"Crescent City and Golden Gate," "History of the 
World's Fair in Chicago," The Field of Honor," 
See How It Spakkles," Etc., Etc. 

Copyrighted 1*99 by Geo. Kice A Sous 



gives this mountain peculiar characteristics not possessed by any other 
in California. Another grand view is had of it from the west on the 
trail from the Sacramento River to Castle Lake and the Castle Rocks. 
Here, after having crossed the Sacramento River on his horse, and 
climbed for three hours up the steep trail to an elevation of seven thou- 
sand feet, the traveler expects to find himself at least on a level with 
the forest base of Shasta. As he turns on the summit, before he ascends 
to the valley of Castle Lake, he finds himself humiliated, awed and 
subdued by the grand and mysterious mountain which seems to have 
come closer to him, as he rode away from it, and climbed with him and 
above him as he descended. He finds it looking down from above the 
clouds in its severe, calm, and cold grandeur, more stern, more solemn, 
and more imperious than it seemed from the valley below. One of the 
finest views is to be had from the southeast from the trail on the moun- 
tain above Horse shoe Bend on the McCloud river; but this is rarely 
seen except by the ardent salmon and trout angler and deer hunter, 
who find all the most beautiful and inspiring places in the wild recesses 
of California mountains. The views of Shasta by artists, and the 
copies in engravings, are ordinarily taken from Sisson's meadow in 
Strawberry Valley from a point twelve miles distant in an air line from 
the summit. The view shows the two volcanic cones, and has a fore- 
ground of meadow and forest of great beauty. 

The ascent of Shasta is not dangerous, but difficult and tediouF. 
Parties should not make the attempt without a guide who is familiar 
with the best trails. Starting on horseback at noon in July or August, 



CONTINUED FROM LAST WEEK 

^HASTA STANDS so isolated that the view from its summit is 
»v3 without doubt the most extensive to be had from any point in 
North America. Before the observer, looking to the south, lies the whole 
Sacramento Valley, with its rivers, towns, homesteads, orchards and 
grain fields. Standing in what seems to be the centre of the valley are 
the Marysville Buttes, looking like a cluster of islands in a sea of grain. 
It is said that on a clear day Mount Diablo, two hundred and forty-six 
miles distant, can be seen. To the southeast Lassen's peak, seventy- 
eight miles distant, lifts his crown of snow in full view among his 
brother peaks of the Sierra, head and shoulders above them all, like from Strawberry Valley, with a guide, food and blankets, the party at 
" Saul among his fellows." To the southwest, in plain view, are Mt. sunset will have reached the line at which all timber ceases. Here, 
St. John, Sanhedrim, and other peaks of the Coast Range, more than camping for the night, the horses are left. In the morning, at daylight, 

the slow and weary tramp on foot 
commences, over loose lava and 
ravines filled with snow, up an 
angle in places of forty-five degrees, 
for a distance of seven miles until 
the summit is reached. Above the 
timber line the air is so rarefied 
that the weary tourist can climb 
but a few steps before he is com- 
pelled to stop and rest. To per- 
sons of good health no other incon- 
venience is suffered than a severe 
headache, which attacks about 
three-fourths of all persons who 
make the ascent. The summit is 
reached in about eight hours from 
the camping place. Tourists usually 
remain on the summit for about an 
hour, viewing the scenery, exam, 
ining the solfataras, and exploring 
the heads of the glaciers. The de- 
scent to Strawberry Valley is made 
the same afternoon, long distances 
being passed over with great rapid- 
ity by sliding down the ravines on 

the frozen snow. 

Mount Shasta is now an extinct volcano, and contains no other 
evidence of its former activity than the hot sulphurous gases that are 
constantly rising from the solfataras near the highest peak. Immense 
volumes of water from its melting snows pass through the loose lava 
and find their way underground to burst forth in large springs at the 
base of the mountain, to create the rivers of which this mountain is the 
parent. One of these subterranean rivers, after a course of eighteen 
miles under the lava, finds its way to the top of a calcareous cliff on 
the bank of the Sacramento River, from which it falls a distance of one 
hundred feet in numerous cascades and small streams into a deep pool 
into the river below. Before the subterranean river comes to light it is 
divided into hundreds of small streams which are spread out like a fan 
for a distance of more than a fourth of a mile, but as the face of th« 
the grandest and most beautiful view can be had of it from the north in cliff is in the form of the interior of a semi-circle, the whole of the cas- 
Shasta Valley, at a distance of about thirty miles. From this point it cade is in full view of the beholder, who passes within a few feet of it 
appears to rise from a level plain and stand distinctly against the sky, upon the Oregon division of the Central Pacific Railroad. The unceas- 
dwarfing all other mountains within the range of vision. From this i n g spray from these cascades keeps the air cool, at midday, in the 
point it seems a vast" pyramid, its base clothed with forests, interspersed warmest season, while the constant moisture has filled the cliff behind 
with what seem to be vast meadows of the deepest green. Above these the falls with ferns and other plants that thrive only in a moist atmos- 
are other sweeps of trees and grasses and shrubs, up to what is called phere. This strange and beautiful spot is known as the Falls of the 




MOUNT SHASTA FROM STHAWBERRY VALLEY 

one hundred miles distant. To the west are Scott Mountain and the 
innumerable peaks of the Trinity Range, stretching away in a billowy 
sea of elevations to the Pacific Ocean. On the north can be seen, at the 
foot of the mountain, the peaceful Shasta Valley, with its farms ivnd 
houses, and Butte Valley, with its pretty lake and many thousands of 
acres of prairie still unoccupied and unvexed by plow. To the north- 
east lie the great lakes of Klamath, Rhett and Wright, the prairie lands 
of Oregon and the unnumbered and unnamed peaks of the Siskiyou 
Range in the same State. To the east are stretched out for fifty miles 
the dense and sombre pine forests of Pitt River and McCloud River 
valleys, the forests reaching up and clothing with a dark mantle the 
summits of the Sierra which bound the horizon in that direction. 

Mount Shasta may be seen from the plains near Chico, at a dis- 
tance in a direct line of one hundred and twenty-six miles. Probably 



the timber line, which seem to extend in a circle surrounding the moun- 
tain. Above the timber line, so far as can be seen' from the valley, all 
vegetation ceases; and above this line there seems to be nothing but 
vast cliffs of dark lava and ravines with ice and snow. This abrupt 
termination of verdure, and the sharp contrast of the lava and snow 



Sacramento. 

There are really two summits of Shasta, the highest of which is 
14,444 feet, and the other 13,242 feet. Besides the main craters there 
are at least 100 smaller ones, all inactive now, but from which at one 
time must have flowed great streams of lava, covering an area of nearly 



Western Graphic 



5 



5,000 square miles. Sheep Rocks, Castle Rocks and Cone .Mountain 
are objects of interest in the neighborhood of Shasta, the latter rising 
3,000 feet above the valley; also Shasta Soda Springs, containing a 
large percentage of iron and magnesia, and highly charged with car- 
bonic acid gas. There is no part of California more prolific of game and 
fish than the country about the base of Mount Shasta. Brown and 
cinnamon bear, the mule deer, and the deer of the coast range are found 
in abundance. The mountain grouse nest in the meadows, and are 
numerous on the higher elevations. The mountain sheep is occasion- 
ally shot among the lava cliffs near the summit. Both the Sacramento 
and McCloud rivers are filled with salmon and trout, the McCloud hav- 
ing two varieties of the latter. The forests are densely wooded with 
different varieties of oak, firs and pines, some of them of great interest 
to the botanist, because of their localized habitat. From the great 
abundance of game and fish, the green meadows, the running streams 
and brooks, the pine forests, lakes and mountains, grand scenery, the 
delightful and cool summer climate, Strawberry Valley, on the line of 
the Oregon division of the Central Pacific Railroad, is becoming a place 
of great resort, not only to tired residents of the cities and lower val- 
leys, but to botanists, geologists, and men of science, from different 
parts of the world, who may step into a sleeping car in the afternoon 
at San Francisco and take their breakfast the next morning in Straw- 
berry Valley, in full view of the monarch of the north. For many 
years the Shasta tourist stopped at Sisson's, the hunter's paradise, an 
old-fashioned, low house, with nooks and crooks and breezy verandas, 
all snugly nestled among the trees at the edge of a little meadow, green 
with grain, with great forests on all sides, and a mountain rising 11,000 
feet in front of it — a spot more lovely or grandly picturesque could 
hardly have been chosen. The genial landlord, Mr. J. H. Sisson, who 
had resided there from 1852 until his death only a few years ago, was 
an encyclopedia of information concerning the natural history of this 
region, and an invaluable aid to the hunter and fisherman who visited 
Mount Shasta and McCloud river during the summer months. Tour- 
ists now go to the Tavern of Castle Crag, the most perfect mountain 
hotel in California, managed by the famous Schonewald, so long the 
high priest of Del Monte. 

The best months to make the ascent of Shasta are during July and 
August. John Muir made the ascent once in November, but encoun- 
tered a terriffic snow storm. He slept in a hot sulphur bed in a crater 
until it was over, which kept him from freezing to death — and says of 
the scene following the storm: "A boundless wilderness of storm clouds 
of different age and ripeness were congregated over all the landscape 
for thousands of square miles, colored gray and purple, and pearl and 
glowing white, among which I seemed to be floating, while the cone of 




FALLS OP 'i HE SACRAMENTO RIVER 

Shasta, above, and the sky, was tranquil and full of the sun. It seemed 
not so much an ocean as a land of clouds, [undulating hill and dale, 
smooth purple plains, and silvery mountains of cumuli — range over 
range, nobly diversified with peaks and domes, with cool shadows be- 
tween, and with here and there a wild trunk canyon, smooth and 
rounded, as if ended by glaciers." In company with Mr. A. Roman, of 
San Francisco, I climbed to the summit of Shasta in 1867, and saw dis- 
tinctly all the high peaks, from the Washington group on the north to 
the Sierra peaks around Lake Tahoe, and the Coast Range peaks about 
San Francisco — a distance, on a direct line, of nearly eight hundred 
miles. Within the limits of this view, Sacramento Valley and the 
topography of the Sierra Nevada were revealed with wonderful distinct- 
ness. The air was as if purged and filtered, and presented only a 



slight gray film between the eye and the most distant object. There 
seemed to be no limit to the vision, except the convexity of the earth's 
surface. 

There is no such impressiveness to be felt anywhere as that which 
takes possession of the senses on the summit of a lofty mountain. 
Those immortal tablets of Moses never would have thundered forth his 
commands so terri Oically had he excavated them at the base of Sinai; 
Noah would have been rated only an indifferent navigator had mari- 
time fiction pictured him anchored in a plain ordinary gulch instead 
of balancing on the extreme top of Aararat; and his Satanic majesty 
understood his business when he took the lowly Nazarene up a high 
hill to enlist him in the carrying out of the most startling real estate 
operation of any time. 




MOSSBRAE FALLS, OR CATARACT.-* OF CASTLE CKAGS 



CHAPTER III. 

On the- evening of the fifth day after the episode at the intersection 
of the Lassen and Carson trails Mrs. Hathaway and her daughter, and 

all of the women 
of the party they 
had joined, ac- 
companied by a 
small number of 
men, including 
the guide here- 
tofore referred 
to, were in camp 
at a pretty place 
on the Johnson 
trail near Lake 
Tahoe, while the 
caravan proper 
had continued 
its way toward 
Placerville over 
the " old emi- 
grant road." The 
guide had in- 
formed the men 
of the party, up- 
on their arrival 
at the springs 
near Genoa, that 
there was a good 
trail over the 

mountains and along the southern margin of Tahoe, through to Placer- 
ville, and that the latter place could be reached, by saddle, in from four 
to five days, at least, in advance of th e wagons, which would have to 
go over the " old emigrant road." 

There were seventeen females in all, including Mrs. Hathaway and 
Janet, and twice that number of saddle horses and equipments, and it 
was therefore at once determined to send the women folks, accompanied 
be four men, including the guide, over the Johnson trail. It is this 
party that we find in camp upon the evening of the fifth day after the 
separation, on the margin of Lake Tahoe, near the mouth of the Little 
Truckee river. 

Mrs. Hathaway and Janet, before retiring that night, although 
they had entirely abandoned the hope of seeing the divorced one before 
reaching Sacramento, prayed audibly that nothing should befall Mr. 
Hathaway during his pilgrimage over the Lassen trail. Mrs. Hatha- 
way's last kiss, each evening, was imprinted on the companion bracelet 
of that in the possession of Andrew, and she began to conjure up talis- 
imanic reasons why the circumstance of each possessing a part of the 
precious heirloom should not be instrumental in bringing them to their 
senses and again together. 

And in this happy reflection she, who had been divorced on the 
desert less than a week before, passed into dreamland upon the margin 
of the fairest lake in the Sierra; for, folded in the mountain tops, like 
emeralds in their setting, and scattered elsewhere throughout the Gol- 
den State, are the gems of California scenery — its lakes; and, though 
their beautiful borders are not yet punctuated by cities and towns like 
those in Switzerland, or by villas and places like those in Italy, 
there are, nevertheless, quite a number of California lakes that combine 
both the ravishing beauty of the former and the impressive grandeur of 
the latter. 

Ranking all others in point of rare beauty and situation is Lake 
Tahoe. This magnificent sheet of water is twenty five miles in length, 
and in some places it is from twelve to fourteen miles in width. It has 
a depth of 1,700 feet, an altitude of (5,210 feet and is surrounded by 
mountains which tower above the lake from 2,000 to nearly 5,000 feet. 

TO RE CONTINUED 



I? 



Western Graphic 




.rage* 



Hbe Crown of the Valley 



Pasadena, Feb 24, 1899. 

DEAREST BETTY:— The social func- 
tions this week, which have been espec- 
ially noteworthy, have all been luncheons. 
We began with a swell buffet luncheon given 
Tuesday at Columbia Hill by the Misses Dag- 
gett in honor of their guest. Miss Clay. Miss 
Franc Bolt, who is one of this season's debu- 
tantes, also came in for a share of the honors. 
The affair was really one of the most delight- 
ful of the season. Of cour.-e one always says 
that, but this really was, you know. One 
thing that made it so unusally enjoyable was 
getting just the right people together, and 
then the guests were so lovely about helping 
entertain in an informal way. Miss Green 
and Miss Hall sang, Miss Carroll gave some 
violin numbers and Mrs. Lyman and Miss 
Coleman contributed forae piano music, all 
of which was charming. Another thing, the 
function was extremely picturesque, as the 
guests nearly all wore lovely dainty summer 
gowns and picture hats and the floral decora- 
tions in acacia and almond blossoms sug- 
gested springtime and general loveliness, so 
no one could imagine it was a midwinter 
affair. The ladies assisting were Mrs. C. B. 
Scoville, Mrs. F. S. Updegraff, Mrs. H. B. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Dudley Watson and Mrs. J. 
Grant Lyman, all among the prettiest young 
married ladies in town, and Misses Greb^ 
Cloud and Dodworth 

The second luncheon was even a more 
elaborate affair and was given by Mrs. J. 
Grant Lyman and her sister, Miss Anna 
Adams Brown, in honor of their guests, Mrs. 
Hartwell and Miss Clay. The guests upon 
this occasion were seated at small tables, 
which were exquisitely decorated with pink 
orchids and smilax. There were about thirty 
ladies present and the menu was replete with 
every imaginable delicacy. Tomorrow, Mrs. 
Thaddeus Lowe, Jr., gives a large luncheon, 
which will undoubtedly be an elegant affair 
and which we are all anticipating. 

No especial effort was made by the swag- 
ger set this year, so far as I have heard, to 
celebrate the birthday of the illustrious 
George, except a small card party given Wed- 
nesday evening by Mrs. Hampton L. Story of 
Altadena. Mr. and Mrs. Story entertained 
the Neighborhood Club, and on this occasion 
extended invitations to a few outsiders. The 
score cards and prizes were selected in refer- 
ence to Washington's birthday and suggested 
touching portions of the childhood history of 
the Father of his Country, being in the torm 
of little hatchets and closely connected with 
cherry trees. 

Dr. and Mrs. F. S. Updegraff gave a 
charming box party Tuesday evening at the 
opera house to a number of friends interested 
in finding out "Why Smith Left Home." The 
affair was in honor of Miss Clay and con- 
cluded with a dainty little supper at Dr and 
Mrs. Updegraff's, after the theater. The 
party included the Misses Daggett, Miss Clay, 
Rob Rowan, King Macomber, and John 
Daggett. 

Mrs. R. J. Dobbins and guests have been 
spending a week at Catalina and are now at 
Long Beach, where Miss Lillian Dobbins ia 
giving a house party at her handsome sum- 
mer home by the sea, which she has named 
The Kennel. 



Of course the great subject of interest dur- 
ing the week has been the announcement of 
Mrs. P. C. Baker and Robert J. Burdette 
Jessica says it is wonderful how many things 
people can find to say upon a subject which 
really was no surprise to any one and some- 
thing which seems eminently suitable and 
sensible from every point of view. But if we 
didn't make the most of every possible item of 
interest we would certainly dry up with the 
rest of the country and blow away. Every- 
one agrees upon one point, however, that the 
engagement is a subject of congratulation 
for both parties. 

We girls have been devoting more of our 
time to golf than usual lately, although the 
instructor at the Country Club does not flat- 
ter us into thinking that we are making much 
progress at the game. Jessica tried to worm 
a compliment out of him the other day and 
he admitted reluctantly he had c cached peo- 
ple who had a worse stroke than she. Our 
interest in the gime has been accelerated by 
the anxiom — almost tender — 3olicitudeof our 
men friends — club members. 

We girls were comparing notes the other 
day and discovered each and all had been the 
recipient of telephone messages of eager in- 
quiry as to how we were getting on and why 
we didn't stick to golf. Each of us was as- 
sured she had immense possibilities and en- 
couraged to persevere. 

It was truly touching and we were over- 
whelmed with the attention until Jessica 
spoiled it all by explaining that she- had dis- 
covered the clubmen had guaranteed that 
Country Club instructor so much each 
month. So as each girl pays her own fees 
for coaching it is adroit of the men to stimu- 
late her interest and thus reduce their bache- 
lor tax. How little real disinterested kindness 
there is in this world. Phyllis 





ALBERT ROSS 

AMONG the winter residents of Pasadena 
is a novelist who is believed to have had 
a larger vogue during the past eleven years 
p than any other American 
author, if, indeed, it has 
ever been surpassed in 
this country. Albert Ross 
was wholly unknown 
when, with his first book 
he achieved a place that 
undreds try for a life- 
time to reach in vain. 
After that everything 
was easy. Each new 
novel has an immense advance sale and as he 
generally writes two a year his position is en- 
viable. 

Mr. Ross began life in a newspaper office 
where he learned the art of condensation and 
of writing nothing with an element of dull- 
ness in it. Many criticise his methods, but 
the reading masses continue to applaud his 
work. The novelist is now in the forties and 
does not seem to be in the least spoiled by his 
financial success. He travels the greater part 
of the time seeing the world in a quiet fashion 
and locating new stories in the places he 
visits. 

After remaining in California during the 
winter and spring, Mr. Ross may goto Alaska 
and later will continue across the Pacific, 
touring the principal cities and reaching Paris 
in season for the exposition of 1900. Before 
leaving this vicinity it is his intention to paFS 
some time in Los Angeles, which he pronoun- 
ces the most beautiful city of its size he has 
ever visited. 

Spain once offered $25,000 for Aguinaldo's 
head, but that was before Uncle Sara had re 
duced its circumference. 



In the Gay Life 

MISS GENEVIEVE SMITH of South 
Flower street gave a charming lunch 
party on Tuesday complirtentary to Mrs. 
Willard Doran (nee Innes) and Mrs. Herbert 
Leroy Jones (nee Babcock) of Chicago. The 
colors used in the dining room were pink, pur- 
ple and green, the focus of decoration being a 
bowl of stately pink carnations and dainty 
violets placed on a mirror, with the smaller 
flowers and ferns scattered all about. Smilax 
and roses were on buffet and mantel and gold 
inscribed ribbons of pink and lavender were 
used as name cards. About the round table 
were gathered an aggregation of such beautiful 
young femininity as Mrs. William Garland, 
Mrs. Howard Bundrum, Mrs Fred Flint Jr., 
Mrs. Albert Cheney, matrons; Dorothy Groff, 
Lila and Helen Fairchild, Ada Patterson, 
Irene Stephens, Mary Babcock, Kate Landt, 
Florence Jones and Bertha Crouch, maids. 
With the guests of honor and the hostess, it 
was a veritable dream of fair women. 

Thd Misses Rowena and Marguerita Moore 
of South Figueroa street entertained the D. I. 
X. Sorority on Tuesday, the amusement of the 
afternoon being a progressive bicycle game. 
The decorations were in purple and green, the 
club colors, carried out in violets, ferns and 
potted palms, even the heart-shaped score 
cards being pictured in water colors with the 
favored flower and shade. About thirty guests 
were present and following the game.luncheon 
was served in the dining room. 

Miss Edna Bicknellof West Seventh street 
entertained some thirty young people with an 
informal dance and supper Saturday night, 
the members of the Lazy Men's Club all being 
present. Roses, lilies and smilax adorned the 
various rooms and added a touch of bright- 
ness. The same party will dine at Hotel 
Green, Pasadena, on March 3rd, and again at 
the home of Miss Belle Baker on March 
11th. 

The Tuesday Night Dancing Club met last 
evening at Kramer's Hall. 

Miss Anna Fay of West Adams street gave 
a tally-ho party to Pasadena, Baldwin's ranch 
and Oakwood on Washington's Birthday for 
the pleasure of her house guests Miss Ger- 
trude Feldher of Michigan and Miss Lillian 
Christie of Chicago. The chaperones were 
Mrs. C. B. Jones and Mrs. J. J. Fay, and the 
others on the coaches were the Misses Irene 
Stephens, Jette Thorn, Bird Chanslor, Lou 
Winder, Mae McCrae, and Messrs. Will Steph- 
ens, John Mott Jr., Robert Allen, Sam Has 
kins, Harry Van Dyke, David Brant and Wal- 
ter Chanslor. 

Mr. Warren Gilellen of South Main street 
had as hi? guests at dinner Tuesday evening 
the directors of the Broadway Bank. Covers 
were laid for fourteen and the table was hand- 
somely set with garnet carnations and maid- 
enhair in vases at either end, and in a low 
bowl in the center. The walls were hung with 
green and red and the flowers of the table 
were repeated on the buffet and about the 
room. De Lano's Orchestra furnished music 
during the evening. 

The Concordia Club substituted a hearts 
party for the vaudeville performance that was 
to have been given Tuesday evening, much to 
the disappointment of the members, as that 



Western Graphic 



is looked forward to as the star entertainment 
of the season, much unlooked for and previ- 
ously undeveloped talent always being dis- 
played on these occasions. At the game of 
cards Miss Etta Jacoby, Mrs. E. Behrendt, Mr. 
M. Felkhelder and Mr. Ralph Levy were 
awarded the prizes. 

Mrs. George Steckel and Miss Zara Dewey 
will be at home the first and second Tuesdays 
in March at the residence of the former on 
South Hope street. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Clark of West Twenty- 
third street have as their guests Dr. and Mrs. 
Homer C. Stuntz of San Francisco. 

Mrs Wilbur Parker and Miss Margaret 
Winston have returned from San Francisco 
where they went to attend the Mardi Gras 
ball on Shrove Tuesday. 

Mrs. J. Baruch entertained at whist un 
Wednesday afternoon at Kramer's Hall in 
honor of Mrs. M. Weiler and Miss Pauline 
Weiler, her mother and sister, who are visiting 
here from New York. Potted plants, palms 
and flags were used in the decoration of the 
room. 

Mrs. Homer Laughlin of Westlake avenue 
entertained at luncheon on Friday. 

Mrs. John E. Plater of the Baker block 
entertained informally at cards on Thursday 
afternoon, asking a dozen or more ladies to 
meet Mrs. M. L. Newhall of San Francisco. 
Following the game luncheon was served in 
the pretty apartments. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. L. Graves of South Fig- 
ueroa street gave a handsomely appointed 
dinner party on Thursday on which occasion 
their table was floraily beautified by a center- 
piece of pink carnations, fern? and ribbons 
and fringed with individual clusters of Eng- 
lish violets. The name cards were in pink 
and gold. The guests comprised Mr. and Mrs 
Dvvight Whiting, Mr. and Mrs. George J. 
Denis, Mr. and Mrs. Campbell-Johnson of 
Garvanza, Miss Stephens, Miss Thom, Miss 
Graves Wilhain Ennis, J. Mountjoy Cloud, 
W. S. Burnett. 

Miss Willard Stimson of South Figueroa 
street was the hostess at a dainty luncheon 
given on Thursday to meet Mrs. Beardsley of 
Michigan. The table was gay with the am- 
ber glory of narcissus, their coroneted heads 
rising amid a mist of ferns. There were as- 
sembled Mesdames John H. Norton, John T. 
Jones, E. T. Earl, T. J. Fleming, Victoria 
Harrell, W. B. Cline, F. M. Keffey, W. H. 
Holliday, W. A. Barber and J. W. McKinley. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. G. Cates of Orange Btreet 
entertained the Orange Street Whist Club on 
Thursday evening. Of the members and 
guests there were thirty-five present. The 
house had been elaborately decorated for the 
occasion, the reception hall in pink roses and 
carnations, the drawing and dining rooms in 
chrysanthemums, begonia blossoms and 
greens. 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY 



A SUBLIME DEMONSTRATION UNDER THE AUSPICES 
OF THE BLUE AND GRAY — MAGNIFICENT 
TESTIMONIAL TO THE HERO OF 
SANTIAGO 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY was cele- 
brated in Los Angeles in a way long 
to be remembered, under the auspices of the 
Blue and the Gray, which fraternal organiza- 
tion had a grand parade in the morning, a re- 
ception to General Shatter — the hero of San- 
tiago — a camp dinner at the pavilion, and 



afterwards exercises that lasted until evening, 
during which many fine speeches were made 
to a vast audience, and General Shafter gave 
a glowing history of the campaign in Cuba, 
which elicited enthusiastic approbation. Be- 
fore that vast multitude, more than one thou- 
sand of whom had fought all through the 
Civil War, the hearty old soldier of many 
campaigns told the history of the movement 
against Santiago, in a modest, straightfor- 
ward, vivid and impressive manner, and won 
the hearts of all by his charming and truth- 
ful presentation of much of the detail of the 
remarkable episode that commenced and 
ended fighting operations in Cuba. 

The Chamber of Commerce had arranged 
that its annual banquet be held on the even- 
ing of Washington's Birthday, and General 
Shafter was made the gue-t of the occasion. 
Again he told the stoiy of Santiago, which 
was a delightful epitome of one of the most 
remarkable campaigns of any time, and he 
told it with his characteristic modest}' but 
with an animation that was prompted by bis 
entrenchment among an avalanche of friends 
who know him well and appreciate him 
heartily for his great worth. He paid mag- 
nificent tributes to President McKinley, Gen- 
eral Wheeler and all the brave officers and 
men under him, and didn't even forget the 
patient mules that brought rations and am 
munition just in the nick of time. 

Splendid speeches were made by W. J. 
Hunsaker, Henry O'Melveny, Will A. Harris, 
J. S. Slauson, Hon. A. M. Stephens and others, 
the toastmaster being Burt Estes Howard, 
who is always charged with decorous felicity 
and charm of manner. The banquet hall 
had been beautifully decorated and there was 
music throughout the evening. There were 
many letters read, those from President Mc- 
Kinley, Governor Roosevelt, General Wheeler 
and C. P. Huntington each eliciting tremen- 
dous applause. 

The menu was the most perfect ever at- 
tempted in this city for the discussion of so 
many epicures — 238 in all — and shows what 
the renowned Jerry Illich can do when he has 
carte blanche. The outside cover of the menu 
card illustrated engravings of a ship passing 
through the Nicaragua Canal, a railway train 
speeding over the Salt Lake Railway, and 
ships at anchor behind the breakwater at San 
Pedro. On the obverse side of the cover was 
a picture of George Washington. The menu 
itself was as follows: 

Olives Celery Salami Tomatoes 
Salted almonds 
Blue Point oysters on half shell 
Green turtle soup 
Sauterne (Oresta Blanca) 
Boiled salmon, Shrimp sauce 

Potato croquettes 
Sweet bread pattes with truffles 
Claret (Mont Rouge) 
Fresh shrimp salad a la mayonaise 
Cardinal punch 
Bakersfield teal duck stuffed with celery 
Fresh green peas Asparagus 
Roast turkey with cranberry sauce 
Moet & Chandon (White Seal) 
Ice cream Macaroons Lady fingers 
Nuts Raisins Fruit 
Cheese Coffee Cigars 
White Rock Ozonate Lithia Water 
The Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion spent Washington's Birthday on Mount 
Lowe and the Landmarks Club visited the old 
mission at San Juan Capistrano and had a 
Spanish dinner in the to wn. 

Cream, Cheese, Butter, Ejjjfs, Poultry. 
It is one of tne moat convenient things in house- 
keeping to have these staples delivered fresh to your 
kitchen when you want them. T. Page Reeve, 548 
South Spring St. 



SOME COMPARISONS 

THE week of our Horse Show was the 
straightest bit of cold and uncomfortable 
weather we have remembered to have ever oc- 
curred here, and yet no one actually suffered 
from it and few (lowers and no fruit trees were 
killed by frost. But the news from all the 
other states in the Union told of unprecedent- 
edly cold weather, even away down through 
the Gulf States to the sea line the tempera- 
ture in many places in Florida and Alabama 
and Louisiana going down nearly to zero. 

The blizzard seems to have ranged with 
special severity along the coast and (iulf 
States, and from Baltimore to Jacksonville 
come detailed accounts that vary only in the 
degree of intense cold prevailing. Advices 
from Augusta, Ga , say that section experi- 
enced the coldest weather in fifty years. Mon- 
day morning at seven o'clock the signal office 
in that city reported the mercury 6 8 10 above 
zero. The mean temperature for three days 
was the lowest on record at the signal office. 
The Savannah river was filled with floating ice. 
It was the coldest weather on either side of 
the Savannah river in the memory of the old- 
est citizens. 

At Charleston, S. C, the freeze was one of 
the hardest ever known. The mercury in the 
upper part of the state marked from zero to 
eight below. Monday morning, Alfred Logan, 
a colored man of Abbeville, went to get wood 
and returning to the house fell dead from the 
effects of the cold. Robert Stevens, colored, 
aged nineteen, was found frozen to death near 
his home. The Charleston ponds were frozen 
over, also the rivers and creeks to Beaufort. 
The cabbage crop of the Sea Islands was 
killed. 

For the third successive day people 
throughout Florida shivered as they never 
did before. At Jacksonville the temperature 
began falling Friday night and Saturday 
morning reached thirty-two degrees as re- 
corded at the signal office and twenty-six by 
thermometers in exposed places. Saturday 
night was colder still and the thermometer 
recorded twenty-one degrees at the signal office 
and fifteen degrees in exposed places. 
Sunday night was also very cold and the ther- 
mometer Monday morning fell to twenty-two 
at the signal office and eighteen where exposed. 
High winds were blowing almost constantly 
during the three days, which greatly aggra- 
vated the effect of the cold. The temper- 
ature fell to fifteen at Fernandina Sunday to 
twenty at St. Augustine and is reported to 
have fallen to sixteen as far s.iuth as Tampa, 
on the Gulf coast. The damage done was 
less than would be expected from such a freeze 
but then there was not much fruit to damage. 
All oranges remaining on the trees were frozen 
and the lemon trees in northern Florida prob- 
ably killed to the surface of the ground, but, 
beyond losing their leaves, it is not believed 
that the orange trees are injured in the south- 
ern part of the state. 

Alabama felt the chilling blast along with 
her sister states and at Mobile the mercury, 
after lingering in the neighborhood of twenty- 
five degrees above zero, took a sudden drop to 
twelve, where it remained Monday, with no 
sign of moderating. At Louisville, Ky., the 
weather was extremely cold but clear. The 
temperature was about stationary. The ther- 
mometer registered seven degrees below zero. 
Considerable suffering is reported there and 
throughout the state. All over Louisiana it 
was bitter cold and freezing — so cold was it in 
New Orleans on Monday the 13th that the 
Mardi Gras festivities had to be postponed. 
Why, our Horse Show weather was a Brown's 
furnace compared to any of these polar visita- 
tions throughout the Sunny South. 



8 



Western Graphic 



SLAM BANG WHIZZ FIRE FIZZ SHR-RR! 

THE CHINESE NEW YEAR is passed, 
yet, in our American homes, we have 
erected altars to a heathen god, and still wor- 
ship at the shrine of the Sacred Lily of China. 
So anxious are our Mongolian servitors that 
the "devil shall not get us," that, long before 
the end of their year, they offer us bulbs of 
their favorite flower, and so just now, all over 
the city, there are blossoming the narcissus, 
blooming regardless of surroundings in 
cracked jar?, quaint bowls and rich Eastern 
potteries, a joy to all beholders. Creamy 
crowns of golden chaliced blosdoms amid the 
stiff spikes of green — how fragrant and beauti- 
ful they are! And so a foreign custom has 
sweetly ingratiated itself upon us. The slant- 
eyed orientals of Chinatown emblazon their 
section of the city with crimson posters of 
greeting and unfurl their three cornered si'ken 
Hags of yellow and black. The paper decora- 
tions of the houses are merely hieroglyphics to 
us, but even their sign language bears mes- 
sages of good will and rejoicing, for red is the 
good-luck color of the denizens of this quarter. 
Twinkling, swirling, blazing lanterns are 
swung and after nightfall firecrackers are set 
off to drive away the evil spirits whose power 
is supposed to be weakened by the explosion 
of gunpowder — more noise, greater quantity, 
and the spell is more surely broken for the 
ensuing year. 

Like us, they send out New Years' cards of 
greeting, their's always red and always with 
two addresses on the envelope, English and 
Chinese. And then they call and receive; 
offering rice, wine and sweetmeats to the visi- 
tors, the musically inclined giving ancient 
popular songs, wierdly accompanied by 
curious stringed instruments. Everyone pre- 
sents and receives gifts, old and young and 
rich and poor, and all bills are settled at 
New Year's. And in all this we bear a part, 
for their lily, the lily of Confucius, blooms in 
our homes, and is enshrined in our hearts. 
No house seems so humble but that at this 
season it does not boast a flowering bulb of 
the jonquil family. We do not thus grow the 
hyacinth, tuberose, crocus or tulip, and so 
probably if the beauties of the Chinese lily 
were not thus brought to our notice by the 
generosity of our despised alien, the Heathen 
Chinee, the possibilities and easy cultivation 
of the bulb, its quick springing into life amid 
a few pebbles or a handfull of sand, would 
still remain unpracticed. These queer people 
have taught us many things that we are slow- 
to acknowledge, but let us at least surrender 
them a full meed of praise for their introduc- 
tion of the Sacred Lily. They hang their 
crimson and gold banners on the outer walls 
in celebration, we also set out our manifesta- 
tions of gladness; for, lo! the bulb is burst, 
the shoots spring forth, the buds unfold and 
the waxen blossoms star the miniature gar- 
den; and thus we, American citizens, recog- 
nize the New Year of probably the oldest 
p?ople of the world. 

Among the many signs of coming prosperity 
is the fact that another decennial census will 
have to be taken next year, with the usual 
accompaniment of public snaps. 

The Leech Lake Indians threaten to go on 
the warpath again for the purpose of dem- 
onstrating that the white man has some bur- 
dens right here at home that it will not pay 
him to forget. 




SCHtb Our Boys at JMama 

CHRISTMAS IN THE PHILIPPINES— AND MANY 
OTHER MATTERS OF INTEREST 

Cl'AKTEL DK MKISSIC, 

Manila, Jan. 4, 1899. 

ENCLOSED find a description of Christmas 
among "our hoys" and other matters of 
interest. 

Times have been quite stirring since the 



SOMETHING ABOl'T CHRISTMAS IN MANILA 

Xmas has come and gone. Monday, De- 
cember 26th, was decreed a holiday and the 
soldiers did not have to drill. 

Christmas Eve in Manila, unlike the home 
cities, did not possess the bustle and stir of 
purchasers who with puzzled or smiling face 
were making selections. There was also ab- 
sent the many faces all aglow with expecta- 
tions of the morrow, as, mayhaps, they wended 
their way to the Xmas tree at the church. 

Here, in the land where the soldiers' amu- 
nition is law, there is a different picture. The 




PRKTENTIOrS DENIZENS OK OLK CHINESE QUARTER 



order from Washington to take possession. 
Xmas was quiet here but the die will soon be 
cast. What our friend (the Insurgents) will 
do we do not know. Some Nebraska boys 
told me a number came over to their camp 
(which is an outpost) to surrender but having 
no authority the Nebraskans did not receive 
them. We are anxious to have "it" settled, 
but at the same time there seems to be a 
mountain of work before us. 

New Years was uneventful, save for being 
"confined to quarters" on account of the In- 
surgent scare. Sports have been held in great 
numbers, occurring almost every day. Weath- 
er fine, health of army generally good. 



presentation of Xmas gifts is not so much in 
vogue here as at home. So we find the stores 
for the most part locked up, and little from 
outward appearance can we find anything 
which betokens that glad Xmas tide has 
come. 

In the evening many dwellings were lit up 
with Chinese and other tissue paper lanterns 
of a great variety of designs and made up of 
many colors of papers which diffused lights 
of many variations. Parades usually headed 
by a band of musicians, in which the lanterns 
were made to represent musical instruments, 
were numerous. As a rule a few civilians 
carrying lanterns (with pictures'of the victor- 



Western Graphic 



9 



ious Filipinos over the Spaniards) made up 
the parade. And to judge from popular sing- 
ing of songs of Aguinaldo, one would think 
it more of an independence day than Christ- 
mas tide. 

In many homes private gatherings were 
held and here the hand of welcome was ex- 
tended to such of the soldier boys as were 
known to the hosts. Singing, instrumental 
music, dancing (usually fancy tripping by 
some senorita) a light lunch, etc., usually 
made up the program. Their music is not so 
robust as ours, being more delicate in tone. 
The natives have already learned a large num- 
ber of our songs, which they play with sur- 
prising correctness, having no notes their ear 
is quick to catch a tune. 

Christmas (eve and day) was observed in 
all the churches with special services. Can- 
dles burned more brightly, music and rituals 
for the occasion were well rendered. At the 
various Catholic churches. Christian Com- 
mission tent and regimental places of worship 
appropriate services were held for the soldiers. 

At the camps the boys' faces beamed bright- 
er, having in store the promise of a dinner of 
turkey, cranberries, vegetables, pudding, pie, 
fruits, preserved and fresh, and coffee with 
cream. But this was not all. There were few, 
indeed, who had not been presented a Xmas 
box. And whose thoughts were pleasantly 
associated with those whose kindness and 
love had prompted them to send the soldier 
boys boxes. Long will Xmas in far away 
Manila live in the memory of the boys of the 
8th Army Corps. 

The first Protestant church in the Philip- 
pines has been founded by a Methodist mis- 
sionary of Seattle, Washington. 

The Filipino junta in Hong Kong has 
published the first English native paper un- 
der the name of "Echo." It will be carried 
on by the sanction of Aguinaldo. Herein 
will be set forth the aims and aspirations of 
the Filipinos. The natives, as has been re- 
marked, are very apt at learning. When we 
came to the city hardly any of the natives 
understood the English language. Now the 
six or more American publications have Fili- 
pina compositors. T hey have also a great 
proclivity for gambling and despite the fre- 
quent "hauls" and arrests they still take 
chances on being punished. 

The Isla de Luzon last week carried 629 
Spanish prisoners home to Spain. The 51st 
Iowa, one battery of the 6th Artil'ery and the 
18th Infantry have gone to Iloilo. This re- 
lieves us of any more speculation as to wheth- 
er we will go or not. When these troops ar- 
rive th*re will be great rejoicing as panic has 
reigned for some time. The Insurgents have 
been pressing the Spaniards so hard that it 
was considered advisable to abandon the city 
to save massacre. 

A NARROW ESCAPE FROM AN INSURGENT PRISON. 
HOW THREE OF OS WERE TAKEN CAPTIVE 
AND MARCHED AS PRISONERS TO THE 
FILIPINO GUARDHOUSE 

Since the recent scare nothing further has 
developed to lead us to conclude that the In- 
surgents are likely soon to precipitate hostil- 
ities. They are, however, none the less strict 
in the enforcement of their orders one of 
which provides that no Americans shall pass 
into their lines under arms. 

The incident which I am about to relate 
occurred while on outpost duty in the Mala- 
bon district, some two miles from our quar- 
ters. The country here in most places is cov- 
ered with dense thickets of bamboo, occasional 
swamps and rice fields. 



Together with F. B. Catron of "K" Bat- 
tery and H. O. Morgan of Battery "G M we 
started on patrol. Having already made two 
trips over a less extended route I acted as a 
guide. Leaving the Leper Hospital on our 
right we started north on the main road until 
the Pennsylvania outposts compelled us to 
turn back, having orders to pass no American 
soldiers without a pa3s. Retracing our steps 
for a short distance we took a path to the 
right and soon found ourselves alternately in 
thickets, swamps and rice fields. 

Skirting along the border of a rice field 
flooded with water we made our way north, 
intending to find a ridge or dyke on which to 
pass west. Finding ourselves again in a 
thicket we continued north until suddenly we 
came to an open space in full view of the In- 
surgent lines and not more than 100 yards 
distant. 

Seeing us, the alarm whistle was sounded, 
and the 300 yards of territory in full view 
soon filled with soldiers, ranging themselves 
in squads and then extending out into 
skirmish line. We could see them load their 
guns, and concluding we were not welcome 
we turned to go, but a shout caused us to turn 
and we saw that their position of "ready" was 
a threat not to retire. Then they motioned 
for us to come forward. After debating it for 
awhile it was thought best to advance. 
Slowly we came forward, and after having 
covered half the distance we turned again, 
but the shout3 and preparations of the soldiers 
were ominous indications of the Filipino sol- 
diers intentions. 

Reluctantly we lessened the distance be- 
tween us. After assurances of friendship we 
were ordered to "open chambers" to see if our 
rifies were loaded. Then we were informed 
that we would be marched to the Captain. 
So for headquarters we started. Intense ex- 
citement prevailed, and all along the line 
soldiers were "falling in" with loaded guns, 
cocked and bayonets fixed. Fortunately for 
us we were not doomed to spend the night in 
the "Calabaso." At the juncture of the road 
where we intended to turn north, three Amer- 
ican officers happened along and immediately 
they negotiated for our release. After telling 
our story to Major Mallory he in turn told the 
Insurgent officers in Spanish how we came to 
be their prisoners, and upon demand we were 
released. 

It is needless to say that by this time there 
were fifteen officers about and some 300 sol- 
diers. We were told to report at once to the 
officer of the day, Captain Randolph. Hear- 
ing our story, he assured us that it was all 
right and that the Insurgents had no business 
to hold us. 

From this experience these lessons were 
learned, viz: That henceforth never give an 
enemy a chance to bag you even though they 
profess neutrality. Again it must be admitted 
that despite the lack of discipline which the 
soldiers showed in so boylike a handling of a 
loaded gun, they showed themselves ready for 
an emergency. They also understfind helio- 
graphing and have improved very much gen- 
erally by observing us in war, and in daily 
drills and maneuvers. 

To account for the admission of the offi- 
cers into the lines without question, it must 
be noted that they carried no arms, and were 
at liberty to go where they choose. 

G force J. Oder, 
Battery "H," Third Artillery. 



A SAD ROMANCE— ISABELLA AND PEDRO 

[FROM THE PORTUGUESE OF CAM'FNs] 

THE last gleam of day was silvering the 
waters of the Gudalquiver, at the 
mouth of which stands the ancient city of 
Valencia, as the congregation was slowly de- 
parting from the Cathedral of St. Ceciilius. 
Among the last of the worshipers was a young 
female closely shrouded in a mantilla. In 
her hand she carried a fan of the most 
exquisite workmanship; behind her hobbled 
an old duenna, who with difficulty kept pace 
with the tripping feet of Donna Isabella, for 
such was the name of the maiden. Close by 
her Bide was a young and noble cavalier, 
whose deep, dark eye was riveted upon her, 
while ever and anon glances of recognition 
were exchanged between them, till at length 
the suspicion of the old lady was aroused, 
who, seizing the arm of her young charge, 
quitted her not until they reached a mansion 
in the neighborhood of the ever verdant Glo- 
rietta. 

Just as Donna Isabella was ascending the 
steps leading to her mansion she dropped her 
fan as if by accident. The opportunity was at 
once seized by the young cavalier, who, lifting 
it unseen by the duenna, slipped within its 
folds a billet, and, kneeling, presented it to 
the blushing damsel. 

"You will not fail to meet me as the note 
says?" he whispered beseechingly. "You 
understand ? " 

"I catch on with Simpsonian alacrity," 
exclaimed the maid, in sweet Sacramento 
accents. 

That night whan the bell of Miquilit tolled 
the midnight hour, Isabella^ stood in her bal- 
cony, which overhung the garden. A slight 
movement was soon heard among the orange 
foliage, and a tall figure, shrouded in a flow- 
ing mantle, advanced and stood beneath the 
balcony. 

" Are you ready? " asked the mask. 

" P. D. Q.," answered the maid in a breath 
that told of more than a crust of bread at the 
bottom of the salad bowl. 

The next moment she was in the arms of 
her lover. 

" Now then for the chapel of the neareet 
justice of the peace. Ere the sunlight falls 
upon the Alhambra (saloon) you will be 
mine." 

" That morn you will never see," cried a 
bold, bad man from the Santa Monica Canyon, 
who advanced from the umbrageous shrub- 
bery close by, and struck Pedro a powerful 
blow under the left ear. 

The unfortunate man sank senseless into 
the arms of his assailant, who bore him swiftly 
away. 

The next morning Donna Isabella was • 
buried in grief (and a percale wrapper). Cor- 
setless and with tear-stained cheeks she sought 
her mother. "They have taken my Pedro." 
she exclaimed, despairingly. " Who could 
have done it? " 

It must have been the ten spot or jack," 
responded Colonel Gaffey, who was standing 
near. " Nothing less could have taken it." 

A movement is on foot to have a play cen- 
sor in New York whose duty it shall be to 
prevent all indecent theatrical performances. 
It would be a good thing if he could have the 
power, also, to kill a few of the plays that are 
not worth producing. Still, most of these are 
included in the class first mentioned. 



10 



Western Graphic 





and the best wishes of thousands who love 
her girlishne88 and simplicity go with her. 



JJmusements 

MLLE. Rocca added to her previous 
success at the Orpheum this week with 
a well chosen program, and it should be very 
gratifying to the young woman to receive two 




MILTON NOBLES, nt the Orpheum 

and three recalls each performance. 

Joe Hayden is justly proud of the popu- 
larity of his song, "A Hot Time in the Old 
Town Tonight," and his new song, "When 
Dewey Comes H,ome," which his daughter, 
Ola Hayden, sings, will likely be whistled 
from Los Angeles to New York. Joe Hayden, 
with Queenie Hetherton, presented a sketch 
called "Matrimonial Absurdities," which was 
a series of bearded jokelets. The point of 
the whole thing only became evident at the 
last when he sang a song entitled, "The Jokes 
of Our Childhood." 

Milton Nobles does clever comedy work in 
"Why Walker Reformed," and is ably assisted 
by pretty and piquant Dolly Nobles. 

Quite the smoothest club swingers and 
jugglers in the business are Derenda and 
Breen. When in an act of this sort the per- 
formers so gain the audience's confidence that 
not the slightest apprehension is felt for the 
success of their tricks, perfection is assured. 

Papinta — that name is the equivalent of 
all the beautiful adjectives in the dictionary — 
is still the queen and almost nightly receives 
floral tokens from admirers who must needs 
admire at a respectful distance. 

The melodious, unique and gingery ' Clor- 
indy" combination as the last act on the bill, 
holds even the most obstinate rushers >'n their 
seats until the last bar of the final chorus. 



LISSOM, accomplished Janet Waldorf, 
has won her way to the hearts of more 
than one cynic and it is with sincere regret 
that we must now wish her god-speed on her 
projected trip to China and Australia. While 
this last week of her stay in Los Angeles may 
not have been as profitable as could be 
wished there was much improvement 
from an artistic standpoint that is 
undoubtedly a source of pride and 
gratification, to this studious young lady. 
Tonight in "Much Ado About Nothing," she 
will say good bye for perhaps several years, 




DOLLY NOBLES, at the Orpheum 

I DECLINE to say "Why Smith Left 
Home " because it is to gain that infor- 
mation that Angelenos are filling the Los 
Angeles theatre the last half of this week, 
though not a few anticipated the enjoyment of 
the comedy aB secondary to the pleasure 
of paying tribute to Jessie Conant, who 
comes to us a full fledged actress and with 
the same sweet voice with which she used to 
delight us when she was a Southern California 
girl. The comedy is clean and clever. There 
is not a broad construction possible in the 
whole play and those who like a good laugh 
or have an interest in Smith's troubles can be 
satisfied at the matinee this afternoon or this 
evening. 



Papinta stood among the flames 

And all about was red ; 
The fire flared round her beauteous form 

And rolled above her head ! 

A maiden in a loge turned pale 

And others betrayed fright; 
But all the bald heads cried "Dance on! 

Dance on, sweet girl, all night." 



MUSICAL MENTION 

THE concert given by "The Laughing 
Trio," consisting of Miss Ethel Graham, 
(soprano,) Miss Jennie Graham, (contralto,) 
and Mr. Walter Wren, (baritone) under the 
auspices of the Sons of St. George, Monday 
evening at Kramer's Hall, drew a large and 
appreciative audience. The trio were assisted 
by Miss Lucille Roberts, (pianist), Miss Eloise 
Lemon, (violinist) and that prince of accom- 
panists, Mr. Carlyle Petersilea. Miss Graham 
possesses a high bell-like soprano of much 
natural sweetness, and was heard to advan- 
tage in Arditi's celebrated waltz song, "II 
Baccio" and Bischoff's dainty "Bobolink." 
Miss Graham joined her sister, Miss Jennie, 
in two duetts; "Ye Banks and Braes of Bon- 
nie Doon," and "Cheerfulness," both selec- 
tions being sung with excellent taste and feel- 
ing. The numbers of "The Laughing Trio," 
call for a word of special commendation, The 
Gypsy Chorus, from Bohemian Girl, being 
delightfully rendered, as was Geibel's pretty 
lullaby, "Sleep Kentucky Babe." The music 
for this Trio has been specially arranged for 
them by Mr. Charles Ward, the pianist. Miss 



Lucille Roberts' selection, waltz by Wentaw- 
ski, was brilliantly played. At the conclu- 
sion of the program dancing was indulged in 

by the younger set. 

Los Angeles Theatre— If the steady stream of pur- 
chasers for seats may be used as a basis of calcula- 
tion, then large and brilliant audiences will greet the 
Bostonians upon their reappearance next Monday 
night at the Los Angeles theatre. This splendid 
light opera company, numbering nearly one hundred 
people, will appear in the following repertoire: On 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday nights Victor Her- 
bert's charming and graceful comic opera, "The 
Serenade;" on Tuesday and Saturday nights "Robin 
Hood;" on Thursday night and Saturday matinee 
" Rob Roy." "The Serenade" and "Robin Hood" 
need no second introduction to music lovers; the 
principal numbers of each opera have long since been 
taken up by the amateur and the graceful melodies of 
each are pleasantly remembered. " Rob Roy " will 
be sung on the nights above named, is the latest 
addition to the repertoire of this company, and its 
production by the Bostonians is eagerly awaited. It 
is said to be a worthy successor of " Robin Hood," 
written in Mr. DeKoven's best vein, and suggisting 
the beautiful and characteristic melody of the Scotch 
ballad. Each opera in the repertoire will be mounted 
with special scenery, costumed elaborately and given 
all the accessories of the modern stage. This year 
the Bostonians announce an exceptionally strong list 
of artists, noted among whom are such well known 
favorites as Henry Clay Barnabee, William Mac- 
Donald, Jessie Bartlett Davis, Helen Bertram, George 
Frothingham, William Broderick, William Lavin, 
Harry Brown, Josephine Bartlett, W. H. Fitzgerald, 
Lloyd Rand, Charles R. Hawley, Norman Crampton, 
Carolyn Daniels, Belle Chamberlin and others, sup- 
ported by a large and specially drilled chorus and 
orchestra under the baton of S. L. Studley. 



Orpheum — The lively comedy of racy order is to 
rule in the Orpheum's new bill for next week. There 
are a number of novelty actors that will make the 
program bright and breezy, and an all round brilliant 
performance is assured. There are eight acts on the 
bill. 

Prof. Macart's trained dogs and monkeys, giving 
a sensational series of tricks and canine feats, will be 
a strong attraction. Nothing to equal Macart's ag- 
gregation has ever been brought to the coast, more 
than twenty animals being included in the troupe. 

A team of gilt-edged Irish comedians, Conroy and 




WILL MARION, composer of "Cliiriudy", at the Orpheum 



Western Graphic' 



11 



McDonald, will delight those who love the rollicking 
humor of a really fine Irish fun maker. Their danc- 
ing is of the genuine "ould sod" brand. 

Schrode Brothers are German acrobatic clowns, 
direct from the Wintergarten in Berlin. Their work 
is of the highest class. 

Lang and Keeler, clever singers and dancers, have 
a prominent place on the bill. 

Milton and Dolly Nobles in "Why Walk-r Re- 
formed;" Derenda and Breen, the wonderful club 
swingers; Ola Hayden, the phenomenal girl baritone; 
and Joe Hayden with Queenie Hetherton, in a family 
sketch, complete the bill. 



Burbank— After a month's successful run in San 
Francisco, M. B. Leavitt's gorgeous and brilliant new 
production of the spectacular extravaganza, "Spider 
and Fly," will be 89en at the Burbank for one week, 
commencing Sunday night. It is said to be resplen- 
dent in scenic effects, beautiful costumes, catchy 
music and many new vaudeville features, with a big 
company of people, among whom are Miss Lilly 
Post, of late comic opera fame, and many other well 
known artists. 



Simpson Auditorium -Aside from the superb dis- 
cipline of the Sousa band and the excellenco of its 
ensemble playing is largely due to the fact that since 
its organization in the summer of 1892 there have 
been comparatively few changes in the personnel. 
Year in and year out the same instrumentalists have 
remained under "The March King's" direction, as- 
similating his ideas and rounding out and perfecting 
the artistic balance of the band. Sousa is now en- 
gaged in his fourth grand "ocean to ocean" concert 
tour during which he will pay a visit to Los Angeles 
and will give four concerts at Simpson Auditorium 
on March U and 15, two matinee and two evening 
performances. 

OUR SAN FRANCISCoTeTTER 

San Francisco, Feb. 21, 1899. 

LAST week society was in a quiver of ex- 
citement accompanying the festivities 
of the Mardi Gras ball; the step was but the 
one to that occasion of the bicycle races at the 
pavilion, where 12,000 people saw the finish 
of the six-day grind on Sunday night. At 
this writing we are looking forward with a 
tremor of expectation to the grand opera 
season, which will open on the 13th of March 
at the Grand Opera House, continuing for 
two weeks instead of three, as was originally 
expected. The Melba season has been so per- 
sistently heralded as a Melba season that it 
will be a Melba season after all; that is to 
say, there will be no Wagner. Modern opera 
will be represented only by the younger Ital- 
ians, in "Cavalleria Rusticana," "I Pagli- 
acci" and "La Boheme." Mr. Ellis had prom- 
ised us a season of Wagner, but when sick- 
ness became epidemic among hi3 German 
singers, contracts were abandoned and we 
may now look forward to a season of frivolity 
and fashion. 

Sympathy with "The Christian," and it 
might be said with the creed, though not 
necessarily so, seems to have brought to pub- 
lic attention the dramas of this nature, and 
we have this week Wilson Barrett's "The 
Sign of the Cross," presented by Wm. Greet's 
London Company, including Chas. Dalton. 
The other play houses have little to merit 
notice unless we find it at the Alcazar, which 
theater has an excellent stock company, and 
the cleanliness with which the management 
present their productions is worth notice, and 
reflects credit thereon. It might be noted 
here that Miss Gertrude Foster, who is well 
known in your city and who for a long time 
was leading lady at this theater, will leave 
shortly on a tour, playing a repertoire under 
the management of Thall and Belasco Miss 
Foster is at present visiting her mother, Airs. 
C. M. Mott, of Los Angeles. 

At the Tivoli we certainly have one of the 



most enjoyable and pleasant operas this city 
has seen for many months, "Madeleine or the 
Magic Kiss;" Miss Bernice Holmes of Los An- 
geles is leading contralto and a great favorite. 
I understand that the management is to fol- 
low in the footsteps of Morosco and remodel 
this theater throughout. 

Miss Mollie Adelia Brown ,of Los Angeles 
is in this city and vvili favor our music loving 
people with a concert in the near future. 

United States Marshal H. Z. Osborne, J. 
B. Lankershim, Judge C. N. Sterry and John 
W. Mitchell of Los Angeles, are registered at 
the Palace. 

General Manager W. J. Nevin of the South- 
ern California Railroad was in conference 
here Monday with the officials of the Valley 
road. He states that, if the conditions are 
favorable, the Valley road will be completed 
so as to make it possible for Santa Fe trains 
to be running to Point Richmond by Septem- 
ber 1st. L. M. G. 



Tiik Chicago man who was arrestfd for 
stealing two pocketfulls of coal to keep his 
family from freezing probably now realizes 
that he made a mistake in taking such a 
small amount. If he had walked off with 
the whole carload he might some day be the 
head of a great corporation. 




PD0t0= 

graphic 
Supplies 



tel. m. 1:91 



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£ Los Angeles, Cal. 
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OS ANGELES THEATER mSSto 



C. M. WOOD, and H. C. WY ATT, Lessees. 



One Week, commencing, Monday, February 'J7th 
Matinee Saturday 

THE POSTOPD^ 

In Repertoire 

Monday. Wednesday anil Friday "'hie Serenade;" Tuesday 
and Saturday "R< bin Hoon;" Thursday evening and Saturday 
Matii.ee "Bob Roy." 

ALL THE OLD FAVORITES 

Seats now on Sale. Prices 50c, $1 00, SI 50 aiid $1.00 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIRST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing Honday, Feb. 27. 

I*. of. Mac-art, Celebrated troupe of Dogsaud Monkeys 

Conroy & McDonald, Comedians, V01 alists, Dancers. 

Schrode Brothers, Acrobats and Pantomimists 

I. ant; & Keeler, Descriptive VocallBto nnd Comedians. 

Hilton and Dolly Noble*, pP'Scnting a Coined) 1 11 One Act, 
by Milton Nobles, entitled "Why Wnlker Reformed." 

Derenda and Isreen, Champion Double Club .Jugglers, Ori- 
ginators of Club Joggling on Pedestals. 

Ola Hayden, the Phenomenal (Mrl Baritone. 

Hajden and Ilel lierlon , Comedy Entertainers and Well- 
Known Laugh Producers. 




PRICES never changing— 25c and .Vc; Callery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday nnd Sunday; 2BC to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; children 10c any seat. 



URBANK THEATER 



Bi 
Main St., bet. Fifth and Sixth. Tel. M 1270 
C. A. SHAW, Lessee 

Sunday, Feb. iiTlli •lint <>n<- We eh 

THE GREAT BIG SHOW GRANDER THAN EVER 
The new production of M. B Leavitt's Gorgeous Spectacular 
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Matchless chorus of Sixteen Beautiful Girls. 
The new hits in Follies and Fancies Yankee Doodle Boys; 
The Widow Brown; Throw Ein Down. Dewey: The Domestics of 
the 1 alace; Sousa Vivandiere Band; The Mermaid's Reverie; 
The Chefs of the Occidental. 



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their families. Elegantly fitted, ccd in Summer 
and warm In Winter. The Berth Family Orchestra in 
attendance Free concert every evening from 8 to 
12 o'clock. Refined music. No Vaudeville 
ltestaurant and Refreshments 
Last car of the evening in every direction and for 
Pasadena passes the door. 

Especially Adapted to 
After Theater Parties 

Bernhard & Schneider, Props. 



POPULAR PRICES 



Although we aim to keep the 
best as well as the medium 
qualities, our prices are al- 
ways interesting to prudent 
buyers. 

DRESS GOODS, HOSIERY, CORSETS, 
SILKS, GLOVES, L'NENS, Etc. 



Fixen 3c Co. 

South Spring and 2 1 I We«*l Second 




Pi 



Quito uKE 



Kin-hank Prices -\f>, 25, 35, 50, 75, $1. Matinee, 10, 25 



Don't lla ve your Kodak Finishing done by 

careless workmen. We give special attention to 
amateur work. 

C. C. PUrCC, 1 13 CO. Second St. 



12 



Western Graphic 



SOME REMINISCENCES 

AN old letter, whose characters are weirdly 
cabalistic, calls to mind a story of 
Horace Greeley, whose name is (-crawled 
thereto, which I think has never been pub- 
lished. Mr. Greeley when very much excited 
had a peculiar whining falsetto drawl and his 
profanity was something awful. One day the 
citv editor engaged a new reporter whose nat- 
ural voice was the very counterpart of Mr. 
Greeley's falsetto. He was sent to report the 
proceedings of a Republican meeting, which 
was held on Eighth avenue, near the upper 
end of Central Park. It was late when he 
turned in his copy, and it was put in the form 
without being read in proof. The next morn- 
ing's paper displayed, in a very conspicuous 
position, a half column article which caused 
the chief editor to fairly gnash his teeth with 
rage. The new reporter had written a faith- 
ful report of the proceedings, which wound up 
in a regular knockdown and dragout. Mr. 
Greeley hurried to the Tribune office and sum- 
moned the city editor. 

"Shanks,'' he cried, "who reported that 
meeting last night?" 

The city editor consulted his assig nment 
book and gave the name of the new reporter. 

"Send him to me at once," shrieked Mr. 
Greeley, in his shrillest falsetto. 

When the reporter appeared Mr. Greeley 
had worked himself into a fine frenzy and 
seizing the astonished young man by the arm 
he cursed until the air was blue. 

" What did you do it for? " he demanded 
at lasl, in his squeakiest voice. " Didn't you 
know it was a Republican meeting you were 
reporting? " 

" Yes, sir," answered the new reporter in 
his natural voice, which was a veritable echo 
of the great editor's, " but I thought you 
wanted an honest report." 

For an instant Mr. Greeley regarded him, 
his face purple with astonishment and rage. 
Then starting suddenly forward he cried, in 
deep bass tones: 

" Damn it, young man, are you mimicking 
me ? " 

The reporter explained that a shrill, 
squeaky treble was his natural voice and Mr. 
Greeley dismissed him, with a caution to be 
more careful in future about " honestly re- 
porting" Republican meetings that broke up 
in a row. 



" I'll ask General Schenck.'' The latter could 
throw no light upon the question. Milroy 
was the next to enter a plea of " not guilty." 
Hooker made a very emphatic disclaimer of 
all responsibility. Then the President assem- 
bled the four generals before him and said: 
"Gentlemen, Harper's Ferry was surrendered, 
and none of you, it seems, was responsible. I 
am very anxious to discover the man who is." 
After striding across the room several times 
the President suddenly threw up his bowed 
head and exclaimed: "I have it; I know 
who is responsible." " Who, Mr. President, 
who is it?" asked the distinguished quartet. 
" Gentlemen," said the President, with a 
meaning twinkle in his eye, "General Lee is 
the man." 



The world likes and admires frankness 
and posi.ivene88 of character. These are 
qualities strongly characteristic of General 
Grant. General Frank Blair used to tell a 
story that when he was a candidate for Con- 
gress previous to the war he visited a country 
court green, and there he saw sitting on a 
fence Captain Grant and others, whittling 
sticks; and near by was an old fellow with a 
jug of whiskey and a tin cup. General Blair 
said he bought the contents of the jug and 
invited Captain Grant and his friends to take 
a drink. Grant said, " I will take a drink 
with you, Mr. Blair; but I must tell you he- 
fore doing so that I will not vote for you. I 
cannot vote for any Freesoiler for Congress. I 
intend to vote for Dick Barrett." The drink 
was then taken, the election came, and Bar- 
rett's majority was one hundred and twenty. 



After Lee had taken Harper's Ferry the 
President determined to fix the responsibility 
for the loss of the important position. Hal- 
leck was summoned, but did not know where 
the blame lay. "Very well," said Lincoln, 



I spent several days with General Loring 
in Florida some years ago (1881) and found 
him one of the most hearty and agreeable 
gentlemen I have ever met. General Loring 
commanded the regiment of mounted riflemen 
in the war with Mexico, and with his regiment 
was "the first to enter the Mexican batteries 
at Chapullepec on the side next the capitol, 
and, though without orders, he led the fighting 
on the causeway from that point to the Belen 
Gate, where be received a wound that necessi- 
tated the amputation of his left arm," In 
1848 the citizens of Appalachicola, Fla., pre- 
sented him with a sword on the blade of which 
was engraved the words addressed by General 
Scott to the rifle regiment at the battle of 
Chapultepec: "Brave Rifles, you have gone 
through fire and blood and come out steel." 
At the breaking out of the civil war Gen. 
Loring resigned his commission of Colonel in 
the United Stales army and was appointed 
brigadier general in the Confederate army, 
and later rose to be major general. In 1869 
he accepted service in the army of the Khedive 
of Egypt, as Liwa Pasha, or general of bri- 
gade, and a few years later he was promoted 
Firik, or general of division, and was decor- 
ated by the Khedive with the Imperial Order 
of the Osmariah. Gen. Loring returned to 
the United States in 1879, and died in New 
York City, Dec. 30, 1886, much lamented by 
all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. 



Olatcbes, Clocks »»* "Jewelry 

C.ircfully Repaired and Warranted 



Telephone 
...M 1159 



S* Conradi 

Optician, SQatcbmaRcr 

It Hnd ft 

Icwclcr. 



fune Diamond Setting 

H Specialty... 



1 13 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



A choice asiortment of Diamonds, Jewelry and Watches 
always on hand. 



mi 

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NEW LOCATION 



STOLL & THAYER CO. 

BOOKSELLERS 
STATIONERS 
and ENGRAVERS 



253-'-J54 S. Spring St. 

Btlmaon Block 



LOS AXIiKI.KS 
Tholie Main 049 



The Liberty Bell, so often apostrophized by 
orators, has its antithesis in Louisiana. This 
is the old Slave bell that for many years 
caMed to work the 150 slaves on the Fontaine- 
bleu sugar plantation. This plantation was 
one of those princely domains of the earlier 
planters of Louisiana. It fronted on Lake 
Pontchartrain, having a water frontage of 
nine miles. The original proprietor of the 
Fontainebleu plantation was Mr. Bernard de 
Mariginy, a loyal French settler of Louisiana 
who, on the occasion of the visit of Louis 
Philippe to this country, entertained him 
right royally at his plantation, and was in 
turn received by his imperial guest at the 
Court of France with distinguished honors. 
The bell was cast in 1825, and tradition says 
that Mr. Mariginy, standing over the large 
cauldron filled with molten metal, dropped 
therein 1000 Spanish silver dollars to give to 
the hell a clear and silvery tone. Three 
French inscriptions are on the bell. At the 
top is the legend, "_/' ' apfrartieus a Monsieur 
Bernard de Mariginy" while other inscrip- 
tions specify the time and place of sounding. 
One striking point of resemblance between 
the "Slave bell'' and the Liberty bell is the 
fact that ( ach has a fissure in the side. Con- 



HALT! 



Tlwre i- li 




Military Boardino 
School. 



In Southern California 

Mental Boys 
Physical and Made 
Military Training Manly 

Parents will find our illustrated CATALOGUE 
helpful in deciding upon a school to which to 
send their sons. Mailed free upon application. 

Los Angeles Military Academy 

Near Westlake Park. At terminus of Traction 
Line, Westlake Park. 

C. C. Emery, A. M., Principal, 

Walter K. Wheat Ma ager 




ELMS 



Detective 
flaency 



Will undertake all legitimate Detective work intrusted 
to it bj Kailronds or Corporations, lianks, Mer- 
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Special facilities for ojieratiiiK in the East and abroad 

Very best of reterences ■ D r i ... _ .... 

Tel. Mai,. 5 is <J"0. P. Elms, Principal 

Rooms 1 12-1 13-142 Wilson Block, Los Angeles 



V*> „ FURNITURE AND CARPETS f 

WHEEL CHAIRS a 

Sold or Rented specialty W 

1 

Second Hand Good* Bought, Sold / 
or Exchanged 
I. T. MARTIN, 531-533 So. Spring St. 

12 SHAVE TICKET $1.00 HAIRCUT ISC ^ 

—> SHAVE 10C f 
9l 

Blue front 1 

I 





Barber Shop i 

Harry Woods, Prop ^ 

503 West Sixth St. * 
LOS ANGELES * 



CITY STEAM 

Carpet Cleaning 

WORKS. 

Laying, Bordering 
and Betitting C a r- 
paU, Furniture Pack- 
ing, Repairing & Up-, 
bolstering. Tel.M 4'27. 
JOHN BI.oknm: 
Office. 4 r i6 S. Broadway 



(lF&FNF^ The Im&^SStfSf&Sift 

ULnl IlLUU of any one not BORN 'Imf. Invisible In the 

Ear, causing no discomfort. It is to the Ear what glasses are to 
the Eve. Send for pamphlet, mailed FREE. Tells how to re- 
store lost bearing, prevent dealness, and enable auy-O II Q TR 
one to bear the faintest sound. Address, L II K r II 

F. F. FINLAY, 629 Ellis St.. San Francisco" 




Western Graphic 



i;; 



cerning the fissure in the Slave bell a pretty 
legend is related. The bell stood in the cen- 
ter of the plantation and was pealed to sum- 
mon the force of slaves to and from their 
work. Early in the morning its clanging 
roused the tenants of the quarters to their 
daily tasks, and at eventide its silvery notes 
were borne on the soft breezes to the most 
distant corners of the great plantation. At 
the sound of its evening peal the army of 
blacks, worn with their day's labor, would 
come trooping back to the rows of cabins that 
formed the quarters. A right welcome sound 
it was to those dusky toilers, and they learned 
to love the bell and to repeat tales of its won- 
drous purity of tone and far-reaching sound. 
It is a tradition cherished by these former 
slaves who daily obeyed the bell's behest, that 
on that morning when President Lincoln pro- 
claimed emancipation and freedom for all, the 
bell fell from its lofty pedestal and rent that 
fissure in its side which now silences it. Its 
power gone, with none to obey its behests, the 
bell chose perpetual silence to impotent peal- 
ing, and now is but a mute memorial of a 
by-gone power. B. C. T. 



Even in Boston and other Eastern cities 
where there is semi-Puritanic surveillance on 
the " Lord's Day," a keeper of a first-class 
hotel or restaurant may serve his guests with 
drinkables such as they like at their meals or 
in their rooms and not such as Keeley Cure 
reformers, prohibition cranks and aldermanic 
demagogues prescribe. There have been more 
attempted good things knocked out in this 
city by extreme measures than in any other 
city in the Union — the bitching ordinance 
was made useless by its radical purposes, and 
license moneys have been lost away up in the 
thousands by extra-official blunders. The 
idea that a gentleman stopping at the Van 
Nuys, or other hotel, cannot get an appetizer 
or a stimulant, and is compelled to seek a 
clandestine entrance of some neighboring 
saloon rr go out to Agricultural Park for 
such, is mean and pitiful. Here we get up a 
horse show and entice strangers to our hotels, 
and send them to their lodgings half frozen 
to death and deny them a stimulant unless 
they buy enough to get drunk on, while we 
hurry to our cosy homes and thaw out on hot 
punches and T. and J's. It isn't fair, it isn't 



hospitable, and it isn't nice. There is another 
phase: — the traveler is from all parts of the 
world, and should not be ill treated on account 
of local crankism. Even President Hayes, at 
his White House dinners, set wines before all 
foreigners, because it was their temperate 
custom to take wines with all their meals. 
Again, why should the first-class hotel and 
restaurant be placed on a level with the low 
groggery and dive? 

Thk threat of the whiskey dealers to close 
all the saloons in Akron, Ohio, as a punish- 
ment for restriction upon the grogshop busi- 
ness has been met by an offer from the Ohio 
Anti-Saloon League to pay half of the loss 
that will result to the saloon keepers if they 
will go ahead and make good their threat. 
It is feared that the whiskey sellers will now 
proceed to break away as gracefully as pos- 
sible. 

Some men are born great, some have great- 
ness thrust upon them, but there seems to be 
a general disposition among the deadlocked 
legislatures to make their candidates for great- 
ness pay the freight. 



THE GRAPHICS GUIDE 

Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, and Western Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, in 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



LA Off O « «sssssssssssssss$s&i 

♦ A, OUlpllUr OpringS and Baths 




. 3»» Cor. Mary and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. 

recommended by the medical profession for the cure of 
and all .Skin Affections. 



These Baths are 

Kidney and Liver complaints, Rheumatism 



A. PUISSEGUR, Proprietor MRS. L. LARIEUX, Manageress 



Bakery 

LEADVILLE BAKERY 

W. H Mayo, formerly at 826 W. Pico St., has re- 
moved to 546 S. Spring St. If not convenient 
for you to call on us at our now place, 'please 
leave your street and number so our wagon 
can stop at your home. 

Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. F;i t mas 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair 
Goods of all kinds TRY ('heme i>e Acacia 
Skin food. 224-226 W. Second St. 



Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

327 So. Spring St are Belling the old reliable 
Hoffman and have added the Tribune (blue 
streak) to their line. Wheels from $l~> 00 up. 

Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Maker Magazine . 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

N. Main St., Los ANGELES 



Dental Parlors 

DR. FRANK STEVENS 

Opci Evenings anil Sundays. Electric light 

used evenings. Tel. Urcen 93 
324J SOUTH SPRIKG ST. - - Los Anhki.es 

Electrical Contractors 
W00DILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 
Electrical Supplies and Healing Appliances. We 
give spi cial attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Aununciators, etc.— 10s W. Third St. 

Telephone Main 1123. 

Engravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

Make fine halftones, line cuts, embossing plptes 
newspaper cuts— just any hiug you want en- 
graved. See them at the Times Building, Los 
Angeles. 



Oldest and Largest Bank in Southern 
California 



OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



CAPITAL (Paid up) 8500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total $1,426,742 



Grillework 

JN0. A. SMITH 

40c per square foot and upwards. Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
"07 S. Broadway. 



OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

G. HEIMANN Assistant Cashier 



DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry C. E. Thom A. Olassell 

O. W. Childs I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Vau Nuys 

J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 



Boots and Shoes 
H.C. 



BLANEY 



Boots and Shoes for Ladies, Gents. Mis-es, Boys, 
Children, and Infants. Prices reasonable. 

352 S. Spring St. Los Angei.es 

Business College 



Kodak Supplies 

F. L. DUNGAN 

The most complete Stock in Southern Califor 
nia. First-cla's Developing and Finishing our 
Specialty. 307 W. Fourth St., near Broadway. 

Real Estate 

" Mayne finds the bargains " 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 





Leading lSi 

118 West Fourth St. 



Kstate Agents 

Los ANGELEi 



«S*Speclal Collection Department. Our safety 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent in its Dew fire and burglar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 

Main Street Savings Baok 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts. 
Temple Block 



226 So. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. In session 
all the year. Students enter any day. 

Carpet Cleaning 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax. 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Rugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid. 641 South Broadway. Phone M. 217 
Roist. Jordan 



Dancing School 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL 

For Dancing 
The Glide svstem. A class will organize for be- 
ginners Wed. eve. Jan. 25. Residence 1022 S 
Ronnie Brae. Academy Sixth and Broadway, 
Illinois Ball. Los Angeles TEL. GREEN 1291 



San Curo 

A cure for 'iheumatism. Gout. Bright's Dis 
ease and all forms of uric acid troubles; acta 
on the kidneys and cures by draining out of 
the blood the poi-onous Uric acid. Crates, 
Lithates, etc. If your druggist hasn't got it 
write or call on us. San Curo MEDICAL Co. 

4 35 Wi-m Ith STW i i.i 

Scho ;1 of Shorthand 

The Great Shorthand Revolution 

<;i'<-gg - « Light Line Sb r> it band 

Principles acquired in ten easy lessons. Students 
write Wi to No words a minute with live weeks' 
instruction. Institute 34D>£ S Bioadwav. 



Dermatologist 

JOSEPHINE R0DD0N 

Shampooing and scalp treatment Bust and 
neck development a specialty. Medicated 
baths. Facial treatment. Agent for Mrs. Nettie 
Harrison's goods. 321 West Fourth St. 



Druggist 



W. W. B0SWELL 



Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Toilet Article", 
rancy Goods, SkiDS, Sponges, Brushes, Combs, 
Perfumery, Physicians' Prescriptions carelully 
compounded. Tel. G 1372. Fourth and Hill. 



Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon. Specialist for women 

Office hours : 9 to 12 M 2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. 
Sundays. 10 to 12 M. 

540J4 S. Spring St. - - Los Angei.es 



Trusses 



W. W. SWEENEY 



Expert maker and fitter of Trusses, Hastii- Hos- | 
iery and Abdominal supporters. 'he only, 
manufacturer in S. California. Kt member the 
number, 313 S. Spring Ht. Under Kamoua ! 
Hotel. , 

Undertakers 

BRESEE BROTHERS CO. 

Funeral Directors. Broadway and Sixth Sts 
i riva e Ambulance. Lady Assistant. The best 
service and the lowest prices. 

Tel. Main 213 • - - LosAni.ei.es 



CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

APITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on dei>osits 
Money loaned on real estate only 

r. L. DUQUE President 

[. N. VAN NUYS V.ce-Prcsidcnt 

B. V. DUQUE Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Kasper '01111, II. 
W. O'Melveny, J. B. Lankershim, O. T. Johnson, 
T. L. Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. G. KerckhoiT, A. 
Haas. 

Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estat: in probate, heverslon'ry 
and Life Interests In Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
011. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from f 10,000 to $500, 000 avail- 
able for investment 01 mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



NOT1CK OF FOUKCLOSURK SALK 

Sheriff's Sale. No. 31,963. 
Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation), plaintiff, vs. Lizzie il. ralton. 
defendant. 

Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and sale. 

Under and by virtue of an order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, issm-d out of the Su- 
perior Court of the countv of Los Angeles, of the 
State of California, on the 20th day of January, 
A. I)., lKi)9. in the above entitled action, where- 
in Provident Mutual Building Loan Association 
(a corporation) the above named plaintiff, 
obtained a Judgment and decree of foreclosure 
and sale against Lizzie M Dal ton, defendant, on 
the Kith day of January, A. I). \HM, for the sum of 
Three Hundred and Forty-three A 10-100 (8313 10) 
Hollars, lawful money of the United States, 
which said decree was, 011 the 20th day ol 
Janmry, A. D. I899, recorded In Judgment 
Book 82 of said Court, at page 12.1 am com- 
manded to sell all the certain lot, piece, or 
parcel of land situate, lying and being in the 
countv of Los Angeles, state of California, and 
hounded and de-cribed as follows: 

Lot Number one (1), Block "A v of the Ninth 
Street Tract Kxtension. as per map recorded in 
Book 65, pages 89 ami 90 of Miscellaneous Rec- 
ords of said county of Ixis A ngeles, together 
with tl'.f tenements, hereditaments and appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging, or in any wise ap- 
pertaining. 

Public notice is hereby given that on Tuesday, 
the 1 Ith day or February, A. D. 1899. at 12 o'clock 
M of that day. In front of the Court House dooi 
of the county of l.os Angeles, Broadway entrance, 
I will, in obedience to said order of sale and de- 
cree of foreclosure and sale, sell the above de- 
scribed property, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to satisfy said judgment, with interest 
and cost-, etc . to the highest and best bidder, 
for cash lawful money of the f. S 

Dated this 20th day'of January, 1899. 

W. A. HAMM KL 
Sheriff of Los Angeles County 

By JOHN R. SLATKR Deputy Sheriff. 

Miller .t Brown, Attorneys for Plaintiff 



the J^osslyn 



Main Street opp. Post Office 

The finest equipped Hotel at Moderate 
rates in 

LOS ANGELES 

140 Klegant Rooms — with steam beat, 
telephones, hot ami cold running water, 
and light and air in every room. 

ICIectric Klevator, Continuous service. 
70 sunny suits with private baths. Super- 
ior dining room service. 

Katea American Plan Wis to 1*3 pei day 
Kates Kuropoan Plan Wl per day up 



Klectric cats to depots and all points of Interest 
Public and Private Parlors Orchestra music 
during dinner hours. 

AISNKK I.. KOSS, Prop. 



1 1 



Western Graphic 



Zowr\ Talk and prattle 

THE presence of ex-Governor Beveridge 
of Illinois in the procession on Wash- 
ington's Birthday recalls to the writer curious 
instances of longevity among the governors of 
that state. During the war Richard Yates 
was governor and was succeeded by Gen- 
eral John M. Palmer, who was elected in 

1864, taking his seat on the first of January, 

1865. Yates went into the Senate and died 
some years later. From the close of the lat- 
ter's term as governor to the present time 
there has never been a death among the men 
elected governor of Illinois since — a period of 
thirty-four years. When it is remembered 
that these men were not elected until they 
were well along in life, it will be seen that it 
is a most remarkable instance of longevity. 
The ex-governors of that state now living are: 
John R. Palmer, Richard J. Oglesby, Shelby 
Cullom, John L Beveridge, John A. Hamil- 
ton, Joseph Fifer, J. T. Altgeld. Their united 
ages will probably average seventy five years. 
Inclding the term of the present governor, 
this 6hows a record of thirty- four years with- 
out a death among the chief executives of the 
Prairie State. Looking back a like term of 
years from 1865, we find that on the contrary 
death followed the governors very closely 
after retirement from office. When Yates re- 
tired he was the only ex governor until 
Palmer went out of office, and it was very 
rare that more than one or two ex-governors 
were living at the same time. Evidently 
modern politics do not make such demands 
upon the vitality of politicians as did the old 
time methods of our fathers— at least not in 
the Prairie State. 

The Sunset Club, by command of those 
dictators, Fred L. Alles and Louis F. Vetter, 
who, surmising a deterioration of gray matter 
among their fellows, arranged with Levy for 
a fish dinner at his cafe, partook of an ichthy- 
ological repast that was perfect last evening, 
forty odd members being present. These 
were also regaled by J. S. Slauson, who read 
a most interesting and able paper entitled, 
"Expansion — Imperialism; the Fitness of 
Our Nation for Expansion; the Inherent Sov- 
ereign Right of Expansion, or, Imperialism 
Fully Vested in our Government;" after 
which the subject was discussed with skill and 
animation. The menu was as follows: 
Fresh shrimps 

Cracked crabs 
Bouillabaise 
Steamed cockles and mussels 
Razor clams 

Stuffed turbot 
Fricandeau of tenderloin of beef 
Russian salad 
Cheese Black coffee 

One of the best posted liverymen in 
Southern California is H. L. Scott, for thirteen 
years a resident of Los Angeles, who has just 
opened a new and modern place at 542 South 
Figueroa street, the Bellevue Livery and 
Boarding Stable. Mr. Scott for eight years 
owned the Palmer House Livery in Chicago, 
an $80,000 stable, and his name is a guarantee 
for splendid service and equipment. 

G. W. Kingsbury, proprietor of the Lick 
House, San Francisco, who was the guest of 
Police Commissioner T. J. Goss last week, said 



on Sunday morning that he guessed he would 
go out and get a drink. Goss said, " You 
can't get anything in this town today." Kings- 
bury then went out, followed by Goss, and 
soon afterward they met Mayor Eaton on 
Broadway and Kingsbury told the Mayor his 
tale of woe. The Mayor replied: "I am 
sorry for you" — and in an hour Bob Eckert 
was attending to the trio, and cold water was 
not the only potable indulged in. 

There is only one remark by press and 
public regarding the performance of the cor- 
oner over Hunter's body, and that is that it 
was disgraceful. This opinion is unanimous 
unless possibly the other undertaking firm 
takes the side of the coroner — and, why 
shouldn't it? 

Roy Jones, who returned from San Fran- 
cisco and Nevada a few days ago, after a two 
weeks' trip, was in town during the week look- 
ing as buoyant and compact as if he had 
taken all the first-class premiums at the late 
Horse Show . 

I do not know that it will — but the tragic 
event of Saturday last should— teach two les- 
sons: It should teach young men of the 
Hunter class that the art of going through life 
in false colors is a compromising art. Here 
was a young man who lived partly on bor- 
rowed money and whose attire was faultless 
and who enjoyed membership in the high club 
of the town, but was often shy on monthly 
dues and for much that he owed for what he 
wore and for many other things that he had 
obtained on credit. His habiliments were of 
the most immaculate kind, from his high- 
priced Derby to his Oxford pumps, and his 
swell cane and corded silk umbrella and four- 
in-hand ties were in exquisite keeping with 
the rest of his tout ensemble. He employed 
a stenographer, kept a dog, and was a first- 
nighter at concert and show. And yet he 
earned less means than would have enabled a 
journeyman mechanic to pay his way daily 
through the world. He was a toucher of the 
most daring kind and was ever ready to stand 
off his creditors — even to the man who had 
loaned him hard-earned money — with a club 
and in language unfit for public print. 

The other lesson is quite as important, and 
more to be heeded. Your Alfords should be 
taught that the shooting to death of a human 
being in an altercation regarding a small debt 
is a deed almost too dreadful and infamous 
for description. It is true that Hunter had 
acted scamp-like and had bestowed epithets 
upon his creditor that would have mocked the 
lexicon of Billingsgate. It is probably true 
that Hunter never intended to pay Alford, or 
anyone else, if he could avoid doing so. But 
nothing of so trivial a character should have 
at all engendered the shooting of the trans- 
gressor in cold blood. To be sure there will be 
the uncontradicted evidence that Hunter 
struck at Alford with his savage stick, and 
testimony that the latter shot in self-defence. 
But Alford's crime was in going after Hunter 
in great passion with a threat of blackmail 
and a loaded revolver handily in one of his 
pockets. It was only the little genteeler 
method of the highwayman and burglar who 
systematically go about their nefarious pro- 
fessions, ready to kill anyone that objects. 
Hunter may have been a poor excuse for a 
gentleman, but he should not have been shot 
to death like a cur on that account. 



The brightest of sunshine is ever adorning 
The sky of the lucky man's life, 

Who can creep into bed at two in the morning 
And never awaken his wife. 



And so, my festive young friend, Cal. 
Byrne, has gone and got married. And the 
best of it is he has married the woman he 
first loved. That is romantic and nice. Mrs. 
Sherwood was her married name. Her maiden 
name was Hope Ellis, and she was well 
known as pretty Miss Hope Ellis. She used 
to go to Del Monte back in the — well, I 
needn't name the year. But it wasn't so long 
ago at any rate. Cal. and she were lovers, 
and they were a splendid looking couple. In 
time they became engaged, and then — and 
then — they quareled. Others have done so. 
James Buchanan and his best girl quareled — 
and never made up. Washington Irving 
and his sweetheart also had a misunderstand- 
ing, and the young lady died and Irving 
never married. Well, Cal. and Hope just had 
it warm, and then they drifted apart, and in 
time Miss Ellis became Mrs. Sherwood. Her 
married life, however, was not pleasant, and 
she soon became divorced. But during all 
these years there had remained a spark of the 
true love she bore her former sweetheart. It 
needed but a breath to fan it into a flame. 
At the inaugural ball a few weeks ago Mrs. 
Sherwood and Mr. Byrne, quite by accident, 
met again, and they again became engaged 
and were married on St. Valentine's Day at 
the Palace Hotel in San Francisco. The 
wedding was a very quiet but really a very 
pretty affair. The rooms were profusely dec- 
orated with peach blossoms and, of course, 
orange blossoms. In the big bay window, in 
a perfect bower of flowers and blossoms, the 
couple stood while Father \Vyman of S'. 
Mary's church performed the marriage cere- 
mony. James W. Byrne, a brother of the 
groom, was the best man; the bride was unat- 
tended. The bride, who is quite a handsome 
woman, presented a most striking appearance, 
wearing an elegant dress of pearl-gray satin 
trimmed with point lace and chiffon. A stock 
of pale pink violet relieved the gray color of 
the gown, all of which was setoff with a toque 
of dotted tulle. She carried pink roses. Mrs. 
Margaret Irvine, the mother of the groom, 
wore a gown of gray satin, brocaded, and 
Mrs. Ellis, the bride's mother, was attired in 
ruby grenadine over black silk. After the 
ceremony about fifty guests eat down to a 
sumptuous wedding breakfast, and later Mr. 
and Mrt?. Byrne started for Coronado, where 
they now are. 

Now that the Horse Show is all over and 
everything nearly settled, it is no harm to say 
that it was one of the best managed and one 
of the mo3t economically carried out schemes 
this country has ever known, and by far the 
most stylish and generally satisfactory; and, 
best of all, without a strictly nice day during 
the entire time, and a postponement over a 
Sunday, the venture nearly made expenses, 
which was all that was intended. And that 
reminds me, that it was the unanimous 
opinion of Messrs. Hobart, Parrott, Tobin, 
Baldwin, Rose, Merry, Kirkpatrick and others, 
that Mrs. Severance's pair of browns was by 
far the handsomest, strongest and most valu- 
able single team shown; and as a Santa Bar- 
bara man wanted to purchase the best pair of 
horses exhibited, he accepted the opinion of 
these gentlemen, three or four of whom had 
horses to sell, and paid Mrs. Severance one 
thousand dollars for said browns, and he also 
took with him her bays, for which he paid her 
eight hundred dollars. He will probably come 
down here next year with a four-in-hand and 
brake that will capture first prize and a punch 
bowl that will be given by Mr. Huntington or 
some other gentleman. 



Western Graphic 



FINEST BARBER SHOP SOUTH OF VAN NCYS HOTEL IN CONNECTION 

Plain f» II Medicated 

Electric LJ f\ I II Vapor 

From 15 ctsto 5o cts F. J. MOLL, JR., Proprietor 

Ladies private entrance on Wall street 252 EAST FIFTH ST 



HUMflEL BROS. & CO. 



TELEPHONE 

MAIN 509 



Employment Agents 



Basement California 
Bank Buildiug 

Carefully selected help of all kinds promptly furnished Qfin U| Q of Qonnnrl 9t (:or - 

Strictly reliable and largest agency on Pacific const "U" HBSl OGuUIIU 01. Broadway 




| Los Angel 
| Pipe Organ Co. 



5 

Chan. K. Conrad *jl 
He"ry Wllhelin 

Pneumatic Electro Pneumatic 
Action and Pueumatic Couplers 
our Specialty. Organs 
rebuilt by the latest sys- 
tems. Special specifica- 
tions furnished ou short 
notice. Organs taken cate of 
by yearly contract. Piano 
and Organ tuning and 
repairing ™" 



liuilde » of 

Church 
..Concert.. 

And 

J Parlor Pipe Organs 

g Factory: 

£ 8th and San Pedro Sts. 

Los Angeles Tel. Qreen 1633 



! 



JOSEPH MAIER 

President and Treas 

Home 
Industry 



MAIER & 
ZOBELELN 



444 ALISO STREET 



GEOR'iE ZOBELE1N 

7ice-Pres. and Sec y 

Keep Money 
at Home 




TEL. 91 



LOS ANGELES, CAL 



LOS ANGELES 

Assay Office and Mining Exciianoe 

C. C. DEAN, MANAGER 

Assaying a Specialty Low Rates and Accuracy 
MINES EXAMINED AND SAMPLED 



149 NORTH MAIN St. 

I: Him - "> and 6 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



Rave You had Your Slinter Slllt ? 




JVeecL- 



ONE OF KELLflM'S 

Business 
Suits ^ 

108 West 2nd st. 



$15.00 



Some fight ou paper 
Authors write ou paper 
Others read ou paper 
Walters' lead on paper 

La'est Ingrain Comhinatins 

for 12 foot room $3.50 
WALTER BROS. 

627 S. Spring St. 
Tel. Main 1055 



Crea mery Building^ 

A NEW DEPARTURE 
IN CREAMERY CONSTRUCTION 
Write us for particulars.... 

Separators, Vats, Churns, or 

Anything you need 
To Make Butter or Cheese 
Spend one stamp on us. 

F. M. WltSON & CO. 

Selma, Clark Co., Ohio. 



N'OTICK TO ( KKIHTOHS 

Estate of Charles O. Hasken, deceased. 
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, Ida 
Haskln, executrix of the IsM « ill and testament 
of Chas. C. Hiiskin, deceased. t« the creditors of. 
anil all persons having claims against, the said 
deceased, to exhibit the same with the necessary 
vouchers within ten months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, to the said executrix, at 
the office of (.raves, O'Melvenv & Shankland 
rooms 1!» to 21 Baker block, In 'said city of Los 
Angeles, California, which is hereby designated 
as the place of business of said executrix. 
Dated this 20th day of February. A. D. ls<i<) 
IDA RASKIN, 
Executrix of said estate. 
Graves, O'Melvcny .V Shankland. 

Attorneys for executrix. 



i Simon liafeTI 



Wholesale 
Butcher 
Packer 



and 



Telephone Main 155 



149-151-153 N. 



4 

Spring Street j 
> 



Nice Dry 
Oak and 
Juniper . 



WOOD! 



Park Market 

CHAS. KBSTNBB,;Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 



329 West Fifth St. 



Also COAL Delivered 



Telephone Bed Win 



Black Diamond 
AYellingi on 

Special Prices by the Carload 



•10.00 • 
$ io.r>o • 



W. E. CLARK 



Tel - West 69 



1248 SO. FIGUEROA • 



Patents 



GopyriQhts 
Trade Marks 
Labels 




"Our folks are not 
a bit afraid of 

POISON OAK 

or any skin disease. 
One 25 cent box or 
the flexican Remedy 
knocks it in one 
night " You can 
buy it of your drug- 
gist, or send to the 

Mexican Botanical Co. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



TOW NSEND BROS. 

Tel. Main 347 321-324 Patomac Block 
Broadway 
Los Aiigalep, Cal. 



The '-Spring- of 9<»" Edition of Western 
Graphic will be an elaborate affair never 
before equalled in the United States. Cal- 
ifornia will be proud of the issue 



Wanamaker & Brown (Philadelphia) 

Titchner & Jacobi (Rochester) 

JVIade to JVIeasure Suits,*? 



Every mote and fuzzis wool \ 
Wool and only wool 

Every thread wool J 



JlO.and up 



free 

Delivery 



Agency 325 South Broadway 

Call and see us or drop PS a postal card and we will sknd you SAMPLES or 
CALL upon you. OPBN v Saturday evenings. 

JEFFERY A: JEFFERY, Agents., 325 So. Broadway 



California 
Limited... 



Santa Fe 
Route 



Our Wines fire unexcelled f j The Fastest Regular Train E,ver Run Across the Continent 



They are selected from the finest Sonoma Valley and Southern California ! H 
* Vintages. . , , % 

Our prices make them within the reach of every purse. A trial will fi 
convince you. w 

Old Sonoma Claret 35c gal I Wines in bottles, the 50c kind, A 

Old Sonoma Zinfandel, very fine 41c jal I per boills, 25c &t 

5-year-old Port 50c gal I Good Whisky in bulk $1-90 gal $ 

5 '' Sherry, Angelica & Mnscat, 65c gal I Quart Bottle of Fine Whisky 75c 

All other goods in proportion. A 

We carry a full line of FINE LIQUEURS | 
Eastern shipments a specialty. 



HAVE YOU NOTICED THE SCHEDULE? CONNE ITWG rBAINS 

, „ Arrives Omaha - - 6.00 a.m. Thur. Silt. TueH. 

Leaves Log Angles 1.30 p.m. Hon. Wed. Sat. ArrivegSt , •„«.. 7 .00 a.m. Thur. Hat. Tuea. 

Arrive.-. Denver - - 5 00 p.m. Wed. Frl. Mon. Arrives Fort Vt 'h - 8.00 a.m. Thur. Sat. Tuca. 

Arrives Kansas City - 9.10 p.m. Wed Frl. Mon. Arrives St Paul - - 7.00 p.m. Thur. Sat. Tucs. 

Arrives Chicago - - 9.52 a.m. Thurs. Sat. TOM. Arrives New York - 1.30 p.m. Frl. Hun. Wed. 



Arrives Boston 



:!.00 p.m. Frl. Sun. Wed. 



The California Limited is made up of the highest elass of equipment. Is lighted by electricity 
and carries composite and Observation cars with every accommodation for ladles and gentlemen 
The Dining Car gives iiueoiialcd sen ice. 

This splendid train is for first-class travel only, hut there is no extra charge beyond the rcgu 
lar ticket and sleeping car rate an<' is in addition to the regular Dal ly O vci land Kxpreae 
which carries both Pullman Palace and tourist cars through to Chicago. 



f EDWARD GEKMA1N WINE CO 4 

397-399 S Los Angeles St. 



Tel. 1*1. 919 
No bar in con- 
nection 
Free Delivery 



H. K. Q92G0BY, Asst Qen'l Pe/senget Agt 

8. C. and S. Fe, P. roads, Los Angeles. 



JNO. J. BYKNK, (ien'l Passenger Agt. 

H. C and H. Fe P. roads, Los Angeles 



HOTEL RAMONfl 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Most Centrally Located. First-class at Modern Kate 

Cor. Spring and Third Streets 

-F. B. MALLORY Proo. 



m 

g 



m 

I 



i 




MALIETOA TANUS AND CONSULATE BUILDINGS. 
Samoa once more conies to the front. Malietoa TaxnU was declared king by Chief 
Justice Chambers, but Germany's representative of the three cornered protectorate 
protested. Mataafa took advantage of the situation, went to war, and is now doing 
the kingly. The American and the British consulate are shown. They are important 
points just now. 



McCaL's Patterns—None higher than 15c 




A Word of Ribbons 

The arrival of hundreds of pieces of beautiful Ribbons puts 
new life into the always lively Ribbon section. 

A wonderful collection of the new self-gathering Ribbons in 
various widths and exquisite color effects are now ready. 

We offer No. 2 Satin and Gros Grain Ribbons at 25c a 
piece. All colors liglit and dark, exceptional quality for the 
price. 

Elegant Moire Taffeta Ribbons, five inches wide, all pure 
silk, all colors, 25 cents a yard. We doubt if you've seen equal 
quality and width for less than 40 cents a yard. 

317-325 SOUTH BROADWAY 

Between Third and Fourth Street 




OXFORDS 

For. . . 
Spring 
Wear 



77|k'yk Got 'Km on the Nobbiest Lasts, in every 
variety. Black or Tan Kid or Cloth Top. We 
think we have the Finest Southern Tie in the city for 
$2.00. Drop in and see them. 



IIM6S-GliDP Shoe GO. 



258 So. Broadway 



231 W. Third St. 



Sole Agents for the Jenness Miller 
Hvgenic Shoes for Ladies. 



IMPROVED DRY PROCESS 




"It looks just like new 
Didn't shrink a bit" 



For cleaning garments and 
all fabrics without the least 
shrinkage or injury— white 
watered silk cleaned as 
successfully as black broad- 
cloth. 



Our process has long sir.ee 
passed the experimental 
stage. Do not hesitate to 
trust us with your best and 
most delicate fabrics as we 
fully guarantee you against 
loss or disappointment. 

m 

Telephone Main 551 



City Dye and Cleaning Works 

345 SOUTH BROADWAY 

DURAND & MOFFITT 



WENDELL EASTON 

President 



GEORGE EASTON 

Vice-President 



GEO. D. EASTON 

Secretary 



ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK 
Treasurer 



Be up to date and invest your money where it will bring quick 
returns. Invest in the most attractive part of the city, the 

MENLO PARK TRACT 

Large Lots. Streets Improved. Two Car Lines, but twelve minutes 
from business center. JSTobby homes building in every block. 

It will pay you to call on us. 



EASTON ELDRIDGE & Co. 



121 SOUTH BROADWAY 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Press of leo. Rice & Sons (Inc..) 311 313 New High Street 




SPRING OF '99 EDITION 




PRICE 25 CENTS 



THE GRAPHIC'S GUIDE 

Every individual or firm here represented is responsible, anil WESTKRN Graphic 
guarantees subscribers against loss through misrepresentation or otherwise, ill 
return for which Western Graphic asks that you mention this column when 
you trade with these advertisers. 



finest barber shop south of vax nuys hotel in connection 

Plain 
Electric 

From 15 cts to 5o cts F. J. MOLL, JR., Proprietor 

Ladies private entrance on Wall street 252 EAST FIFTH ST 



BATHS 



Medicated 
Vapor 



Bakery 

LEADVILLE BAKERY 

W. H Mayo, formerly at X2fi \V. Pico St., has re- I 
moved to f>46 S. Spring St. If not convenient I 
for yon to call on ns at our now place, please ! 
leave your street and number so our wagon j 
can stop at your home. 



Beauty Parlors 

IMPERIAL HAIR BAZAAR 

Manicuring for ladies and gentlemen. Fa e mas- 
sage, Hairdressing. Shampooing, Human Hair 
Goods of all kinds Tisy ckk.mk i>k Acacia 
Skin food. 2J4-JJH W. SmiSii St. 

Bicycles 

WILLIAMSON BROS. 

827 So. Spring St are selling the old reliable 
Hoffman and have added the Tribune (blue 
streak) to their line. Wheels from 825 00 up. 

Book Binder 

HENRY J. PAULY 

Bookbinder and Blank Book Milker .Magazine . 
Music and Books of Art bound in all styles at 
moderate prices. 

115% N. Main St., Los Angei.es 

Boots and Shoes 

H.C. BLANEY 

Boots and Shoes for Ladies, Gents. Mis=es, Boys, 
Children, and Infants. Prices reasonable. 

352 S. Si-ring St. Los Angei.es 



Business College 





226 So. Spring St.. Los Angeles, Oal. In session 
all. the year students enter any day. 

Carpet Cleaning 
PIONEER STEAM CARPET CLEANING WORKS 

Specialties: Cleaning of Wilton, Velvet, Ax- 
minster, Moquette Carpets, Fine Rugs. Sewing 
and fitting done. Carpets taken up, cleaned 
and laid, fill South Broadway. Phone M. 217 
Rout. Jordan 

Dancing School 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL 

Pot Dancing 

The Glide system. A class will organize for be- 
ginners Wed. eve. Jan. 26. Residence 1022 S 
Bonnie Bra°. Academv Sixth and Broad war, 
Illinois Hall. I os Angeles Tel. Gueen 1291 



Electrical Contractors 
W00DILL & HULSE ELECTRIC CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

Electrical Supplies and Heating Appliances. We 
give special attention to Repair Work, Bells, 
Annunciators, etc. — 10S W. Third St. 

Telephone M ain 1125. 

hngravers 

THE AMERICAN ENGRAVING CO. 

| Make line halftones, line cuts, embossing plates 
| newspaper cuts— just any hiug you want en 
I graved. See them at the Times Building, Los 
Angeles. 

Grillework 

JNO. A. SMITH 

10c per square foot and upwards Used for door- 
ways, arches, etc. Designs unique and artistic. 
707 S". Broadway. 

Kodak Supplies 

F. L. DUNGAN 

The most complete Stock in Southern Califor 
nia. First-ela'S Developing and Finishing our 
Specialty. 307 W Fourth St., near Broad w ay. 

Printing 

GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

The largest and best equipped in Southern Cali- 
fornia. Fine halftone and photo-chrome 
printing a specially. 

311-313 New High St. - - LosANgei.es 

Real Estate 

• ■ M a I tie li li d * the bargai us ' ' 

C. E. MAYNE & CO. 

Leading; Heal Estate Agents 

lis West Fourth St. - LosAni.ei.es 

San Curo 

A cure for : heumatism. Gout. Bright's Dis- 
ease and all forms of uric acid troubles; acts 
on the kidneys and cures by draining out of 
the blood the poi-onous Uric acid. Urates, 
Lithates, etc. If your druggist hnsu'i got it 
write or call on us San Onto Medical Co. 

!:'.> WliM 1th STREET. 

School of Shorthand 

The Great Shorthand Revolution 



Main Street Savings Bank 

function of Main, Spring and Temple BtS, 
Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED KOO.OOC 

A PITA L STOCK PAID UP WOMB 

Interest paid on deposits 

Hon erf loaned on real estate only 

r. L. DUQUE President 

t. N. VAN NUYS Wee President 

B. V. DUQUE Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman. Kasper Cohn, H. 
W. 1 1 Melveny, J. B. Lankershim, O. T. Johnson. 
T. L. Duque. I. N. Van Nuys, W. G. KerckhorT, A. 

Haae. 



the J^osslyn 



Main Street opp. Post Office 

The finest equipped Hotel at Moderate 
rates in 

LOS ANGELES 

140 Elegant Rooms — with steam heat, 
telephones, hot and cold running water, 
and light and air in ever}' room. 

Electric Elevator. Continuous service. 
70 sunny suits with private baths. Super- 
ior dining room service. 

Kales Amei loan Plan *s to S3 pei day 
Kates Bnroponn Plan Si per day up 



Electric cars to depots and all points of interest 
Public and Private Parlors Orchestra music 
during dinner hours. 

V BN BR I.. ROS8, Prop. 



Gregg's Light Line Shorthand 

Principles acquired In ten easy lessons. Students ■ ■% . — . 11/1 . a r 

60 to 80 words a minute with live weeks' I-' A L> It ffl \ Y< IV r -1 I 

instruction. Imstttutb 840}£ 8 Broadwav. M im IV lx i' ini\l\L« 1 



Dermatologist 

JOSEPHINE R0D00N 

Shampooing and scalp treatment Bust and 
neck development a specialty. Medicated 
baths. Facial treatment. Agent for Mrs. Nettie 
Harrison's aoods. 321 West Fourth St. 



Specialist 

J. W. GOING, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon. Specialist for women 

Office hours: 9 to 12 M 2 to 5 and 7 to x P. M. 
Sundays, 10 to 12 M. 

540}-^ S. Spring St. - - I. os Angeles 



CHA8. kkstnkk. Proprietor 

The Choicest of Meats 



Trusses 



W W. SWEENEY 



329 West Fifth St. 



1 acre in Downey; I acre to '.(year-old navel 
oranges; '., act e to "deciduous fruits; 10i) chick 
ens; ?j0h income this year; 5 room house, bam. 
chicken-house; fine well; $1250. 

10'., acres, '., mile from Downey; 5 to alfalfa, 
5 acres ready for barley, alfalfa or corn; tome 
fruits in bearing; 9 room 2-story house, 2 barns, 
Windmill and tank buildings, all new; this Is a 
bargain; SMOOO. 

li acres, with 7 room bouse, bam, crib and 
stable near Downey; iil) bearing walnuts, 425 
bearing Washington navel oranges, 9 0 or (00 de- 
ciduous fruits in bearing, of all varieties; good 
well and a rim water right; 83000. 

20 acres, 2 miles from Downey: 17 acres ready 
for alfalfa: 2 aitesian wells and a ditch water 
right; 6 room house, barn. »rib and familv orch 
a'd; (2300, 

100 acres. l' v ml es from Downey; all good for, 
com, bai ley or alfalfa: fenced and cross-fenced; 
2 email houses; (00 per acre; y 2 cash, balance 1, 
2 and :> years. 

ID acres fi ,c walnut land in the walnut belt 
east of Downey ; 80 acres In alfalfa. 5 acres in ifi 
year-old soft shell walnuts. 4 acres to corn, 1 acre 
to fruits; 6-room house, large barn, 7-inch well, 
and 10 shares ,vater stock ; the best ranch in this 
• alley; this aneh lias paid the owner over 82000 
this fear; (260 per acre. 

Downey is strictly in it. she is coming to the 
front with head up and ail in the timber: 5 to I 
new fan, ilics come here every mouth. Downey 
has furnished the new Governor, District Attor- 
ney. Public Administrator and School Superin- 
tendent. She expects to furnish a President in a 
fe» years more, and she does more business in 
one J ear than any town in the State of its size. 

Downey shipped 125 carloads of oranges and 
the association *!2">.0(>0 worth of walnuts |«st 
year. This valley has produced this year $50,01)0 
worth of alfalfa and barley hay, 850,010 worth of 
milk and butter, 820,000 in chiciceiis, turkeysand 
eggs, 810,000 in corn, $10 not) in grapes, and hun- 
dreds and hundreds of tons of fruits of the very 
best variety. Downey will have a cannery for 
this year's fruit. The tanners htve something to 
sell here every day in the year. Ai d this is the 
be-t watered valley in the State 

With hundreds of tons 1 f beets, melons. • ir. - 
runs, and thousands of hogs and cows lor sale: 
good schools and plenty of churches, do you 
wonder at our people for being prosperous and 
happy.' We feel thankful there is 5 or fi miles 
Square here where we have no sandstorms. 

Kvery newc met that rides over this valley 
with me says it Is the finest valley ihey ever saw. 

For walnuts, oranees, alfalfa, barley, eows, 
hogs corn, pumpkins, beets, citrons, pnta'oes, 
chickens, turkeys, deciduous fruits and veget- 
ables, this valley beats them all. You ought to 
see the water Bowing down our ditches 

Dowucy, in the i.os Nietos Valley. 12 miles 
southeast of Los Angeles, is in the lead <iur 
climate cannot be excelled. I have 1 een here 12 
years, have every bargain for sale in the valley. 

K. M. BLTTHE, 

Downey, Cal. 



Drugrist 



W. W. BOSWELL 



Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Toilet Articles, 
l aucy Goods, skins, Sponges, Brushes, Ccmbs, 
Perfumery, Physicians' Prescriptions carefully 
compounded. Tel. G 1372. Fourth and Hi 1,1,. 



Dental Parlors 

DR. FRANK STEVENS 

Open Evenings and Sundays. Electric 

used evenings. Tel. Green 93 
324J south spring St. 



Expert maker and fitter of Trusses, Elastic Hos- 
iery and Abdominal Supporters. he only 
manufacturer in 8. California . Rtmemberthe 
number, 313 S. Spring St. Under Raraona 
Hotel. 

Undertakers 

BRESEE BROTHERS CO. 

Funeral Directors. Broadway and Sixth Sts 
> rivaie Ambulance. Lady Assistant. The best 
service and the lowest prices. 
Tel. Main 243 - - - LosAnoei.es 

Wood-Carpet 

JNO. A. SMITH 

81.25 per square yard and upwards. Parquet 
light Floors, Strip lloors, etc. Can he laid equally 
well in new or old houses. Cleanly, healthful 
Los Angeles and permanent. 707 S. Broadway. 



-phone Ke<l 93 fi 



WOOD I 



Nice Dry 
Oak and 
Juniper ■ 

Also COAL Delivered • 

Blaeb Diamond - - S1O.O0 • 

Wellington - - SlO.fio « 

Special Prices by the Carload • 



W. E. CLARK 



LA Off O * .\XVvm»^ w%VWV>V sSfi 

♦ A* OUlpJlUr OpringS and Baths 



1248 SO. FIGUER0A 



Tel - West 69 



NOTICE TO CKKIllTIIKs 

Estate of ( harli s C. Hasken, deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned Ida 
Haekln, executrix of the last will aud testament 
of ( has. C. Haski 1, deceased, to the creditors of. 
and al 1 persons having claims against, the said 
deceased. In exhibit 1 he same with the necessary 
vouchers wiihin ten months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, to the said executrix, at 
the office of Graves, (('Melveny & Sbankland. 
rooms 111 to ill Baker block, in said city of Los 
Angeles, California, which is hereby designated 
as the place of business of said executrix 

Dated this 20th dav of February. A. D. 1S99. 

' IDA RASKIN, 
Executrix of said estate. 
Graves, O'Melvcny .V Shanklaud. 

Attorneys for executrix. 



Cor. Macy and Lyon Sts. and 851 Howard St. VP 
Baths are recommended bv the medical profession for the cure of % 

1 



These 

Kidney ana Liver complaints, Rheumatism, and all Skin Affections. 



A. PUISSEGUR, Proprietor 



MRS. L. LABJEUX, Manageress 



Oldest and Largest Hank in Southern 
Cal iforniii 



Large sums 
to lend... 

On unredeemed interests in Estates, 
Real Estate in probate, Reversionary 
and Life Interests in Real and Personal 
Property. Annuities and Legacies. 

Life Insurance Policies bought or loaned 
on. Patents, sold on favorable terms and 
capital procured to develop and perfect 
meritorious inventions and ideas. 

Amounts from $ 10,000 to $500,000 avail- 
able for investment on mortgage of 
Revenue Producing Securities. 

For terms and particulars address 

R. GOULD 

131 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



\j 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) $500,000 

SURPLUS AND RESERVE 926,742 

Total (1,426,742 

OFFICERS 

I. W. HELLMAN President 

EL W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

G. HEIMANN Assistant Cashiei 

DIRECTORS 

W. H. Perry ('. E. Thorn A. Glassell 

O. W. Childs L W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Vau Nuys 

J, F. Francis H W. Hellman L W. Hellman 

*9~Speclal Collection Department. Our safety 
deposit department offers to the public, safes for 
rent in its new fire and burglar proof vault, 
which is the strongest, best guarded and best 
lighted in this city. 



Some fight on paper C 
Authors write on paper / 
Others read on paper { 
Walters' lead on paper 
La est Ingrain Combinatins 
for 12 foot room $3.50 
WALTER BROS. 

627 S. Spi 
Tel. Main 1055 




iring St. v 



GopuriQlits 
Fiade Marks 
Labels 



Patents 



TOWNSEND BROS. 

Tel. Main .147 .l'£l-'.tft4 I'atoinae Block 
It road way 

Los Angeles. Cal. 



5l?e 

Bell N uieu/ 



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S. FIGUEROA 



U u( ? r y 



arid Boarding 
$cables 



H. L. SCOTT, Proprietor 

Phone Main 432 Opp. Hotel Belleview 
Terrace. First-class Turnouts 
of all kinds. Fine saddle horses for 
Ladies and Gentleman 




"Our folks are not 
a bit afraid of 

POISON OAK 

or any skin disease. 
One 25 cent box ot 
the Hexican Remedy 
knocks it in one 
night " You can 
buy it of your drug- 
gist, or send to the 

Mexican Botanical Go. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Western Graphic 



i 



TERMINAL BEACH, The Flowerofthe Pacific 



FINEST PLACE FOR 



4- 





5ea Bathing 
Yachting ™* 
Fishing... 

ON TUB PACIFIC COAST 

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Frequent Train Service 
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Los flngcies 

Termina 

Railway 

Ticket • and f u 1 1 Information can bo 

Tel. Main 960 2 1 4 S. Spring St. 



C. E. Mayne&Co. -± 



The! Real Estate 

Progres- . 

sue pirm — ^ 

Keeps a fine six- horse Tally- ho, which 
they place at the disposal of visitors, to 
enable them to see all points of interest in 
and around Los Angeles. 

C. E. Mayne & Co. 

Real Estate 

118 West Fourth St. Los flngoles 



9 Blake | 
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I T" PAPER 

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Commercial Photography in all its Branches A 
Largest Collection of Views in 
Southern California. 
Flash Lights — ^ 

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Landscape 
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^5 Los Angeles, Cal. 

/ We furnish this paper. ^t^r 

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^JAREFUL attention gfben to developing and printing for jjk 
(Amateurs. Lantern Slides made to order from negatives j^L 
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Western Graphic 



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blood 

Pure blood depends on the 

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Typhoid may be avoided by 

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It costs you less than two 
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It is the great health drink- 
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Why not order it at once? 

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In traveling reaches the superlative in Sunset Limited. Sou- 
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Sunset Route — not a new railway but a thoroughly equipped 
line tested by years of service. 

LEAVES LOS ANGELES 3:00 P. M. 
WEDNESDAYS AND SUNDAYS 

Connnections are ( verywhere good and from New Orleans fast 
express trains luxuriously equipped reach Cincinnati, Detroit 
Chicago, Washington, Baltimore, New York and Boston and 
points beyond those gateways. 



SUNSET LIMITED 



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261 S. Spring; St. Cor. Third 



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fornia. Lantern Slides made to order and Kodak furnishing for Amateurs. 



1$ a a tierce 



WESTERN GRAPHIC 



Volume VI. 
Number 9. 



Los Angeles, Saturday, March 4, 1899. 



Price 25 Cents 



Western Graphic 



GEO. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

ben. c. Truman :-: :-: :.; edii 



^pHE PUBLISHERS of Western Graphic 
*~ present to their readers today the most 
pretentious, the most costly, and the most 
beautiful newspaper ever printed in Cali- 
fornia, and one that will undoubtedly prove 
the most generally entertaining and instructive. 
We will not enter into the detail of cost and 
beauty of frontispiece, and many more of the 
illustrations made expressly for this issue, nor 
of the choice reading matter by writers of 
genius and talent, nor of the matchless typog- 
raphy and presswork and general makeup of 
this thirty-six-page paper. We only ask 
those of our friends who are not on our sub- 
scription list to go to the telephone and call 
up Main 1053, and ask for the paper for one 
year, or six months. For one year it is $2 
and for six months $1. "Divorced on the 
Desert " will run yet sixteen weeks, and there 
will be the usual amount of society, theatrical, 
musical, literary and town talk, and much 
else that goes to make up a choice Los Angeles 
paper — no repelling nor indelicate features 
whatever in advertising or other departments. 

To be sure we are fully aware of the pride 
Angelenos take in the Western Graphic — the 
illustrated home journal of the southwest — 
both in its contents, illustrations and beauti- 
ful typography. We feel sure that this, our 
spring of '99 edition, will be duly appreciated 
as one of the most artistic and useful numbers 
of any paper ever published on the Pacific 
Coast, or anywhere else in the country. 

The cover design is acknowledged by high- 
class artists as well as connoisseurs as com- 
paring most favorably with the best ever at- 
tempted anywhere. The water color paint- 
ing, from which this cover was made, was 
designed and painted by Miss M. E. Curran, 
the brilliant young artist of this city, ex- 
pressly for this number. The photo-chromo 
engravings were made by the Mausard-Collier 
Engraving Company, and tells of its merits in 
work. There is but one other firm in the 
United States that make pretentions of doing 
such wrrk, which is a feather in the cap of 
our local engravers and something for Cali- 
fornians to be proud of. The typographical 
excellence is due to the big printing house of 
Geo. Rice & Sons, and considering it was 
gotten out as a regular weekly issue, speaks 
for itself. 

We rather favor the anti-cartoon law if it 
shall not trespass upon legitimate picture 
making. It is quite time that the man handy 
with the crayon should be limited in his 
delineations. It is high time indeed that the 



cartoonist should be checked in his reckless 
manner of portraying candidates for office 
and office holders and others who are not 
favored by his political paper. It has come 
so that the railroad man, the capitalist, the 
statesman, the soldier, the everybody of ac- 
count, from the President of the United States 
down to R. Curtis Porter, is made the subject 
of pictorial ridicule, which is clearly not fair, 
not right. Your skilful cartoonist knows just 
how to delineate sufficient features of his vic- 
tim so that recognition is easy, and then he 
invests his sketch with all the repelling or 
ridiculous effects that the subject will admit, 
and he often carries out his work so artisti- 
cally, yet ridiculously and inhumanly, as to 
injure strictly honorable and high minded 
persons and make them the laughing stock 
of many of their real admirers and friends. 
Some of the best men in the country have 
been hounded nearly to death and made a 
terror to their own children by these car- 
toonists, who are themselves generally very 
sensitive and oftentimes more profligate and 
reckless of the punctiliousness of true man- 
hood than those whom they hold up to ridi- 
cule and scorn. There is no earthly good or 
gain to be accomplished by such cartooning 
as has been indulged in by many of the lead- 
ing daily papers in this State; and if anyone 
will look at the matter fairly and seriously its 
downright meanness and uncharitableness is 
apparent. In their own defense the cartoonists 
refer to Nast's pictures of Tweed and Con- 
nolly and others of the New York Ring of 
thirty years ago, but they forget that this 
same mercenary Nast traduced by his wonder- 
ful crayon everything and everybody con- 
nected with the Catholic Church, from the 
Pope to the most modebt Sister of Mercy, in 
Harper's Weekly for nearly ten years; that he 
besmirched by his same inimitable process the 
names of Grant and Hooker and Slocum, and 
all the gallant chieftains of the South, and 
that he hounded poor Greeley into an un- 
timely grave. We think the newspapers and 
the people of the State will become the better 
by the anti-cartoon law, and they should 
feel indebted to Governor Gage for his bravery 
in promptly signing it. 

To be sure we are not so sure concerning 
the necessity of compelling editors to "sign 
libelous articles." In the first place editors or 
others are not writing and publishing articles 
that would appear to be libelous unless the old 
Rhode Island law of " the greater the truth 
the greater the libel" be revived; in the 
second place the signing of all editorials and 
much other like matter would destroy the 
impersonal character of the paper, and it 
would be as extra official as any sumptuary 
law that has been declared unconstitutional 
by high courts; again it would make a news- 
paper less respectable and less dignified; and ; 
lastly, the editor could evade the purpose of 
the law by signing his own name at the 
bottom of the last page of the paper as such 
and assuming all responsibility, which latter 
he does now, in fact. In fine, the anti cartoon 
law is necessary and good —the other is un- 
necessary and no good. The one can be en- 
forced, the other can not. 



OUR SAN FRANCISCO LETTER 

San Francisco, Feb. 28, 1899. 

WHEN the bicycle races closed here last 
Sunday night there was an end to the 
biggest event of the kind this Coast has ever 
witnessed. A six-day race, a 24-hour race, 
the number of the short races has been legion 
and records uncounted have been broken. 
The particular public allowed that the "poor 
fellows" were being murdered in the long 
drawn-out six-day race, but with a few excep- 
tions they drew up for the 24-hour event as 
fresh as though they had never seen a six day 
race. The Pavilion track will find a perman- 
ent resting place at the Olympic Club ground. 
The crack riders will hie themselves to the 
sunny south at San Jose, Fresno and Santa 
Monica, after which I believe they return 
here. 

John L. Sullivan opened at the Comedy 
Theater Saturday to a crowded house. When 
all is said, John L. stands alone, in a peculiar 
position. He was the first and greatest of his 
kind. He is popular and always will be; he 
made no pretentions to be anything but what 
he was, and does not now. He was a fighter 
and now he is an ex-fighter. His show is as 
good as any of its kind; as the people said 
when he umpired a baseball game in Oakland 
and were so numerous as to break v*p the 
game, " We came to see you and not the base- 
ball." Thus is greatness recognized in this 
republic. This recalls a vi^it I paid to the 
battleship Iowa, which graces the blue waters 
of the bay. Mayor Phelan was the guest of 
honor and the occasion was an entertainment 
gotten up by the marines — who, by the way, 
consider our mayor (and rightly) no end of a 
good fellow. I started to say that this enter- 
tainment was held directly under the noses of 
the two big guns, "Fighting Bob Evans" and 
"John L. Sullivan." It was but a minstrel 
show, still 250 of our elite were there in their 
best "bib and tucker." 

Black Patti and Ernest Hogan closed at 
the California Saturday, and have gone south. 
Ernest Hogan is funny, and although Siser- 
etta Jones (Black Patti) can't sing as well as 
she could 12 or 15 years ago, she does well. 
The company is good, and one can say that 
they got all they paid for after the perform- 
ance — and you know that is not always true. 

Edward F. Searle is to add another gallery 
to the Hopkins Institute of Art. He has 
accepted the plans and announced that the 
construction will be commenced at once. The 
cost of this annex will be in the neighborhood 
of $20,000.' 

It is to be hoped that there will soon be 
some change in the subject of the bulletin 
boards at the offices of the morning papers. 
Regularly each noon the sidewalks are blocked 
by the "constituents" of our legislators, to 
ascertain whether yet a way has been found 
from out the darkness surrounding the Sena- 
torial enigma. The excitement, if any really 
existed in San Francisco over this affair, has 
long since passed. The betting public were 
offering odds of two to one that Col. Dan 
Burns would be elected by Saturday, and this 
was two weeks ago. Col. Dan has a good 
many folks around these parts well scared by 
his bark, whether he intends to bite or not, 
for the offer found few takers and their clarion 
was heard up and down the line for several 
days. Rao. 



i 



Western Graphic 



Town Talk and prattle 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA is the only 
country in the world where all the fruits 
and vegetables of 
northern and semi- 
tropical latitudes may 
be picked at various 
times during the year, 
and where a person 
may tramp in the 
snow and bathe in 
the ocean during the 
same morning. And 
Los Angeles City is 
the only place on the 
globe where success- 
ful oil wells are flow- 
ing in gardens of 
never-failing flowers 
and groves of golden 
fruits. To be more 
particular there are 
scores of splendid 
flowing wells ten min- 
utes' ride from the 
City Hall only a few 
feet from residences 
of owners over which 
may be seen climbing 
Lam ark roses Japan- 
ese honeysuckle, jas- 
mine and other trail- 
ing plants. The very 
derricks in front gar 
dens are festooned 
with aromatic shrubs 
and flowers and own- 
ers direct operations 
with one hand and 
pluck oranges with the 
other and listen to the 
thu ls of the oleagin- 
ous machinery ac- 
companied by the enchanting minstrelsy of 
the linnet, the mocking bird and the thrush. 



our great sources of wealth. The Chino fac- 
tory has made an exceptional record; and 
that at Los Alamitos has often crushed daily 
three hundred and fifty tons of beets and 
turned out sugar of a high grade. The beets 
grown in the neighborhood of Alamitos carry 
a high percentage of saccharine matter, and 




The electric systems of street cars in Los 
Angeles eli< it the admiration of visitors prob- 
ably more than 
any other single 
appliance, as al- 
most every 
prominent thor- 
oughfare is trav- 
ersed, there be- 
ing more than 
fifty miles in all. 
It is really a 
great pleasure 
trip to get or 
one of these cars 
of an evening on 
Sunday and ride 
to the end down 
or up long lines 
of stylish and 
imposing archi- 
tecture, and 

through miles of flowers and shrubbery such 
as can be seen in no other city in the world. 
We blush to enumerate all the edifying and 
recreating diversions of Los Angeles, whose 
equal does not exist on the globe. 

The beet sugar interest of Southern Cali- 
fornia is undoubtedly destined to be one of 



the farmers have been benefited by the new 
tariff. Take it for all in all, it would cer- 
tainly be a hard thing to find on earth a re- 
gion with a greater or more remunerative 
variety of products than Los Angeles county. 




Some bright society women have adopted a 
new device to save useless and unnecessary 
correspondence. Everybody knows the mean- 
ing of R. S. V. P., which, by the way, is now 
translated into plain; English— P. A. (please 
answer) — but the new initials N. A. R. are 
not yet familiar. They stand.for "no answer 



required." To receive an absolutely unneces- 
sary letter is as bad as having to write one 
and the number of people who think it polite 
to answer one letter by writing another is so 
great as to compel the adoption of this de- 
vice. "N. A. R." will save a lot of mental 
wear and tear. 



"Not much am I going to the Horse Showl" 
exclaimed the Cheerful Idiot; "People who 
were there every night say they were nearly 
frozen to death. Cold feet by the dray load, 
influenza, cold chills, grippe, and the Lord 
knows what. I am not so big a fool as I seem. 
Two suits of underclothes and dress suit — no 
such fashionable humbug as that for me. I 
can see all the draught horses I care for on 
the streets." And yesterday the Cheerful 
Idiot was sent to the pesthouse — you can't 
always tell, don't you see? 



Homkr EABLE says that reading tiresome 
poetry when you have a streak of sadness is 
like reading a cook book when you are hungry. 
— A gcod many people made fun of the old 
Wallace circus tent used by the Horse Show 
managers, but Dan Freeman says a canvas- 
back is good enough for him. — Colonel Gaffey 
says that as competition is invariably the life 
of trade, the Harbor Celebration must come 
off. — Bob Eckert says that many men resemble 
whales; they no sooner get to the top than 
they begin to blow. — " Most men will tell 
you," suggests John F. Francis, "that a good 
name is better than riches; but they keep right 
on hustling for the ducats just the same." — 
Bob Kern is of the opinion that drink is a 
noun that many men are unable to decline. — 
Billy Garland's advice is, " Mortgage your 
house for all you can while you are about it, 
for you'll probably never get it back." — Fred 
Henderson admits that the train boy books 
more passengers than the general agent — An 
East Los Angeles man takes home candy to 
his high-tempered wife nearly every evening, 
and then boasts of his sugar-curing process.— 
It shocks Papinta to estimate how many bald 
heads she would dance before could her mir- 
rors be so arranged as to get in their deadly 
reflections of the habitues of the front rows. 
Burt Estes Howard says that between two 
evils many men choose them both — Manager 
Myers disdains the idea that Papinta is 
merely the greatest drawing card in the vau- 
deville business; "she is a whole pack," he 
says, with fervor, "including the joker." — 
Peter Martin says that it takes the moon two 
weeks to get full and two weeks to get over it, 
but that men are different. — " The osteoph- 
athists get along all right until something is 
really the matter with them and then they 
call the physician," says Dr. Orme. 

We are grieved to hear that the Catalina 
Yacht Club has come to an untimely end 
from too close association with the water. We 
always knew that the members were not sea- 
worthy, as they say of craft, and now their 
club and boat house at Terminal Island has 
also suffered from mal de mer and collapsed. 
They were all land lubbers and old Neptune 
loved them not a little bit and his playful 
waves nearly swept the structure off the beach 
a few weeksago. For like the biblical parable 
of the house builded upon the sands, it did 
not endure forever. We would advise a local 
Mount Aararat or the neighborhood of Salton 
for the future habitation of the Catalina 
Yacht Club. 

" What though the seas be calm, 
Trust to the shore." 



Western Graphic 



5 



Warren Wilson, publisher of the Jour- 
nal of Los Angeles, has been in the East some 
time, as he also owns a newspaper in Denver. 
To hear him one would think the old fellow 
disliked the climate of the Rockys, for he 
says, among other things, in a private letter: 
* * * "I brought my family to Denver 
for a change, and they had it — with a ven- 
geance. During portions of January and Feb- 
ruary the thermometer registered from zero to 
twenty and thirty below — about four steady 
weeks of this weather. A ton of coal lasted 
only about five days in my furnace, and even 
then we froze. Deaths by freezing were quite 
numerous in the mountains, and a few in this 
city. One young woman chose this manner 
to suicide — went out in the snow at the end of 
the street car tracks, lay down and died. My 
ears were frozen twice. We have all had 
enough of it, and are longing to get back 
again." 

Sousa, the] peerless com- 
poser of American marches, 
conductor of the unrivaled 
band whose playing has 
aroused music lovers of 
every community in .[the 
United States, will be'heard 
in this city on Tuesday 
and Thursday, March 14 
and 16. This announce- 
ment means a quickening 
of the musical pulse and a 
brightening of the musical 
eye. Sousa's influence over 
every manner and kind of 
humanity which loves 
music is out of the com- 
mon. He stands as a proof 
of the theory of hypnotism. 
It is related upon the au- 
thority of a well known 
correspondent, who was in 
the Orient when the Chinese forces retreated 
in disorder before the victorious Japanese, that 
the military bands of the latter inspired 
their soldiers with the stirring strains of 
Sousa's marches. They are played by all the 
famous bands of the armies of England, 
France, Germany and Russia. This is fact, 
not fancy. 

As for the band, it is universally and un- 
hesitatingly admitted the finest in the world 
today, and without a rival that in any man- 
ner approaches its magnificent playing of mil- 
itary and concert music. The renowned musi- 
cian at its head is a rare illustration of a born 
leader. To his grace and personarmagnetism, 
allied with the individual talents of the band's 
membership, can be traced the surprising 
excellence of the organization. The critical 
public, as well as that larger and more cath- 
olic body, which loves and appreciates music 
of the lighter vein, will both be amply satis- 
fied with the programs offered at the Sousa 
concerts. 

Sousa on the conductor's stand is unique. 
He is unique because he does things that no 
other conductor could do. When he conducts 
one of his famous marches he does not do it 
altogether with his baton, but with his body 
and his arms. His motions are those of the 
base ball pitcher. Now it is an "up-shoot" 
and again it is a "straight delivery," then he 
sways both arms to and fro. If anyone else 
attempted to do it, it would seem incongruous. 
It strikes you as remarkably apt and fitting 
with Sousa. Every motion of his body meanB 



something. The spirit of the music flows from 
them. 

We invite especial attention to our illus- 
trated article on the Chamber of Commerce, 
as in it are rehearsed the many things that 
body has done fcr this section and the good it 
is continually accomplishing, not the least of 
which has been the aggressive pushing of the 
San Pedro Harbor movement to satisfactory 
conclusions. No one should fail to visit the 
Chamber of Commerce hall, corner of Fourth 
street and Broadway, as in its way it is as much 
an educational institution as the High School. 
The majority of the exhibits in the cham- 
ber are donated either by manufacturers or 
producers, a card bearing name and address 
being attached to each article, and a record 
made of such donations. The exhibit room is 
open daily except Sunday from 9 a. m. to 5 
p. m., free to all who choose to visit it. The 
following are the directors for the present year: 




MERINO, a curly pony: winner of three prizes at the late Horse Show; entered 
by Mister Klraer E. Frink. It is a curiosity among horses having been caught 
wild about fifteen months ago in the (iuiama Hills, Santa Barara county 



J. S. Slauson, pres't.; M. J. Newmark, first 
vice-pres't. ; A. B. Cass, second vice-pres't.; W. 
C. Patterson, Treasurer; Chas. Forman. J. 
Ross Clark, Geo. H. Stewart, D. M. McGarry, 
H. Hawgood, F. Q. Story, H. S. McKee, J. W. 
McKinley, E. F. C. Klokke, Thos. P^scoe, 
Chas. H. Toll, I. N. Van Nuys, Robt McGar- 
vin, Ferd K. Rule, W. A. Harris, C. H. Ses- 
sions. Frank Wiggins, secretary and super- 
intendent of exhibit. 



Albert L. Ross is a name that in hotel cir- 
cles in the east is as familiar as the seasons, 
and it is only lately that the charms of Los 
Angeles have lured him from his famous 
hotels in the White mountains and Florida. 
But this city is the gainer, and in the Hotel 
Rosslyn we see the results of his experience 
and thorough understanding of the require- 
ments of the traveling public. Of the 140 
elegant rooms there is not a dark room, and 
each is fitted with telephone, hot and cold 
water and steam heat. There are delightful 
sunny suites with private baths, the table ser- 
vice is superb and. being so centrally located 
opposite the postoffice is a popular hostelry. 

R. Magee the well known silk and felt 
hatter at 218 N. Spring street, Temple block, 
carries a fine line of the latest and most up to 
date styles in men's headgear, at prices that 
make and keep customers. Mr. Magee is a 
hatter of wide experience, and has a well 
earned reputation for doing strictly first class 
work. He makes a specialty of repairing and 
reblocking silk and felt hats, and has had line 
success in this line. 



DEATH OF A LOVABLE WOMAN. 

THE death of Miss Frances Scott on the 
24th ultimo removes from our midst 
one of the most worthy women of this city and 
one of the best that has ever lived; and the 
loss will be a grievous one to all who knew 
her, for she was the possessor of all the virtues 
that culminate in perfect womanhood. She 
was 46 years of age and was born in Los An- 
geles, her father, Jonathan R. Scott, and his 
family, coming here in 1850 with the families 
of the late Joseph S. Mallard and John G. 
Nichols. The deceased lived for many years 
on Main street, near Second, where the Cathe- 
dral now stands, and at the age of 14 she was 
a teacher in the public school on the corner of 
Second and Spring, where now rises the Bry- 
son block in majestic proportions. Miss 
Scott, all the way from girlhood, had the 
happy faculty of making everybody around 
her buoyant and sunshiny, and particularly 
enlisted all children in her entrancing per- 
sonality. She was affectionate and unselfish 
and leaves, besides many relatives, a multi- 
tude of friends and acquaintances to mourn 
her death. She has been for years noted for 
church and charitable work, and her many 
deeds of kindness and care for the sick and 
needy and distressed have made her name a 
household word in East Los Angeles, where 
she has resided for twelve years. No one not 
fully aware of her self imposed duties can 
at all realize what an angel she has been, nor 
appreciate her multiform lovable qualities. 
Her death, superinduced by la grippe, was a 
tremendous shock, as she was strong, robust 
and healthy all her life, and was ill only a 
little more than a week. A large concourse 
of friends met at her funeral, Walter Mal- 
lard, George Safford, Henry O'Melveny, Ed- 
ward Nichols, Albert Sidney Johnson and 
W. D. Stephens, acting as pallbearers, 
and Mayor Eaton and Colonel H. T. Lee as 
honorary pallbearers. During the service at 
the grave not a dry eye was to be seen, and 
many wept bitterly, as the remains of sweet, 
good Frankie Scott, the Christian and Samari- 
tan, were solemnly lowered alongside of those 
of her beloved mother. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PRODUCTS 

THE following illustrates the number of 
varieties of fruits produced in Southern 
California and the seasons during which they 
may be gathered fresh from the orchard, vine- 
yard and garden, making allowance for minor 
changes as to altitude and location: 
Apricots, May to September. 
Apples, June to December. 
Blackberries, June to September. 
Cherries, May to August. 
Currants, May to July. 
Figs, July to December. 
Grapes, July to December. 
Guavas, nearly all the year. 
Gooseberries, May to June. 
Lemons all the year. 
Limes all the year. 
Loquats, May and June. 
Melons, July to December. 
Mulberries, June to September. 
Nectarines, July to September. 
Olives, December and January. 
Oranges, all the year. 
Peaches, June to November. 
Pears, June to October. 
Plums, Jure to October. 
Prunes, July to November. 
Persimmons, November and December. 
Pomegranates, August to November. 
Quinces, August to November. 
Raspberries, June to December. 
Strawberries, all the year. 



6 



Western Graphic 




views "/•' mi: mauxifk'Ext home of hail hohdex, a eii a mf.ra 




IViolo by P.erce 

BEAUTIFUL ALHAMBRA. 

U T)EAUTIFUL for situation," is this 
D colony of homes. Gently rolling land, 
commanding a view of a long sweep of moun- 
tain and sloping mesa on the north, overlook- 
ing the San Gabriel Valley on the east, than 
which there is no more lovely in the country, 
only a few miles- from Los Angeles on the 
west, the location of this ideal place for homes 
could not be improved. Settled at first be- 
cause of its greater exemption from frost and 
wind than other neaiby localities, its flowers 
and trees bear witness in the colder and 
stormier seasons to the wisdom of its dis- 
coverer, the late Don B. D. Wilson. The 
thrifty orange groves and ample lawns and 
abundant flowers also testify to the plentiful 
supply of water — no lack ever being felt, even 
in the dryest years. The graded streets are 
sprinkled, and the trim shade trees and well 
kept sidewalks would do credit to a much 
larger town. Beautiful homes nestle among 
the orange trees and palms, many of them 
pretentious and some elegant. Three churches 
shelter three harmonious congregations and 
the young men who fill the pulpits are much 
above the average in ability. Union services 
of the churches are frequently held. 

But the crowning glory of Alhambra is the 
people who live there. After a nine years' 
experience, the writer is confident that in no 
other settlement of Southern California of the 
same size will be found the enterprise, ability 
and refinement which characterize Alham- 
brans. A woman's club of sixty members 
forms a fine unsectarian nucleus; the Knights 
* of Pythias have a banner lodge, the Masonic 
order is represented by a live working lodge, 
and there are a card club and book clubs 
galore. The public schools are the pride of 



the place, the more now that the fifth depart- 
ment is added in the form of the high school. 
This was done by a special tax. A tennis 
club of forty active members has a club house 
with parlors, dining room and kitchen, and 
attracts by its excellent courts, cordial hospi- 
tality and good playing, many tennis experts 
from a distance. 



Bug. hy M'tuxard-Collier Co. 

three groceries and one drygoods store, meat 
saddler and barber shops, plumber, livery 
stable, restaurant, paint shop etc., so that liv- 
ing can be made independent of Los Angeles. 

But this is not at all necessary, for within 
a few weeks the Terminal Railway Company 
will have in operation an electric road from 
Alhambra to Los Angeles by way of South 




VIEW OF MAIS .STREET, ALHAMBRA, CALIFORNIA 



A new evening literary and study club has 
just been organized for the young people and 
the University Extension has a large mem- 
bership for the Zoology course by Professor 
Claypole. At the village center is a hotel, 



Pasadena; the Monrovia road now owned by 
the Southern Pacific will then be electrized, and 
there is now being agitated the building of a 
boulevard over the Mission road. 

One of the most inviting spots in Alhain- 



Western Graphic 



7 



bra is the Ingleside Gardens, whose owner, 
Capt. F. Edward Gray, is so well known in 
Los Angeles. Twenty acres of sweetness and 
bloom make a sight worth going miles to see. 
Surely the future is bright for our beautiful 
neighbor, and whosoever casts in his lot with 
hers will find that his love and loyalty will 
never diminish, but happiness and peace will 
attend him forever. 

One of the finest ranches and homes in 
Southern California is that of Jacob Bean, at 
Alhambra. Mr. Bean's residence is a model 
Southern California home set in beautifully 




TLbt Crown of the Valley 

Pasadena, March 3, 1899. 

DEAREST BETTY:— This week has been 
almost without an incident of interest 
in society. The Spinster club continues to 
hold numerous rehearsals and Miss Daggett is 
busy getting up a play entitled, "The Country 
Girl," which will be given after Easter at the 
Opera house by some of the young society 



them each paid for himself or herself. That 
is the way the society men usually do things 
here, and no one would expect, I suppose, the 
great literary lights and scholars of Pasadena 
tj change a fashion in social matters. Mrs. 
Lucretia Garfield was the guest of honor and 
after the banquet there were speeches and dis- 
cussions on the deepest subjects. I don't know 
what any of the speakers said, but Jessica 
told me they were things nobody knows any- 
thing about — like where we came from, what 
we all came here for and where we are all go- 
ing when we get through. I asked Jessica if 





HOME OF JACOB BEAN, ALU A MBit A 



■ INTERIOR OF 8. B, KELLAM'S TA 1 BORING PARLOUS 



laid out grounds with magnificent lawn, 
shrubbery and a fine private tennis court. 
The ranch stables and implement buildings 
are substantial and commodious. The ranch 
comprises some forty acres, all citrus fruit in 
bearing. There are 7500 navels and 600 seed- 
lings with 116 trees bearing both seedlings 
and navels. The production of this fine grove 
for this season will reach 8500 boxes, 5300 
having already been picked, packed and 
shipped. The ranch has two artesian-fed 
reservoirs, one holding 1,118,000 gallons. 
The ranch is in splendid condition, every tree 
thrifty and showing ample proof of the man- 
agement of a thorough and experienced horti- 
culturist. 

One of the most unique and beautiful 
homes in California is that of Gail Borden, at 
Alhambra, which is illustrated in this issue. 

The setting of this gem is an orange grove, 
and the gem itself is a combination of Ameri- 
can and Spanish architecture, making a most 
attractive as well as modern and commodious 
home; and among the latest appliances is an 
electric illuminating plant of 250 light capa- 
city and when the grounds and house are 
lighted up it seems a veritable abiding place 
of fairies. Mr. Borden is a man of wealth, 
but is very active in promoting many enter- 
prises in Southern California. Among them 
is his interest in mines of which he is an ex- 
pert. Alhambra is very proud of Mr. Gail 
Borden and his hospitable home. 



Some tailors charge for their name, some 
charge according to their rent and some 
charge in proportion to the amount of busi- 
ness they are doing. But the tailor who keeps 
down expenses and prices his suits with a 
fair margin on the goods and work, is the fel- 
low we are all looking for. S. R. Kellam is 
his name and his Darlors are at 108 West 
Second street. He makes a specialty of a 
first-class business suit for the modest sum of 
fifteen dollars, and has yet to hear the first 
complaint from a customer. 



people who have dramatic talent, and this is 
anticipated with pleasure. 

The Sans Souci club continues its weekly 
dissipations in progressive euchre despite Lent. 
Last week the club was entertained by Mrs. E. 
A. Ford, at Hotel Green; this week by Mrs. J. 
D. Wilde of Orange Grove avenue. Jessica 
wouldn't tell me who won the prizes; she says 
I tell everything and 'the ladies of the club 
have made a cast-iron rule not to let the news- 
paper reporters find out who wins the prizes. 
I asked Jessica what they had against the 
reporters and she said the secret was that the 
same ladies kept winning all the prizes and 
they were afraid the general public would 
think there was something wrong about 
it. I can't see exactly 
what. I suppose those 
who don't win are afraid 
people will think they 
can't play, and those 
who do are afraid some 
one will say they cheat, 
but I don't believe the 
general public schedule 
the winnings of the so- 
ciety prize fights Any- 
way, anytime you really 
want to know who wins 
I can find out easily 
enough, for what twenty- 
four woman know can't 
be kept exactly a dead 
secret. 

The largest function 
of the week was the ban- 
quet at Hotel Green 
Thursday evening, given 
by the Twilight and 
Shakespeare clubs. It 
was what we girls call 
a Dutch treat, for al- 
though the men of the Twilight club invited 
the ladies of the Shakespeare club to join 



she got any fixed ideas on the subject and she 
said people didn't go to a banquet to get fixed 
ideas but something good to eat and she got 
plenty of that. I suppose that is the main 
thing, after all. 

The Misses Hugus gave a quiet but charm- 
ing luncheon party, Friday, at their home, 
"The Highlands." 

Mrs. Lionel A. Sheldon gave a delightful 
afternoon reception today in honor of her old 
friend, Mrs. Lucretia Garfield, widow of James 
A. Garfield, who is spending the winter in 
Pasadena. Phyllis. 

Governoh Gage came down from Sacra- 
mento one day this week and went back the 
next. For a man that is giving his attention 




PATIO DWKLUM; AT AI.IIAMHKA-Kcf-idence of L. B. Vtilk, Architect. Tli is 

dwelling Is a typical Patio Dwelling, perfect in nil its appointments— the Interior oonri 

being 26x26 feet Square— Open to the sky mid sunshine -nil the rooms surrounding the 

Patio and so arranged that you can go from one room to another and not go into the 

court. This court, an interior view (if which we show, is in the Ionic style— the most 
suitable where the court issmall. This court is now filled with growing flowers and is 
open to visitors on Thursdays of each week. 

to state affairs about sixteen hours a day he 
was looking very well — as well, indeed, as ever. 



THE SAN PEDRO HARBOR CELEBRATION 

THE projectors of San Pedro Harbor cele- 
bration are pulling ahead in their efforts 
to have a separate subscription from that to be 
raised for the en- 
tertainment of the 
National Educa- 
tional Association, 
and as the projec- 
tors of the former 
are aggressive men, 
it is fair to piesume 
that they will "get 
there." It seems 
to us that the idea 
of having the San 
Pedro Harbor cele- 
bra' ion at or about 
Fiesta time, and 
combine with it 
some of the fea- 
tures of Fiesta, is 
a good thing, partly 
because it will 
make the Harbor 
celebration more 
pi c t u r esque and 
partly because it 
will enliven the Fi- 
esta feeling, which 

is now slightly dormant and in danger of col- 
lapse. This should not be permitted to occur, 
for La Fiesta has been a great factor in the 
assimilation of the new and the old, and Los 
Angeles has been a real gainer thereby. There 
is no more interesting or instructive sociolog- 
ical study on the American continent than 
this same active, bustling and well-contented 
city of Los Angeles. That ''the old order 
changeth, giving place to the new," is not to 
be questioned, but the transition from the 
former days of "manana" to the modern ideas 
of thrift and business and activity has been 
so gradual, so delicately adjusted, and by such 
gradual consent, as to leave no heart-burn- 
ings, no deep-seated wounds and no scars. 
There has been a quiet and graceful process of 
assimilation between the caballero and the 
gringo, which has resulted in a community 
almost unique, proud of its progress, secure of 
its future, and delighting in its well-earned 
prosperity. 

AN ACRE OF ROSES 

AS THE San Bernardinoan approaches the 
Hub, says a San Bernardino paper, and 
enters its portals, he is saluted with the divinest 
fragrance from an acre of roses in bewildering 
variety of colors and tropical prodigality of 
bloom. Howard B. Smith, cashier of the First 
National Bank, has devoted a block to the 
most fragrant and radiant of llowers and 



Western Graphic 

established here a veritable kingdom of flora. 
He has perhaps five hundred trees which he 
has collected from parterres in various cities 
of the United States. He is an enthusiastic 



olive trees, the lemon, lime and other semi- 
tropic plants, that give a foreign appearance 
to the city. These are with us all the time, 
and ever green; but within a few days the 




SAN PEDRO II A RBOR UP TO HA TM. 



rosarian and carefully cultivates for his own 
delectation. The Marie Van Houtte, the bride 
of a sunbeam, the bud of which we consider 
the handsomest of all; the Bride, which is a 
miracle of beauty and delicacy; the Catherine 
Mermet, the Papa Gontier, the Perle des Jar- 
dins, a quintette which in our judgment sur- 
passes all; King Oscar, Deveniensis, Bon Si- 
lene and Triumph de Luxembourg exhale a 
sweetness that is not of this earth. The snow 
white blossoms of the kingly Mont Blanc 
blush in the shadow of the velvety Quintine; 
and the lovely Vale of Chamounie, which holds 
the mellow tints of a sunset in its glowing 
petals, droops its head beside the Gloria Mont- 
pelier. The rich La France and the Marechal 
Neil vie with each other in loveliness. The 
tints of the lustrous beauties were designed up 
above the sun-kissed clouds where the rain- 
bows are painted and the fragrance distilled 
by the selfsame alchemy that made the son- 
nets of Tom Moore. Their graces of color, 
fragrance and form are exhausted in these 
varieties. A garden of roses is the richest thing 
on earth. They breathe perfume like a censer. 
They are a type of something purer and 
dearer than anything on this earth. They 
are messengers of beauty and remembrance 
from God to His children. 



DELICIOUS PASADENA 



WHAT interests the tourists chiefly," 
says the Pasadena Evening News, 
" are the orange groves that stretch away 
from Pasadena on every hand; the palms, the 



peach, almond and other deciduous trees will 
be in bloom and the stroller through our 
streets and by-ways will be afforded a glimpse 
of an esthetic feature of Pasadena — the ap- 
pearance of these trees in blossom. The air is 
tilled with sweet odors; great bunches of white 
and pink of various shades will appear where 
skeleton limbs have been and then the soft 
wind will come and waft the feathery petals 
into the air and send them scurrying through 
the groves and over the mesa, so resembling 
snowflakes that one might imagine that the 
fair goddess of flowers was trying to imitate 
an Eastern snow storm. At the same time 
some of the orange trees are in blossom and 
burden the air with sweet incense. The birds 
are building their nests and myriads of wild 
flowers are opening everywhere; the poppy in 
rivers of gold winds over the mesa, changing 
the green slopes in a mysterious way so that 
the golden gloam of the copa de oro can be 
seen miles away. Such are some of the late 
winter features of Pasadena that give the land 
an especial attraction to the lovers of things 
esthetic. Pasadena should become even more 
than at present the home of a cultured people, 
lovers of the beautiful in art or nature, people 
of refined sensibilities, good people and those 
who observe closely — the men and women of 
great wealth who are coming here and daily 
selecting homes — are conceiving that this is 
just what is happening, and already few towns 
in the whole land can point to 12,000 people 
with so few faults and so many good qualities 
as we find here. With such a foundation, so 
fathered and mothered, the Pasadenan of the 
future should be a good type of man or 
womanhood. 




ANOTHER VIEW OF SAN PEDRO HARBOR. 



Western Graphic 



9 




CCHtb Our Boys at JMamla 

MERCADO DE DIVISORIA TONDO 

(THE TONDO DISTRICT MARKET) 

COVERING a territory some five acres in 
extent in the Tondo district is the above 
named market. It is by far the largest in 
Manila. One finds it during the first visit a 
veritable curiosity shop; but a few more visits 
soon wear off the curiosity, and sick with the 
filth, stench, disorder, corruption, the general 
chatter and hubbub, you leave some time in 
disgust, vowing like the Bowery boy you'll 
"never go there any more." 

Like all others this one is under govern- 
mental control, supervised by the president, 
minister and sergeant of the market. Subor- 
dinate to these are the collectors and servants 
or scavengers. The latter have a most drudg- 
ing work to do. Doubtless their olfactory 
nerves have become insensible to the over- 
powering stench that arises from the corrup- 
tion which they are obliged to remove. 

The receipts by the government for tem- 
porary stands, such as those for a day, two 
days or a week, are about $200 per diem. 
The greater part of this market is under a 
great shed as it were, made of beams and 
bamboo poles with a galvanized iron roof. On 
the outer side there is a line of shacks bound- 
ing the main 6hed. These dilapidated sheds 
with their roof of broken tile alternating with 
rusty and weather beaten tin roofs present a 
sorry sight indeed. These are mostly occu- 
pied by Chinese, and they have the meanest 
of all hovels. The dirt floor is always damp 
and they delight in filth and squalor. 

Little effort is made to preserve cleanli- 
ness; a rain storm brings mud galore. At the 
southeast corner is the approach to the canal. 
This stream is the recipient of a great amount 
of waste. Owing to the slowness of the cur- 
rent a large part of the deposit remains. At 
low tide, lo and behold, what a sight ! For 
ages no doubt the same thing has been going 
on, and there seems to be no effort made to 
improve it. On the canal cascoes of wood, 
stock, pottery and general products find their 
way to the market. Stone steps some fifty 
feet wide afford a convenient landing place for 
small boats and traders. 

Within this market may be purchased 
anything desirable in the way of knickknacks, 
merchandise and dry goods. In the various 
departments, for as such they are subdivided, 
you find all grades of goods. Wrapping paper 
generally consists of the banana tree leaf, and 
most of the purchasers carry their goods on 
their heads in little flat baskets, which when 
inverted serve as hats. In the vegetable de- 
partment greens, herbs, radish, sandal wood 
root (which is used to wash the hair with), 
sweet potatoes, onions, bananas, cocoanut, 
oranges (not as juicy as California fruit and 
the flavor does not compare with it), toma- 
toes (all very small but flavor similar to our 
fruit), limes (also very small and have little 
flavor). Thus things innumerable might be 
mentioned, but let this suffice for the vegetable 
department. 

We turn our attention to the butchers' 
booths. Among these dealers in meat we find 
a number of women and even maiden butchers, 
though the larger part are under the manage- 
ment of Chinamen; these when business ia 



slow think nothing of sitting at ease on their 
high stool with their bare feet on the meat 
block. Most of these venders make a specialty 
of a certain kind of meat. The customers are 
continually handling the meat and go from 
one place to another pricing it. One can se- 
cure anything from a sausage to jerked beef. 

Passing into the fish and poultry quarter, 
turkeys, chickens, doves, snipe, eggs, game of 
all kinds, shrimps and crabs of a great 
variety, young sharks, some two feet in length, 
fresh and salt water fish, oysters and almost 
countless other varieties of fish make it a very 
important section. 

The restaurants also do a thriving busi- 
ness, and the sight of these people sticking 
their fingers into all the dishes would lead us 
to conclude that they live from hand to 
mouth. The number of unappetizing dishes 
defy comparison anywhere in the world. There 
are lemonade, vino and cigar tables and oft- 
times the maiden dispenser of these beverages 
sits on the table in the midst of her wares. 
Pottery, wicker basket, dry goods, boot and 
shoe and sweet bread stands abound. 

One rarely sees a well dressed native here; 
it seems that it is a poor man's market. In 
one corner we see the barber, the ear, eye and 
nose doctor busy amidst the bustle of the 
street. Now and then a blind beggar makes 
the rounds; he receives a pittance here and 
there. Again at the entrance to the market 
we hear the strains of music, and here we find 
a party of street musicians; usually two or 
three are blind, and they are led from place to 
place by a pair of good eyes belonging to a 
little boy or girl. The blind place their hands 
on one another's shoulders and in single file 
march on, the blind leading the blind. 

The tax to sell a certain article in the mar- 
ket varies, but a few cents per day entitles 
them to a stand in the market. Here may be 
seen the rank and file of Manila's poorer 
classes. Geo. J. Oden, 

Battery H, Third Artillery, 
Manila, P. I. 

WHY THE NEW SOCIETY REPORTER WAS FIRED 

A LA STANLEY HUNTLEY, AUTHOR OF THE "SPOOK- 
ENDIKE PAPERS" 

%< \ T 7ELL, how did you get along at the 

VV party last night? " asked the city 
editor of a new reporter whom he had sent to 
write up a social occasion. 

" Not very well," responded the new re- 
porter gloomily. ''I don't think Cahuenga 
society is the top notch racket, anyhow." 

" What's the matter, demanded the city 
editor; "didn't they use you well?" 

" I can't say they did," rejoined the new 
reporter. " Now I went out there last night 
and waded right into the fun. I asked for the 
chairman of the outfit and told him we were 
laying out to swell their heads in today's 
issue, and he'd better hustle around and in- 
troduce me to some of the high muck-a-mucks 
if he calculated to have his name mentioned 
in the report." 

"What did he say to that?" asked the 
city editor, with a calm gleam in his eye. 

" He wanted to know who sent me. I told 
him the main guy of this shebang, and that 
when I'd got through shaking a leg I'd like 
some facts about the layout. If he couldn't 
give 'em I told him he'd better get the madam 
to heel up pretty lively or I'd give the whole 
outfit a deal in the paper that would make 
him think every hair on his head a band 



of music and all playing different tunes." 

" And what did he say to that?" inquired 
the city editor, the gleam deepening omi- 
nously. 

" Oh he was a friend to the paper and 
would do what he could for me. I told him 
he'd better hop right at it, and first I wanted 
to meet the gals. If he calculated to hold the 
friendship of your nibs, I said, he didn't want 
to waste much funny business before he had 
me bumping around in the mazy. He said 
if I'd go up stairs and take off my hat and 
overcoat he'd see me later." 

" Did you do it? " asked the city editor in 
a constrained tone. 

"No. I said I wanted something to eat 
first. So he took me down in the front 
kitchen and asked me if I liked boned turkey. 
I told him I'd take a leg and some of the 
breast. What do you think he gave me? 
Head cheese! If he didn't you can lick me. 
I couldn't eat that and so I asked him for a 
glass of beer and a cheese sandwich. He said 
he had some wine, so I drank a little and put 
a bottle in my pocket." 

"What did you do then?" interrogated 
the city editor, fingering a length of gas pipe. 

"Do? Jumping Judas Iscariot! What 
didn't I do? I went up to the parlor and he 
said I'd better take a description of the scene 
before I danced, and he gave me the names. 
Here they are: Mary Monroe, red frock, white 
sack, and hair bunched; Emma Latrobe, 
yellow dress and high heeled slippers; Marian 
Willoughby; some kind of thin stuff, white, 
and tied up with blue tape, and hair frizzled; 
Jennie Murchison, black clothes and a feather 
in her hair; Ella Wexford, red suit, flat in 
front and stuck out behind; Pauline Tresley — 
I tell you, boss, she was a daisy. Bigger'n a 
tub and dressed to the branch. She had on a 
velvet outfit a mile long, and sixteen rows of 
teeth on her gloves. Her hair was a dead 
yellow tied up like a bun and had a lot of 
vegetables in it. Florence Ross, green dress 
flipped up with velvet and hoisted up at the 
side with a white check rein; Vinnie Ham- 
mersly, white network with red streaks, walked 
with a limp and hair frescoed. Tbat's all I 
got. There was a lot of old pelicans there, 
but I knew you didn't care for them, and as 
for the men, I told 'em it would cost 'em a 
dollar apiece to get in, and as they wouldn't 
put up I just gave 'em the marble heart. I 
can state that they were a cheap lot, who 
don't know any more about society than a pig 
does about politics, and I'll teach them a 
lesson. And, I say, we'd better give the main 
duffer a whack. He did'nt introduce me to a 
solitary hen. Better say that he hasn't paid 
his gas bill for seven months and that day be- 
fore yesterday his accounts were found short. 
What do you think ? " 

"Got anything more about the party?" 
demanded the city editor, rising slowly. 

"Nothing, only that the grub wasn't fit to 
eat, though furnished by that popular caterer } 
Mr Gristofer. I told him you'd give him a 
puff that would make him feel like the defunct 
secretary of a horse show. You might say 
that the whole party was a dead failure on 
account of the villainous treatment to which 
our new society reporter was subjected when 
he asked for a handful of cigars. Say, what 
have you got for me to do tonight? " 

" Not a thing!" yelled the city editor, as 
he brought the gas pipe across the new re- 
porter's ear. 

" You infernal reptile, don't you know that 
was the best functior. jl the season and that 
the host is our biggest advertiser?" 



10 



Western Graphic 



LOS ANGELES 



igSg Queen City of Southern California 




INTRODUCTORY 




OVERGOING 
SUN SHINES 
upmi no region 
* of equal extent 
which offers so 
many and such 
varied inducements 
to persons in search of 
homes and healthful- 
ness of climate as 
does the region of which Los Angeles 
is the metropolis, and which embraces 
the counties of San Diego, Orange, San Ber- 
nardino, Riverside, Santa Barbara, Ventura 
and Los Angeles, lying between the Coast 
Range, or Sierra Madre, and the Pacific 
ocean. It is, besides being the natural habi- 



against intense heats and colds, and over- 
looking 200 miles of ever smiling valleys, 
which produce all the fruits and vegetables 
known, a veritable land of milk and honey 
and where every man may sit under his own 
vine and fig tree, and where flowers bespangle 
field and garden uninterruptedly year in and 
year out as the capricious calendars take their 
unnumbered processions. And all the prodi- 
gal preserves sweep majestically to 'the Pacific 
ocean, that trackless highway that reaches to 
Cathay and tempers the inland atmosphere 
so that winter and summer are nearly alike 
and the inhabitants between mountain and 
sea are spared the tremendous changes of tem- 
perature and consequent epidemics of disease 
and discomfort that seem to prevail at 





REPRESEATA TI I 'E IIAHITATIO.X (IF FIFTY YEARS AGO 



tat of productions which thrive nowhere else 
in perfection and commercial abundance, a 
region peculiarly attractive in the enlivening 
beauty of its scenery and the irresistible 
charms of its surroundings. There is no other 
panorama on the face of the earth that at all 
compares with this stretch of Utopian land 
and Arcadian clime, with its majestic back- 
ground of mountains forming a barrier 




RF.PREftE.WTA TIVE HA BIT A T/O.V OF THE PRESEJVT DA Y 
Stintfton Residence on Figverori Street 



all times in all other parts of the world but 
those sections lying between the Coast Range 
and the ocean from Crescent City to San 
Diego, and more particularly from Point Con- 
cepcion down to the Mexican line. Here is an 
intermingling of grandeur and repose, a blend- 
ing of the productions of deciduous and semi- 
tropical tree and vine, and an assimilation of 
the comforts and blessings that make South- 
ern California the most precious 
sitting in Nature's resplendent 
crown. 

A romantic glamor overhangs 
the region. Before the Declara- 
tion of Independence was framed 
this portion of California had 
been settled by Spanish mission- 
aries; and the missions and 
churches which they founded 
remain, many of them intact, 
and are still places of worship, 
while others have yielded to 
the touch of "time's effacing 
finger," and are but piles of 
impressive ruins. Wherever they 
were planted, to this day remain 
the elements of thriving, pros- 
perous and populous Commun- 



is A.XGELES HIGH SCHOOL 1WILDING 

ities; and as the knowledge of what, under 
the peculiar conditions of the soil and 
climate, is necessary for the development of 
the resources of the locality increases among 
the present occupants, 

, and as the necessity of 

utilizing all these ele- 
ments becomes daily 
more and more apparent, 
so does the wisdom of 
these pioneers reveal 
itself more clearly. 

A soil of exhaustless 
fertility, and the propin- 
quity of bodies of water 
^•.j sufficient for the pur- 

^^^BSiefc-^ poses of irrigation, 

to them the sine qua 
non, the germs, sr to 
speak, without which no 
foundation of a church 
or prosperous commun 
iiy was ever laid. But 
it would be idle in a 
mere introductory sketch 
to hope to be able to 
convey any idea of the 
beauty or fertility of the 
region whose general 
outlines merely are indi- 
cated above. The object 
aimed at in this edition of the Western 
Graphic is to bring permanently into notice 
the county of Los Angeles, its resources and 
the advantages which it offers to the immi- 
grant; and more particularly the city of Los 
Angeles and its just claims to the title of the 
commercial center of what must in the near 
future become a sovereign state, and a great 
one; the fact that it shall, in the nature of 
thing.*, become the local point at 
which an even larger railroad system than 
now exists must inevitably converge; that 
here and around here the soil and climate are 
peculiarly adapted to the production of certain 
staple articles with which the markets of the 
world never have been and never will be 
glutted; that with a small capital, industry 
and economy, forty, twenty, ten acres of land, 
will in time yield an income greater than can 
be derived from an equal space in any other 
locality, and that, in addition to these things, 
health, good laws, fine hotels, public 
libraries, free parks, religious organiza- 
tions of all denominations, and splendid news- 
papers, and the advantages of a 
comprehensive public school system offer 
themselves to the resident. 

Some twelve years ago Leland Stanford 



Western Graphic 



1 1 



was interviewed concern- 
ing the section of coun- 
try which radiates from 
the city of Los Angeles; 
and, among other things, 
he said: "Southern Cal- 
ifornia beats the world, 
and no living man 
would believe what won- 
derful strides it is mak- 
ing until he comes and 
sees for himself. It will 
be France duplicated, 
and every acre will be 
occupied, and in a few 
years will surpass any- 
thing on the face of the 
earth. It is on the solid 
basis of a tributary coun- 
try like this that Los 
Angeles City is destined 
to rise into imperial 
greatness as its commer- 
cial and financial cap- 
ital; and, if I am not 
mistaken, it is soon 
going to give San Fran- 
cisco a great race for 
supremacy in many 

things, and some day it will beat that city in 
population. San Francisco is going to have 
great rivals on the Columbia river and Puget 
Sound. Los Angeles, which will some day be- 
fore the next century go moving steadily to 
to sea, will have no formidable rival, although 




ANOTHER RE PRESENT A T/l'E HOME OF THE /'RESENT DA V 




JOSEPH I). LYNCH, 
founder of /his paprt and ediitn of the Hetahl quartet of a cettiuTy 



San Diego will always be a place of some 
commerce and a refuge for seekers after health. 
I should not be surprised at all if Los Angeles 
could boast of nearly a hundred thousand 
population before the close of the century and 
of more actual residents than San Francisco 
in 1925." 

THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES 

THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES is the 
gem city of the United States in many 
respects and is said to be the most delightful 



and beautiful city of one hundred thousand 
inhabitants in the world by many cultivated 
travelers. Mr. Joseph D. Lynch, by all odds 
the most glowing and effective writer that has 
ever lived in this section, and one of the most 
illustrious and prophetic of all the ardent 
editors who have delineated the en- 
chantments of this rosy land, pro- 
phesied, in his own matchless way, 
less than ten years ago: 

" Los Angeles is destined to be- 
come one of the most beautiful 
cities in the United States. It starts 
out with all the natural advantaegs 
of site and surroundings to make it 
attractive to the eye. Its topog- 
raphy is varied by low land and 
upland, valley and plains and hills. 
The valley itself is surpassingly 
beautiful, following the meanders 
of the river .and gradually rising 
in benches on both sidesuntil it 
merges in easy ascents into a suc- 
cession of hills commanding the 
most enchanting views which it is 
possible to conceive. Looking one 
way, the eye rests with delight 
upon mountain ranges that are 
majestic and picturesque, danc- 
ing in another direction, a vista 
of rare beauty is seen reaching 
away to the ocean. Miles upon 
miles of lands, rich in their agri- 
cultural possibilities and capable 
of supporting a dense population, 
stretch as far as the eye can reach 
in every direction. Such is the nat- 
ural framework for the beautiful 
city which the energy and intelligence of our 
people are now building up. It is the nerve 
center of nearly three million acres of the 
finest producing country on the face of the 
globe. And the nice discrimination and good 
taste of our people are carrying out their 
architectural designs in keeping with the nat- 
ural beauty of site and surroundings of their 
city. No one can drive through our residence 
streets without admiring the elegant character 
of the buildings to be seen everywhere. And ' 
when the environing hills are inspected one 



can see that wherever a sightly prospect can 
be had a stately building occupies it, or is des- 
tined soon to do so. We have made a magnifi- 
cent beginning. Our residence architecture 
will compare favorably with that of any city 
on the continent. When what has been so 
splendidly done in a few years is supple- 
mented with what is to be done in ten or fif- 
teen years, then Los Angeles will blaze out in 
matchless beauty. As the commercial center 
of this opulent and imperial county and the 
capital of Southern California, she is destined 
to become \. reat in all that makes greatness in 
a city, and to prove an attraction to strangers 
from the esthetic beauties that will char- 
acterize her architectural development." 

The evolution of Los Angeles from an 
adobe town with no high social, literary, com- 
mercial, financial, police, newspaper, and 
only slender educational features, to its 
present magnificent metropolitan status, is 
one of the wonders of the age, possessing, as 
it does, a full complement of all the features 
above enumerated and so many more as to 




itffciE 



BR ) 'SON II LOCK 



baflle the wariest statistician. In 1849, just 
half a century ago, there did not stand one 
single brick or wooden building. In 1851 a 



12 



Western Graphic 



structure of wood made its appearance just 
6outh of where the Pico House now stands, 
and in 1852 another wooden structure made 
its appearance and stood for a number of 
years on North 

Spring street, _ , , 

about opposite 
the site now oc- 
cupied by the 
massive Bullard 
edifice. A cor- 
rugated iron 
house was also 
erected in 1852, 
and also a brick 
which was occu- 
pied many years 
by Governor 
Downey as a res- 
idence. But Los 
Angeles still 
continued to be 
an adobe town, 
although it be- 
came the capital 
nf California in 
1845, and long 
after that year 
there were jails, 
hotel?, barracks, 
a court house 
and a newspaper 
nllice, and other 
pretentious 
structures — all of adobe. 

Along in the early 50's, and down to the 
early 60's, an occasional brick or wooden 
house would be built, and yet Los Angeles 
maintained its architectural spirit in layers of 
sun-burned mud. And its architectural name 
was mud clean into the 70's, although Abel 
Stearns, General Hancock, Chris Fluhr, John 



it is now a quarter of a century since the 
appellation 'dobe town would have bfeen ap- 
propriate or just. 

Let us call it a quarter of a century since 



system of street railways in the country, and 
fire, water and police systems that hold their 
own with similar crack systems in the East. 
The architecture of store and dwelling is the 




SCENE ON BROADWA Y SIIOU JNG TOM ER C 

the adobe yielded to the talisimanic touch of 
mortar and brick and iron and wood and 
stone. We will not dwell upon it in detail, 
and especially as nearly all the transforma- 
tion has taken place during the past twelve 
years. But let us glance at this magnificent 
municipality as it is today with its more 
buildings than it had inhabitants twelve years 




try hall 

richest and most tasteful on the coast, and 
there are miles upon miles of lawn and broad 
and spacious verandas overclimbed with red 
and white roses and scarlet pelargoniums, 
heliotrope and jasmine, a beckoning wilder- 
ness of ornamental trees and flowering shrub- 
bery alive with flash and song of singing bird 
and tinkling waters all aglint with golden 
sunlight, and above all 
a sapphire sky and all 
around intermittent in- 
cense as fragrant as those 
balsamic odors of Araby 
the Blest. 

The city of Los An- 
geles (the "City of the 
Queen of the Angels;"or, 
as the native Califor- 
nians have it, el pueblo 
de la Riena de Los An- 
geles) has been for years 
the center of a con- 
stantly increasing circle 
of admirers. Rarely, in- 
deed, is it visited by a 
stranger who does not 
leave it with regret, or 
make up his mind to 
return. Ae for its fixed 
and settled population, if 
they do not say of it, as it 
is asserted the Neapoli- 
tans say of Naples, "See 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY COURT HOUSE 



Wolfskill, Pio Pico. D. 0. Mesmer, Signoret, 
Abbott, B. D. Wilson, and some others, had 
ventured a few pretentious bricks. The real 
transformation of Los Angeles from an adobe 
town commenced, we will say, in the early 70's, 
and although "Sonora" remains, and there 
are elsewhere here and there an adobe classic 
that still defies the elements and the assessor, 



agol " From a dirty old treeless, dusty adobe 
pueblo it has become the gem city of America, 
with hundreds of miles of paved and curbed 
streets and boulevards, with schools for the 
accommodation of forty thousand children, 
nearly one hundred and twenty churches, 
hotels that match with the finest in the land 
in appearance and appliances, the most superb 




Western Graphic 



13 



Los Angeles and die,' 
they do better and say 
"Come to Los Angeles 
and live." The regard of 
the Angeleno for the 
place of his domicile 
soon grows into a pas- 
sionate attachment; and, 
whether spending a few 
days or wandering on 
pleasure or on business 
bent, through 'stranger 
continents, he counts 
only that day happy 
which shall restore him 
to his home. The charm 
of antiquity attaches 
itself to the history of 
the city, the settlement 
of which antedates, by 
many years, the earliest 
American emigration to 
this coast. The Anglo- 
Saxon pioneer found 
here a pueblo, the site of 
which had been selected 
with that almost intui- 
tive recognition of the fitness of locality which 
seemed to be a characteristic of the founders 
of the early Spanish settlements in the Occi- 
dent. Every day serves to confirm the wis- 
dom of the projectors of the city of Los Ange- 
les. Its growth has been steady and constant 
at all times during the past ten years — little 
short of marvelous. 

The city itself occupies an area of about 
six miles square, and is so located as to em- 
brace within its limits a most agreeable diver- 
sity of hill and plain, and to afford, from 
almost any point, a matchless panorama of 
mountain, valley, orchard, vineyard, and the 
distant sea-coast, with the island of Santa 
Catalina far beyond. 

To the gratification thus afforded to the 
esthetic taste, is to be added the assurance of 
a future career of undiminished and constant- 
ly increasing prosperity. Years ago, before 
the real march of improvement in which she 
has already made such giant strides had com- 
menced, the writer predicted the future great- 
ness of Los Angeles, and that, too, before a 




ENTRANCE TO AN A DA MS^STREET HOME. 



railroad tie had been laid — almost before the 
adobe buildings of the old Spanish pueblo had 
given place to any one of the long lines of 
modern edifices which now adorn her princi- 
pal streets, and many of which vie in elegance 
and beauty with the most pretentious struct- 
ures of older and far larger cities. 

Even if Los Angeles had nothing but its 
own county to depend upon, it is the commer- 
cial center of a self sustaining region. Corn, 
wheat, rye, -barley and oats among the grains; 
oranges, lemons, limes, olives, pomgranates, 
bananas, citron, among the semi-tropical 
fruits; English walnuts, almonds, filberts, 
among the nuts; apples pears, peaches, apri- 
cots, nectarines, in fact, all of the fruits of the 
temperate zone in perfection and boundless 
profusion, vegetables of every description, 
and many other productions which require 
exceptional conditions for ther proper devel- 
opment, all find in Los Angeles county a nat- 
ural home, and are tributary to the city's 
growth and prosperity. 

Among its many attractions, Los Angeles 



possesses a climate whose equability and de- 
lightfulness cannot be excelled. Flowers 
bloom in the open air the whole year round. 
There is not a month in the year in which 
fruit of some description is not ripening. 
Orange, lime and lemon plantations and vine- 
yards surround the city, and line either side 
of all the railways for many miles, and no 
pei son who visits California from abroad can 
be said to have completed his tour unless he 
has thoroughly inspected this city and its 
surroundings. Further advanced in its semi- 
tropical productions and in many other 
things than any other part of the state, the 
city and its vicinity thronged with memories 




A PRIVATE SCHOOL Itr ll.DINU, LOS ANGELES. 



of a bye-gone age, and a 
population of foreign 
habits and birth, pre- 
sents a number of inter- 
esting features for exam- 
ination not to be found 
elsewhere, and well wor- 
thy of careful inspection. 

A distinguishing fea- 
ture of the city is the 
cosmopolitan character 
of its population; and 
although it is growing 
more and more Ameri- 
can every year, Eng- 
lish, French, Spanish, 
German, greet the ear at 
every turn. Men of a 
dozen different nation- 
alities may be met in 
an hour's walk. For 
all this it is safe to 



14 



Western Graphic 



say that there is less clannishness, and fewer 
exhibitions of partisan fueling in Los Angeles 
than in any city of its size in the country. A 
general desire to advance the common in- 




v. m. <: A. iirihni.\<i 



terests of the community seems to be the per- 
vading spirit; and the incoming elements 
seem to assimilate and become part of the 
whole, with a singular, but none the less grat- 
ifying, alacrity. Taking it for all in all, Los 
Angeles may, with propriety, be presented as 
the type of a wonderfully prosperous and 
progressive city, offering every desirable in- 
ducement to the seeker after a home, in which 
will be found all the elements of soil, climate 
and whatever else is most to he desired in 



the premises. It may truthfully be said that 
the most glowing accounts of the charms of • 
the city of Los Angeles which may be given 
will be found to have left the half of them 
untold. 

SOME CLIMATIC CONDITIONS 
One of the amusing features of Los Angeles 
to the denizen of Northern and Central Cali- 
fornia is the proposition that we are in the 
habit of selling climate with our 
land. Now this is unquestionably 
true. South of Point Concepcion, 
probably the biggest single asset 
this region which, in a general way 
embraces all the coast counties, 
has, is climate. The climate of 
all the coast counties is good, but 
there are special little preserves in 
Los Angeles, San Diegoand the 
adjoining counties, where health 
and conservation of all the vital 
forces are epidemic. 

Now to the allegation that in 
Los Angeles we sell climate with 
the land, we may as well plead 
guilty ,and it is a good thing indeed 
that we have it to sell. They sell a 
good deal of climate, pure anc 
simple, in such places as Nice, 
Mentone, Cannes and other resorts 
in the south of Europe. We have as 
good a right or a better one than 
they, and we have at all seasons 
the exquisite climate that they 
have for only limited periods of the 
year. Los Angeles, if she ever had any ambi- 
tion of being a sanitarium, has long ago relin- 
quished it. This is entirely too busy a region 
to be much engrossed over the question of 
health. And yet it is a most important con- 
sideration. There are tens of thousands of 



people in the United States, men in the meri- 
dian of manhood and in the full vigor of intel- 
lect, to whom health is an overmastering con- 
sideration. They simply cannot stand the 
severity and changeability of the eastern cli- 
mate. Remaining in the eastern states is 
slow but sure death — and sometimes this death 
is by no means slow, but all too rapid. These 
men — at least those of the class we are consid- 




BULLARD II LOCK 

ering — are to all appearances not invalids. 
They simply have planted in them the seeds of 
consumption, or some other deadly ailment, 
and if they continue to submit to the condi- 
tions of their environment an early death is 
inevitable. 



METEOROLOGICAL DATA PREPARED FOR DISTRIBUTION BY THE LOS ANGELES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. 

Los ANGELE8, Cal., January, 1899. 

Table showing the highest, the lowest and the average temperature, and the rainfall at Los Angeles, California, by months from July, 
1877, to January 1st, 1899, inclusive. Data compiled from the records of the U. S. Weather Bureau Ofhce at Los Angeles by George E. 
Franklin, Local Forecast Official in charge. Temperature data obtained from self-registering instruments. 



January. 

Temp. 



February 



Temp. 



March 



Temp. 



2 = 
S a 



April 

Temp 



a a 



May 



Temp. 



June 



Temp. 



■ 

° .5 
a u 



July 



Temp. 



. c ^ 

•2 S i I 



August 



Temp. 



a 



a 



September 

Temp. 



October 



Temp 



s .5 1 

a a a 



November 

Temp. 



December 

Temp. 



x z x 
rt I? 



& «• 

_ J3 



1877 

i.S7» 72l37 55 3 
187974I36 53 3 
188076 3" 54 1 

1881 71 37 531 1 

1882 74 33 50 1 

1883 82 30 53 1 

1884 78j34 543 
>88s|72l3 s l55li 
i886 l 75 32|55 1 7 
1S87 8o 33 55 

1888 71I31 ;o,6 

1889 71I32 52 

18906734 49 7 

1891 80 34 56: 

1892 Si 37(57! 
ii-93 i>4 35,57;6 
if-94 75 32,5' 
)895 77 37 52 5 

1896 8; .,6583 

1897 79137 563 

1898 84 31 52 1 



33 7" 



4155 7 



59 803956 
33 7' ' i4 1 
43 864259 
o' \ 77 32 51 

62 82 2S 52 



15 8l 38 56,13 



05 .Si 
72 Si 

2D 82 

05 74 



36,57 1*. 

4 1 50 1 

35|5i| 9 
,9 54 



25 843356 



83!l8i 
25 7' 
88:74 
29 79 



35 54 
33 53 
38 54 

38 55 



94 73 35 51 
84 843657 
23 88 36 60 
70 83 55 5;, 
26 85140 58 



Av. 177 34 54 2 90 793655 



68 7641 57 
•97 99 42 59 
56 74 3652 

•36 18937 57 

• 66 8835 56 
■47 '84 43 58 

• 37 |72 37 56 

85 42 62 

.38.76I3755 
25 85 41 60 
77 793656 
.92', 81 144 59 
.36^814058 
56: 82 40 5S 
. 19 81 3656 
27( 88 .31 54 
49 823554 
46 843856 
89 35 58 

.62 
51 



78 38 55 
81 36 5.", 



93 



80 43 59 
884260 

83,4057 
9 I 48 6 
804038 
89 39' 58 
8042593 
89 45 63 

80 42 5 

87 40 61 ) 
99 44 63 
93 46 62 
9442 59 
86 42 59 

88 4c 59 

84 39 58 

85 4 1 59 
8241 59 

81 38156 
904061 
99 41 63 



3 ."9 S3 5S 57 2 85 8742 60 1 . 1 7 S945 63 



1.71 
1. 19 
5 06 
.46 
[.83 
15 
54 
00 
29 
'•30 
.11 
.27 
. 22 
.26 
22 
19 
•'3l 
.46 

• 19 

.02 

03 



89 47 63 
97 43 62 
97 42 63 
89 4 1 [64 
86 4-' 64 
100 41 64 

79 47 65 
So 49 66 
89 4-1 65 
92 44 64 
83 45 65 
94,46163 
96 43 63 
74 47 62 
99 42(62 
9" 45 63 

80 46 60 
8847 64 

103 44 65 
76 48 63 
So 46 60 



.66 
24 
.04 
.01 
63 
2 02 

34 
.c6 
.00 
.20 
.02 
.62 

03 

•3' 
2 .06 
.06 
.20 
• 19 
•3o| 
■ io| 
1 75 



814767 07 
1045068 .03 
8350 66 .00 
884867 .00 

87 50 66 T. 
10052 71 .03 

98 5<. 68 1 .39 
90(47 67 T. 
924869 01 

iooi47 6S .04 
943069 T. 
81 51 66 .00 

10548 68 .02 
8949 66 .00 
884664! .06 
904866 .03 
83 46 63 T. 

1004766 .01 

99 48 69 T. 

88 5066 T. 
95 50 67 T. 



47 1 92 49 67 08 



93 55 73 
88 52 70 

84 52 69 

85 52 65 T. 
9651 72 .00 
985271 .00 
9052 73 T. 
99 52 73 T. 
98 52I72 T. 
985072 .24 
9851 72 .07 
95 49 731 -03 
995471 00 
97 55 73 00 

109 54 74 T. 
9050 68 .00 
8950I70 .00 
S851 67 T 

85 54 68 T 
925471 .02 

86 52 70 T 
91 56J70 .07 



87567' -oo 
89 5471T. 

98 53 72: .00 
5269T. 
52 71 T. 

99 57 73 00 

9851172 (X) 

52 73 T. 



102 
'06 5 

98 54 75 

70 



94 52 
97 5" 

95 53 
9856 



96 54 75 



94 53 
92 54 
97 52 
8851 



9' 54 7i 



96 54 



93 52 71 



96 56 74 r, 



75 T. 



72 
7i 

70 

69 T. 



72 



.21 
.00 
.08 
.61 
• 03 
.00 
.01 
.00 
.01 

.01 
.00 



96 53 71 1 .04 



93 52 71 
103 5070 

j 101 47(69 
914466 
102 50 70 T 
100 46170 T 

'04 5374 
92 46 67 
10S si 7i 

I 9148 68 
91 4969 



98 55 74 T 
103 52 73 

94 54 7' 
10052 73 

95 5" 68 
904S66T 



.00 
T. 
T. 
.00 
• 15 



.00 
.06 
06 
.00 



73 



99 49 69 
97 4869T. 
92 50 68 T. 
975270 .00 
994871 02 



804364 
9' 43 65 
96 42 66 
89 44 63 
S2 4361 

88 44 63 
83 44 62 
S9 43 63 

102 42 66 

82 4' 60 
93 47 66 

98 44 66 

89 50 66 

99 46 68 
S9 46 66 
96 40 64 
91 46 63 
96 45 66 
91 45 66 
9047 65 

83 45 62 
9' 45 65 



975070 .05 



.86 
14 
•93 
'4 
.82 
.05 
1.42 
•30 
.26 
.01 
. 12 
36 
6-95 

• 03] 
.00 

• 33 

• 75 
.02 

• 24 
130 
2-47 

09 



S6 45 63 
81 57 59T 

84 36 573 

85 35 56 

81 34 57 
Si 36 58 

84 42 60 
88 5961 1 
178 40 605. 

85 34|57;'- 

86 39 60 . 

84 .40 6 4 

82 45 61 1 . 
96 4'|66[ 

85 4061 
90 4 1 624 

86 59 57 



45 Si 3657 
. 88 30 55 
44 76 30 53 
67 ISO 38 56 
?7 79 55 55 
57 



82 82 35 . . 

oo h So 37 56 
06 763655 
52 



38 59' 
3660 
84 37 60 1 
923762 . 
94 41 61 T. 



I 
4 

82 40 58 1 
(85 37156 
75 35 53 2 
79 41 57 6 
35 68 40 55 15 
13 ,82(43(61 2 

00 75 35 53 1 
4o j8c 35(54 4 
2o|j88(37,58 3 
oo(i75 39 54 4 
80 86 34 56 
66 84 42 59 2 

01 89 5056 



83 34 57 



• 93 

• 7o 

• 5 
.40 

52 
.08 

• 56 
64 
.63 
.18 
67 

.26 
.80 

• 32 
•99 
.18 
65 
.62 

• 78 
. 12 

• 05 
12 



904464 808639601.26,803656 3.53 



'5-24 

20 86 
1741 
18-65 

5-53 
io 74 
14. 14 
40 '5 
'0.53 
16 72 
16 02 
20.82 

33 25 
12.69 
12.84 
18.72 

21 96 
7 5' 

'2 55 
1 1 .80 
14 28 
4- S3 



Remarks. — The average temperature for the seasons, deduced from the tables, is as follows: 
The average season rainfall, 16.25. 



Winter 55; Spring, 60; Summer, 70; Autumn, 65: Annual, 62. 



The symbol T in the rainfall column indicates a trace of precipitation. 



It will be obseryed on examining the table that the lowest temperature recorded during the cold period of the year, or rather its calendar equivalent 
was 28 degrees, and during this season embracing sixty months there were but six of them when the temperature fell below the freezing point of water, 
and then this temperature was maintained but a limited time, usually in the early morning after which a material rise occurred. A fact to be noted in 
considering the table, in connection with the summer temperatures, is that during the period of greatest heat, the percentage of atmospheric moisture is very 
low, which so modifies the temperature that the heat is neither oppressing nor prostrating, which is well illustrated by laborers continuing work during the 
hottest period. 



Western Graphic 



L5 



A residence in Los Angeles means to these came out to Loa Angeles, located himeelf at dreda of examples could be multiplied to tin- 
men continued business activity, usefulness the Sierra Madre Villa and spent six months Bame effect, and with people nearly as distin- 
and prolonged life. Perhaps the lesson we at that charming resort, putting in most of his guished as Cameron. 

are seeking to enforce can best be taught by time in the open air, which is there as genial The number of perrons in dmilar plight 




Photographed by Pierce. 



SPRING STREET LOOKING NORTH FROM THIRD ON FED. /n.t/ 



Fngravod bv Mausiitd-Collier. 




THIRD STREET LOOKING WAST FROM HILL PHOTOQMA PHED AND ENQBA 
Photographed by Pierce. 



example. Some years ago Senator Don Cam 
eron, Grant's Secretary of War, found his sys- 
tem very much run down. He was threatened 
with general physical collapse. Like a sensi- 
ble man he took time by the forelock. He 



in winter as in summer. At the end of that 
time he returned east perfectly rehabilitated 
in health and was never tired of expatiating 
to his friends upon the magical restorative ef- 
fects of the Southern California climate. Hun- 



VFD SATUMDA Y WEB. /.v<:». 

Engraved by Ktnianl-CoUter, 

who have located here, entered into business, 
regained their health, and, in many cases, ac- 
quired fortunes, is legion. There is an elixir 
in the air of this section which is potent for 
the rebuilding of health, unless the settler has 



Hi 



postponed his arrival to too late a day, which, 
of course, happens in many cases — and none 
such should leave their homes for even this 
Messed land; nor should anyone broken down 
in mechanical pursuits, professional practice 
of law, medicine 01 religion. All such make 
a mistake and this country does not want 
them. Many of the leading business men of 
Chicago, like Andy McNally, and many others, 
come here and spend the winter. They are 
busy men and if they did not land a profit in 
it they would stay at home. 

The fact is that in Los Angeles itself the 
weather all the year round answers to an east 
em mid- May day. As an example in point, 
yesterday and the day before would serve for 
two of the fairest summer days in the most 
favored region on earth. On both days' we 
spent half an hour in the breakers of the Pa- 
cific ocean. We write this screed in our shirt 
sleeves, in a room without a fire, with the win- 
dow open. So delicate a flower as the camelia 
blooms in the open air, surrounded by tube- 



Western Graphic 



While in the summer time the mercury marks 
high figures in Los Angeles the heat here is po 
dry and rare, and the alternation of the land 
and sea breezes are so delightful, that nothing 
like the inconvenience involved in a heat ten 
degrees lower in the east is experienced here. 
And so of . the winter season. On the rare 
occasions on which the mercury sinks to the 
freezing point, at mid-day it is mid-May. 

No wonder that, under the circumstances, 
we sell climate with our land. And the ten- 
dency to consider climate and land together 
in Los Angeles valuations will grow with the 

passing years. 

SUBSTANTIAL REASONS FOR THE 
GROWTH OF LOS ANGELES. 
There are people living in this city today, 
and who have lived here through all the stages 
of its wonderful growth, who cannot under- 
stand why Los Angeles has emerged so grand- 
ly from its adobe conditions. It is in 
truth a matter of everlasting wonder to them 
that the capitalists ever thought it worth 



home. This remark of Mr. Kerens was half 
jest and whole earnest. 

There are a number of considerations that 
justify the past and warrant the future growth 
of Los Angeles, and we propose to recapitu- 
late a few of them. 

Of course we begin with our hackneyed sub- 
ject of climate. But we think we are justified 
in doing this when the Surgeon General of the 
United States army said, in 1888, that Los 
Angeles county had the finest climate on the 
earth. That certainly ought to be regarded 
as expert testimony. This exquisite meteor- 
ological dispensation is shared by San Diego, 
Santa Barbara and other points south of Point 
Concepcion, however. For 15 years Los 
Angeles has not cared to vaunt itself as a 
sanitarium — it has left such ambition far be- 
hind. 

Then there is the geographical position of 
Los Angeles. She commands a number of 
fairly good and serviceable roadsteads, one of 
which is already being converted into a deep- 




Photographed by Pierce 



AUMoi: V 



< '. I 77/ El) It A L 



8T1M.SON BLOCK 



CITY II A LI. 

PANORAMIC VIEW OF LOS ANGELES fe( 



roses, heliotropes and even the tropical banana 
in sheltered places. And yet the temperature 
is by no means enervating. Even in summer 
an alternation of the sea and land breezes in- 
sures indescribably pleasant days. 

On very rare occasions in winter the mer- 
cury sinks below the freezing point, but these 
freaks of the weather-clerk are matters of 
special note. Such a thing as an epidemic is 
never known here. It is over twenty years 
since there was a scourge of smallpox amongst 
the native California population, who at that 
time had a prejudice against vaccination. 
Such diseases as consumption rarely originate 
here, but are invariably brought to Los An- 
geles from abroad by persons seeking relief. 
Pneumonia assumes so slight a form in Los 
Angeles as to cause scarcely any uneasiness to 
the physician. Dr. Kannon, the physician of 
the Sisters' Infirmary, informed us that in a 
practice of five years in the city, including the 
hospital, he had only three deaths of patients 
from pneumonia Such facts speak wonders. 

And so we might continue indefinitely. 



while to build railroads into this valley in 
such numbers and with such perseverance 
that one can scarcely go anywhere in this 
county in the dark without tripping over a 
tie or breaking his shins on a rail. In truth, 
Los Angeles city and county are so bi-sected 
by railways that they may be properly de- 
scribed as enormous gridirons. 

Now it may be set down as the solid truth 
that capital rarely voluntarily selects an un- 
profitable field for investment. Los Angeles 
is thus distinguished because it has possibili- 
ties which attach to no other undeveloped re- 
gion on the American continent. 

Some five or six years ago Mr. Richard 
Kerens, the president of the Terminal Rail- 
way, came out here and looked thoroughly 
over Los Angeles county. When he went 
back home he told the people of St. Louis, 
where he lives, that while it required the product 
of acres in the Missouri Valley to load a car, 
a single acre in Los Angeles county would 
often load four cars. There were great sug- 
gestions in that idea, and it was well driven 



sea harbor by munificent contributions by the 
United States, which open up the broad 
Pacific and the storied East. This fact will 
give the City of the Queen of Angels the com- 
mand of the whole sweep of the continent to 
Galveston and New Orleans on the south 
and to Salt Lake and Denver on the northeast, 
and our business, immense as it is at present, 
will widen immensely when our deep sea 
harbor is completed. 

In addition to our unrivalled geographical 
position, we have our unapproachable railway 
advantages. Los Angeles is already one of the 
greatest railway centers on the continent. In 
addition to its numerous local lines there are 
today three great transcontinental railways 
centering here. One is the Central Southern 
Pacific via Lathrop and Sacramento to Ogden, 
to connect with the Union Pacific and with 
the Denver and Rio Grande Railway. The 
second is the Sunset route to New Orleans, 
giving us at El Paso other transcontinental 
connections. The third is the Santa Fe road, 
ncluding all the ramifications of the Texas 



Western Graphic 



17 



Pacific and St. Louis and San Francisco roads. 
A fourth transcontinental road, the Los An- 
geles and Salt Lake, will soon be built, which 
will make our transcontinental circuit com 
plete. The boasted metropolis of the state. 
San Francisco, would be happy indeed if she 
had half our railway advantages. 

But neither our geographical nor our rail- 
way advantages tell the whole story of the 
possibilities of Los Angeles. In range, variety 
and value of products Los Angeles is not sur- 
passed anywhere in the world. With the 
proper irrigation facilities a farmer can here 
make from three to four crops a year, alternat- 
ing peas, potatoes and similar vegetables. He 
can grow from six to eight crops of alfalfa an- 
nually, and the year's total yield will range 
from ten to fifteen tons of very nutritious 
Chilian clover to the acre. There is really no 
limit to the productiveness of the lands of 
Southern California. When it comes to the 
citrus fruits the owner of ten acres of orange 
or lemon trees in full bearing has a fortune. 



no other portion of the United States can 
furnish a parellel to it in ratio. 

SPECIAL CONDITIONS OF GROWTH 
There is, in a manner, a great deal of 
inaccurate thinking about the people who 
undertake to think at all about Southern Cali- 
fornia, and especially is this the case concern- 
ing those favored portions of this section of 
which Los Angeles is the center. It is quietly 
assumed that the conditions are such that if 
it is dull in the East and in other sections of 
the country it must necessarily be dull here, 
speaking from a business point of view. 

Now this does not follow by any means. 
It cannot too clearly be borne in mind, for 
instance, that Southern California — or at least 
such portions of it as are the center of any 
great Eastern travel — have any number of 
attractions that no other portion of the Amer- 
ican continent possesses. They are unique 
and almost illimitable. This is a new section, 
and it has been settled up with absolutely 
magical rapidity. Los Angeles is today twice 



veston will scarcely be a greater distance than 
from New York to Chicago. You can run 
almost a direct line from San Pedro to Hong 
Kong or Shanghai. Thus all the possibili- 
ties of intercontinental, transcontinental and 
oceanic trade are ahead for the City of the 
Queen of the Angels. 

Los Angeles promises to be the center of a 
tremendous mining region — we use the word 
center in a commercial sense. The Randsburg, 
the Oro Grande and a score of other districts 
bid fair to be a source of great trade and 
wealth to us; and, further along, as the Los 
Angeles and Salt Lake Railway is pushed 
ahead, cheap coal and iron, together with our 
own local oil production, guarantee the growth 
of immense manufactures of the latter metal, 
together with refineries, smelting and reduc- 
tion works and cognate industries. It would 
astonish many people to learn the magnitude 
of our manufacturing industries now. 

From this retrospect it will be seen that 
this city has a legitimate right to look for 




COURT HOUSE BAKER BLOCK ALISO STREET HIGH SCHOOL Engraved by Mausard-Collier 

LOM TOP OF MAIER & ZOBELEIN'S BREWERY. 



We have now reached a stage where some 
skill, ingenuity and capital will be applied to 
the handling of our fruits and other products, 
and the result cannot fail to be highly satis- 
factory. 

Added to our multiform and highly re- 
munerative products is the fact that Los An- 
geles is the commercial center of a region 
inconceivably rich in the precious and base 
metals. Refining and smelting works are 
sure to be located here, and it will not be long 
before the cheap coal and iron of Southern 
Utah will make the city of Los Angeles a 
manufacturing depot. 

Looking at the situation from any point of 
view, and the conclusion is inevitable that 
here is to be located the great emporium of the 
western side of the continent. The fact that 
Los Angeles is a matchless sanitarium will in 
no whit militate against her strong manufac- 
turing, commercial and railway advantages. 
In fact they are all synchronous, and will 
unite to accentuate a growth so marvelous that 



as large a city as Springfield, Mass., and yet 
Springfield was in existance over two hundred 
years ago. Dr. Holland wrote a charming 
novel whose scenes were laid in that town at 
that period. Springfield's present principal 
distinctions are that it has an arsenal of the 
United States and the celebrated Springfield 
Republican newspaper located in its midst. 
For such a marked disparity in growth there 
must be some decisive reasons, and there are 
many of them, we can assure the reader. 

In the first place, this region, as we have 
said, is young and has all the ingenuous 
charms of youth. Its almost illimitable re- 
sources remain to be exploited. They include 
almost every production on earth in the vege- 
table and mineral kingdoms. Within a short 
radius of Los Angeles every subtropical and 
many of the tropical fruits are grown. Within 
an almost equally short radius every metal 
taken from the bowels of the earth can be 
found. From ite "deep sea harbor" will start 
across the continent all the transcontinental 
lines. From that harbor to tide water at Gal- 



growth and development though the re